Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Dianabanana

[blank] Diane

Recommended Posts

I recently discovered the existence of Gateau Diane (sort of like a chocolate pavlova). And then of course we have Steak Diane.

Suppose I wanted to cook an eponymous meal--what else could I make? In a fit of egocentricity, I poked around on Google but couldn't be sure if what I saw was actually a standard dish that I've just never heard of, or something that only one family happens to call ___ Diane. I'm looking only for widely recognized dishes. Can you think of any others?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe you could develop a Banana Diana.


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Hotel St. Francis Cook Book, by Victor Hirtzler (1919) has these:

Consommé Diane. Take any game bird, such as grouse, partridge, quail, pheasant or guinea hen, and roast just enough to give a color. Then put in soup stock and boil until soft. Clarify the broth with chopped beef, and strain. Cut the breast out of the bird, cut in small squares, and serve in the consommé. Add some dry sherry wine and a little Cayenne pepper before serving.

Poached eggs, Diane. Line a tartelette mould with paste and fill with raw white beans to support the walls, and bake in oven. Then throw out the beans and fill with tomatoes sauté in butter, place a poached egg on top, cover with Hollandaise sauce, and put in hot oven for a second.

There's a Canapes Diane too - but I am not sure of the "recipe" - chicken livers, I think.


Edited by The Old Foodie (log)

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At a rehearsal dinner for a wedding, they served Grapes Diane. They were really good (the best thing on the buffet). Tiny little champagne grapes with a creamy sweet and sour dressing. It was somewhere between a cole slaw dressing and a bottled poppy-seed dressing.


"Life is a combination of magic and pasta." - Frederico Fellini

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In classical cuisine "Diane" usually referred to some connection with hunting, after the goddess Diana, the huntress

Thus Sauce Diane orginally served with venison (Poivrade- pepper with cream), but served with steak to give steak Diane

Dishes with game forcemeat are a la Diane (eg canapes, or eggs a la Diane are soft poached eggs with a game puree on toast), or Potage a la Diane is a game , lentil and cream soup

Dishes with Sauce Chasseur can also be described as Diane

Quails a la Diane are simmered in stock, served with tomato demi-glace, garnished with quenelle and braised lettuce (Larousse)


Edited by jackal10 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You already have enough to craft a beautifully narcissistic menu for a dinner party.

I do! Fabulous--thanks everyone! I never knew there were so many.

Emilyr, how were those grapes served?


Edited by Dianabanana (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You already have enough to craft a beautifully narcissistic menu for a dinner party.

I do! Fabulous--thanks everyone! I never knew there were so many.

Emilyr, how were those grapes served?

They were just a salad/side dish. It was buffet style, so they were in a big hotel pan.


"Life is a combination of magic and pasta." - Frederico Fellini

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...