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lizztwozee

Slack Poolish?

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Dear bread baking experts: I recently had an experience with a "slack" starter batter, which I mix at 100% hydration, and ferment for 12 hours. The formula was 103 oz. flour and water, and 2tsps. instant yeast. I used tepid water, and left it at room temperature for about 12 hours, that being around 65-70 degrees. The next day, I noticed it had not risen very far, and fell quickly when I moved the vessel it was in. When I went to scoop some out for the first batch of bread, it seemed "slack" -- very sloppy and loose, with a bit of water seeping in at the bottom, as if it had over-risen and the gluten had broken. It didn't seem to have any elasticity, just watery sloppiness! The only thing I did differently was to mix this batch with a wire whip at medium speed about 2 minutes (I usually just use my bare hand to mix and incorporate all the water in the flour, and it usually has some lumps), which left the batter very smooth. Any thoughts?


Lizz

---

"you miss 100% of the shots you don't take"

-Wayne Gretzky

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Dear bread baking experts: I recently had an experience with a "slack" starter batter, which I mix at 100% hydration, and ferment for 12 hours. The formula was 103 oz. flour and water, and 2tsps. instant yeast. I used tepid water, and left it at room temperature for about 12 hours, that being around 65-70 degrees. The next day, I noticed it had not risen very far, and fell quickly when I moved the vessel it was in. When I went to scoop some out for the first batch of bread, it seemed "slack" -- very sloppy and loose, with a bit of water seeping in at the bottom, as if it had over-risen and the gluten had broken. It didn't seem to have any elasticity, just watery sloppiness! The only thing I did differently was to mix this batch with a wire whip at medium speed about 2 minutes (I usually just use my bare hand to mix and incorporate all the water in the flour, and it usually has some lumps), which left the batter very smooth. Any thoughts?

 

Since no one else is jumping in to help -- your polish formula looks just like mine.  Though larger by an order of magnitude.  The time and temperature seem OK.  I believe you are correct that the poolish had over developed, I have seen that "watery sloppiness" myself when my poolish has gone for a couple days.

 

The question is, why did this happen?  My guess is that you developed the gluten by beating it for two minutes.  I always mix my poolish gently by hand.

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Sounds good! I had hoped to avoid some sticky hands by using a machine -- maybe Grandma's way is the best! Thanks for your reply.


Lizz

---

"you miss 100% of the shots you don't take"

-Wayne Gretzky

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I have attempted two starters so far and they both broke day 3. I have been using a hand whisk. I will try mixing it gently by hand and see if I get better results. What else could cause the dough system to break?

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