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Katie Meadow

Bonal Gentiane-Quina

75 posts in this topic

Marketing Department - ha! There's nothing corporate with this one. For those not following the thread, in disclosure I speak as representative for the importer into the USA. This is/was the 1890's label that was to be replaced by the key in the golden age (20's - 30's) for Quinquina. The blossom label in the picture was for us to be a special edition, but now we'll keep it sometimes available along with the key label. Same juice inside both.

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I do have to say I like that label, though.


Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

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Tonight I made the Gilliland from Anfora for my husband. It is like a simplified version of the Bonal and Rye without the Cointreau or Angostura bitters.

2 oz Rittenhouse rye

1 oz Bonal

2 dashes orange bitters (I used Regan and Angostura orange bitters)

brandied cherry

6814656064_21e699981c_z.jpg

It was not bad but we decided that we liked the Bonal & Rye better (a little more balanced/less intense).

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(from the "Cocktails I'm supposed to like, but don't" thread)

My favorite Boulevardier variant (and better than the original in my opinion) is this one from Kindred Cocktails:

Boulevardier Riff (Fred Sarkis)
by Fred Sarkis, Sable Kitchen & Bar, Chicago, IL
1 1/2 oz Bourbon, WL Weller
3/4 oz Cynar
3/4 oz Bonal Gentiane Quina
1 pn Salt (small amount)
2 ds Orange bitters

Stir, strain, straight up, cocktail glass

It moves pretty far away from the original but damn it's good.

That looks good (no Campari though, so not really a Boulevardier per se). I am always on the lookout for good cocktails using Bonal and may try this one tonight. The bourbon + bonal combo reminds me of the Mountain Man, but I digress...

It is indeed excellent and surprisingly crisp for a brown, bitter and stirred cocktail. I forgot the salt and did not add it until the end.

8599512208_0d88254865_z.jpg


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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I don't think I ever put this up here, but on my last visit to Seattle in May 2012, we visited Murray at Canon.

He made us a flight of manhattans. All three were 2:1 rye to vermouth, 2 dashes ango, lemon peel. I can't remember what rye, but the vermouths were carpano antica, dolin rouge, and bonal. Without knowing what was what, I picked the bonal one as the clear favorite. And Antica (or Cocchi di Torino) is generally my favorite in everything.

Gonna have to try the rye/cynar/bonal combo next.

I've also dug the "rope burn" which is 1:1:1 smith&cross/aperol/bonal - grapefruit peel. delicious.

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Haven't tried it yet, but this looks good...

by Leo Robitschek, Eleven Madison Mark, NYC.
2 oz Bonal Gentiane Quina
1/2 oz Peychaud's Bitters
1/4 oz Maraschino Liqueur
1/2 oz Lemon juice
1 twst Lemon peel
Dry shake and pour into a sugar-rimmed, curshed ice-filled cocktail glass. Lemon peel garnish.
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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Speaking of Bonal, last night I tried Jeff Hollinger's Whimsy Shim. Bonal as the base, with dry vermouth and Calvados to up the flavor and richness, bitters (I went with Miracle Mile forbidden bitters).

He says you can use half Lillet half Carpano Antica and a dash of bitters, if you don't have Bonal.

10987496785_91e923dc1c_z.jpg

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Sounds good. Where's the recipe?

Nice twist btw.


Edited by Rafa (log)
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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Thanks. That's at the top of my cocktail book to-buy list.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Tonight I had a Bicycle Thief, a Manhattan variation & close relative of the Little Italy, with rye (I used Rittenhouse 101), sweet vermouth (Cocchi vermouth di Torino), Cynar, and Bonal. Great showcase for the Rittenhouse rye, with a lovely bitter orange flavor, plus caramel and herbs in the finish. I did not do a side-by-side, but purely from memory, I think I may prefer it to a Little Italy.

11163293916_cbc6ef76d7_z.jpg

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Not enough Bonal love. I am still working on the same bottle which, miraculously, still tastes fine (I keep it in the fridge and purge the headspace after every use with inert gas).

 

Yesterday I was looking for rye + Bonal combos and was every excited to find a recipe that also includes falernum. With homemade falernum this is great. A very aromatic, somewhat tropical Manhattan, with orange and spice notes and a long finish. I only used 1/4 ounces of falernum because the homemade stuff (Elmegirab recipe) is very concentrated. I added 1/8 oz of simple to compensate for the decreased amount of falernum, but it did not really need it.

