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Charcuterie Index

1 post in this topic

(NB: This comprehensive index was prepared by Chris Hennes.)

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Charcuterie

The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing

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Michael Ruhlman and Brian Polcyn

Published by W. W. Norton (November 21, 2005)

Forward by Thomas Keller

The original "Cooking (or curing) from Charcuterie" topic is one of the all-time most popular topics on the eGullet forums, and the depth and breadth of information in it is truly astonishing. What follows is a list of commonly asked questions with links to the post (or posts) that best answer the inquiry. In addition we are providing a table of contents below with links to some of the most thorough results posts for each recipe.

The original topic has been closed, and as discussion continues on this new topic, we ask that posters keep their posts focused on recipes and techniques from the book itself, and small modifications to those recipes. As this book seems to have sparked (or at least fanned the flames!) of a tremendous amount of interest in charcuterie, most individual charcuterie items have other topics devoted to them: you can use the eGullet forums search engine top help you find the best place for your post.

Thanks, and happy curing!

Other Charcuterie-related Topics to Consult

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Topic Index

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Frequently Asked Questions

Salt Curing FAQs

General Sausage FAQs

Dry-Curing FAQs

Equipment FAQs

Mold FAQs

Smoking FAQs

Misc. FAQs

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Miscellaneous Information

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Table of Contents (with links to a few detailed posts)

NOTE ABOUT POST SELECTION: The most appropriate post from the original topic was chosen to represent each recipe. Criteria for selection: 1) Includes photos, 2) is a recipe from Charcuterie with only minor modifications, and 3) is well-documented. Nominations for recipe analysis posts (from either the original topic or the new one) should be PM'ed to Chris Hennes or any other Kitchen Forum host.

1. Introduction

2. Recipes for Salt-Cured Food

3. Recipes for Smoked Food

4. Sausages

5. Recipes for Dry-Cured Food

6. Pâtés and Terrines

7. The Confit Technique

  • Duck confit with clove (p. 259)
  • Duck confit with star anise and ginger (p. 261)
  • Goose confit (p. 261)
  • Pork confit (p. 263)
  • Pork belly confit (p. 264)
  • Classic pork rillettes (p. 267)
  • Smoked trout rillettes (p. 269)
  • Mediteranean olive and vegetable rillettes (p. 270)
  • Rillettes from confit (p. 272)
  • Onion confit (p. 273)
  • Tomato confit (p. 274)

8. Recipes to Accompany Charcuterie

  • Basic Mayonnaise (p. 277)
  • Aïoli (p. 278)
  • Rémoulade (p. 279)
  • Sauce Gribiche (p. 280)
  • Cucumber Dill Relish (p. 281)
  • Smoked Tomato and Corn Salsa (p. 282)
  • Tart Cherry Mustard (p. 283)
  • Green Chile Mustard (p. 284)
  • Caraway-Beer Mustard (p. 284)
  • Basic Vinaigrette (p. 285)
  • Russian Dressing (p. 287)
  • Chipotle Barbeque Sauce (p. 287)
  • Carolina-Style Barbecue Sauce (p. 288)
  • Cumberland Sauce (p. 289)
  • Orange-Ginger Sauce (p. 290)
  • Horseradish Cream Sauce (p. 290)
  • Basil Cream Sauce (p. 291)
  • Spicy Tomato Chutney (p. 292)
  • Corn Relish (p. 293)
  • Green Tomato Relish (p. 294)
  • Onion-Raisin Chutney (p. 295)
  • Bourbon Glaze (p. 295)
  • Marinated Olives (p. 296)
  • German Potato Salad (p. 297)
  • Sweet Pickle Chips (p. 298)

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