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piazzola

radicchio

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very bitter leaves?

Is there a way to remove or mask the bitterness

I grew up with radicchio o radicheta along with other Mediterranean vegies growing wild in the paddocks so many good memories even thistle, cardo or cardune simply delicious.

But coming back to this vegie I have never consider eating the outer leathery leaves.

I tried with melting cheese and oven baked not my cup of tea.

Any other suggestions.Thanks :rolleyes:

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very bitter leaves?

Is there a way to remove or mask the bitterness

I grew up with radicchio o radicheta along with other Mediterranean vegies growing wild in the paddocks so many good memories even thistle, cardo or cardune simply delicious.

But coming back to this vegie I have never consider eating the outer leathery leaves.

I tried with melting cheese and oven baked not my cup of tea.

Any other suggestions.Thanks :rolleyes:

Slicing it thinly and dressing it with oil and basamic, some warmed pinenuts is good.

Or wilting it with some proscuitto and garlic and having it with fettuccine balances it.

I have heard of some flouring it with icing sugar before basting it with balsamic before roasting but to me part of its joy is the bitterness - it shouldn't be too bitter, it may have been hanging around too long.

there is also an excellent red wine and radicchio risotto with some blue cheese to be done.


Edited by beepop (log)

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Radicchio is one of my very favorite vegetables. I usually use the round kind since that's what is most often available, or more rarely treviso. In Venice I saw several kinds I had never seen before--some wild and twisty ones. Cooking radicchio, especially with a little garlic, seems to take the edge off the bitterness, but that bitter taste is part of the appeal.

I shred radicchio and throw it into risotto about ten minutes before it's done. I briefly saute it w/minced garlic and top a pizza halfway through the cooking time. I quarter it and marinate it in balsamic vinegar (actually I use a relatively cheap red vinegar and add some balsamic), olive oil, salt and pepper for about half an hour then grill it slowly on the bbq until the edges are a little charred.

But my standby--and the easiest way--is a simple saute. I cut it roughly and separate the leaves, then saute it in olive oil for two or three minutes on modest heat, add salt and pepper. Another minute and I add a couple of minced garlic cloves. When it is tender, only another couple of minutes more, I finish it with a splash of balsamic and serve it up. If you find it too bitter for your taste, use a sweet balsamic vinegar. I sometimes like to use a fig balsamic. It's a five minute side-dish!

I've never added prosciutto or pine nuts but that sounds good. Just tossing on a handful of toasted pine nuts would dress it up a little. Eating it on pasta sounds great too. I've seen traditional recipes that pair it with balsamic vinegar and raisins but I'm not into cooked raisins.

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One of the most memorable dishes I've ever had with radicchio involved it being sauteed with jumbo lump crab meat. It was delicious. Not quite sure how it was made, but it was an excellent presentation.


Katie M. Loeb
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Thank you all for your replies

I also tend to agree slicing it thin and stir fry until wilted may be an option for the outer leaves.

I look at pinenuts as kind of optional ingredient thought here is an expensive one.

Also I do not agree in adding crab it's way too expensive to justify using the outer leaves.

Balsamic is not one of fav vinegards and never been however it is the sweetest especially if a good one is used. I just happen to have an open bottle and should use it before it goes weak.

Never liked that much rice dishes but when it comes to prosciutto which ham are you suggesting raw or cooked cured ham? To me perhaps streaky bacon may be better because of the fat.

And then I agree some pasta may go well with the wilted rad...


Edited by piazzola (log)

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I recently sliced radicchio leaves chiffonade-thin and used them to top mashed white beans (with some good olive oil and a bit of crushed garlic to facilitate the mashing) on bruschetta. An idea from London's Rver cafe --and Fabulous.

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As I said before I am used to bitter vegies and rad is just one of them But as I hate wasting the outer leaves I thought to look for ideas to use them for something else.

hathor gave me a good tip and will use it soon.

caseyell beans on toast doesn't sound too fancy although I must admit using rad as sprinkles I like sprinkles!

Thanks

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