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stuart_s

Serving mochi

2 posts in this topic

So, I'm going to try making coconut mochi. I'm going to use this recipe. It seems just simple enough that I can manage it. I'm not very adept in the kitchen. Anyhoo...

How should I serve it? I was thinking of kinako (rice powder?) if I can find it. Barley malt. Red beans. Fresh fruit.

Besides that I was considering condensed milk. Is all condensed milk the same?

I once had eight (seven? nine?) treasure rice at a Chinese restaurant, seemingly filled with all sorts of fruits, beans and jellies. I've had ice kacang (Malaysian dessert) which had a slightly different assortment of little sweet mystery objects mixed with ice and condensed milk. I think Koreans have a similar dessert. I had a dessert-slash-beverage at a Vietnamese restaurant which had all sorts of unfamiliar things floating in it.

Intuitively, these items seem related to my mochi but I'm way out of my area of expertise here. I could be catastrophically mistaken.

Anyway, what do you think that I should put on top of my mochi? Uniquely Hawaiian ideas are appreciated as are ideas from Japan and beyond.

Thank you.

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Chichi dango (what the recipe calls "coconut mochi") are more Japanese than Hawaiian, and they're usually just cut into small rectangles (a little bigger than a domino), picked up with one's fingers, and eaten. The dough can be tinted with food coloring, so that half the pieces are pale pink and the others are left white.

I've never had them served with anything except a cup of green tea. (The ordinary kind--not tea ceremony tea.)


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

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