 

No. 65: rye (Bulleit), Bonal, falernum (homemade), Angostura and orange (Fee) bitters.

 

12918545195_31de18ff2e_z.jpg
 


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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I too found it very caramel-y last time I made it (which is sort of what I was going for originally, but still). I thought it could benefit from something lighter--I tried Wray & Nephew in place of the S&C, which worked somewhat. As it is I would make it for someone who likes very dark flavors. 

 

Thank you for keeping this thread alive and reminding me that I need to use my Bonal more. I've found that it adds bitterness and interest in drinks where Pineau des Charentes is called for, as it's basically a bittered and aromatized Pineau-type aperitif (lightly fermented grape must + brandy, barrel-aged). 


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I too found it very caramel-y last time I made it (which is sort of what I was going for originally, but still). I thought it could benefit from something lighter--I tried Wray & Nephew in place of the S&C, which worked somewhat. As it is I would make it for someone who likes very dark flavors. 

 

I was in the mood for dark flavors that night so it worked for me.

 

Thank you for keeping this thread alive and reminding me that I need to use my Bonal more. I've found that it adds bitterness and interest in drinks where Pineau des Charentes is called for, as it's basically a bittered and aromatized Pineau-type aperitif (lightly fermented grape must + brandy, barrel-aged).

You are welcome, and thanks for the tip. I am now scouting the Kindred Cocktails database for drinks with Pineau des Charentes so I can try them with Bonal...

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I think it works well in a Pompadour riff, with the Martinique rhum cut with Jamaican rum to play off its affinity for Bonal. Something like:

 

1 1/2 oz Bonal Gentiane Quina
3/4 oz Rhum Agricole
3/4 oz Jamaican rum
1/4 oz Lemon juice (or more to taste)
1-2 dash Bittermens Xocolatl Mole
Lemon twist.

This is basically a Pompadour crossed with slkinsey's equal parts Bonal/Smith & Cross drink from upthread. 
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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Thank you for keeping this thread alive and reminding me that I need to use my Bonal more. I've found that it adds bitterness and interest in drinks where Pineau des Charentes is called for, as it's basically a bittered and aromatized Pineau-type aperitif (lightly fermented grape must + brandy, barrel-aged). 

 

I regularly sub Bonal for sweet vermouth to good effect but I don't think I ever quite made the connection to that ambrosia of the gods, Pineau des Charentes, and the other vin de liqueurs. I think I am going to have to explore that Pompadour riff this weekend!


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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I think it works well in a Pompadour riff, with the Martinique rhum cut with Jamaican rum to play off its affinity for Bonal. Something like:

 

1 1/2 oz Bonal Gentiane Quina
3/4 oz Rhum Agricole
3/4 oz Jamaican rum
1/4 oz Lemon juice (or more to taste)
1-2 dash Bittermens Xocolatl Mole
Lemon twist.

This is basically a Pompadour crossed with slkinsey's equal parts Bonal/Smith & Cross drink from upthread. 

 

 

I tried it. The Bonal and lemon juice (I used 1/4 oz) managed to overwhelm the two beautiful rums I used (Saint James Hors d'Age and Appleton 12). So, I don't know, maybe someone should try with less Bonal and report. :wink:

 

14248523175_61a7abb433_z.jpg

 


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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Oh dear. Not surprised that those lovely, subtle rums got clobbered by Bonal. I was thinking more Smith & Cross than Appleton's. Sorry to mislead!


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Oops. S&C vs. Appleton - two completely different beasts of course...

 

I am curious to see what tanstaafl2 comes up with over the weekend.

Finally got a chance to play a little last night. First I started with the baseline above with St. James Hors d'Age and Appleton 12. A very pleasant drink but the rums did indeed seem to get a bit lost under the thumb of the Bonal.

Then I moved on to a version with St. James but subbed the S&C for the Appleton. Definitely an improvement that gives the rum a fighting chance and seemed to bring the drink into better balance.

Finally I kept the S&C but exchanged Depaz for the St James. It is younger and a bit more "brash" than the older and more subtle St. James Hors d'Age in my opinion and seemed like it might be a good fit here. I thought it worked the best. Not a huge difference but it worked for me.

Bonal Pompadour riff edited.jpg

Not a drink for a subtle spirit to be sure!


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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