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ChristopherMichael

Wybauw Class

34 posts in this topic

Tammy

There are also several 3 day classes over the summer at the callebaut Academy in Chicago this summer at 1/2 the price ($580). You might also consider those.


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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Tammy

There are also several 3 day classes over the summer at the callebaut Academy in Chicago this summer at 1/2 the price ($580). You might also consider those.

Thanks Mark. I've sent off a request for information.


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Tammy

There are also several 3 day classes over the summer at the callebaut Academy in Chicago this summer at 1/2 the price ($580). You might also consider those.

Thanks Mark. I've sent off a request for information.

Go tothe online site, www.callebaut.com/usen/1694

the Chocolate Academy


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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I attended the class last week, it was fantastic. I would recommend anyone thinking about to, it is worth the cost.The man is a wealth of knowledge. I don't really have anything to add about techniques that haven't been already posted.

There has been a discussion off and on through several thread about whether to use tempered chocolate in making ganache. Wybauw stressed the importance for these reasons:

-there is less of a flavor loss

-improved mouth sensation /less granular taste

-longer shelf life

-more shiney

-structure is a lot more stable

-slows dehydration

-less oil migration (could lead to fat bloom)

-firmer to cut (slabs)

He made 2 slab with and without tempering. The one with untempered chocolate was soft and hard to manipulate to use a guitar. the slab made with tempered chocolate was firm and very easy to cut.


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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i attended a course in wieze, and i have to say that i learned a lot. our course was about "new recipes and techniques" but jean pierre told us that he likes to do the "beginners course" a lot more since he has a much more time to explain the theoretical side and go much deeper into detail. concerning the use of tempered chocolate i was under the impression that he thinks its most important to successfully precrystallize the ganache not by necessarily using tempered ganache, but to take the ganache to a point where it begins to crystallize before putting it into a frame. when i did it his way i was able to cut a ganache (NOT a butter ganache) that was only 1 1/2 hours old...

i have made zillions of photos of the session but never really made it to u/l them here yet :-(

cheers

t.

p.s. ...and YES if you have the chance seeing the old man go for it, he well passed his 60st birthday!


Edited by schneich (log)

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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I took a class with him at Ewald Notter's school in Orlando. Was it worth it? YES!! I learned so much and had a blast. I'm seriously considering taking it again (but I'll probably take Schott's class instead).

Dan

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I took a class with him at Ewald Notter's school in Orlando.  Was it worth it?  YES!!  I learned so much and had a blast.  I'm seriously considering taking it again (but I'll probably take Schott's class instead).

Dan

Same here, took a class at the Notter School. He is a living legend of our industry and one of the nicest people as well. You can learn a lot from the class but if you take questions about your own situation...he is a fountain of knowledge. He makes everything look so effortless...you can learn just watching his movements.

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i attended a course in wieze, and i have to say that i learned a lot. our course was about "new recipes and techniques" but jean pierre told us that he likes to do the "beginners course" a lot more since he has a much more time to explain the theoretical side and go much deeper into detail. concerning the use of tempered chocolate i was under the impression that he thinks its most important to successfully precrystallize the ganache not by necessarily using tempered ganache, but to take the ganache to a point where it begins to crystallize before putting it into a frame. when i did it his way i was able to cut a ganache (NOT a butter ganache) that was only 1 1/2 hours old...

i have made zillions of photos of the session but never really made it to u/l them here yet :-(

cheers

t.

p.s. ...and YES if you have the chance seeing the old man go for it, he well passed his 60st birthday!

You are right, I did not state that correctly. He wanted the ganache to be tempered as an end result by getting it to start to precrystalize. Then working it to end up with a tempered ganache. But by using tempered chocolate, wouldn't the net result be the same


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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he had me remove a perfect shiny ganache from a frame, letting it crystallize in the fridge and when it already started to firm up at the edge of the bowl carefully mix it and again put it in a frame, it was cutable an hour later. if i didnt do it, it would have easily taken 24h to crystallize...

usually one of the big rules is that thou shall never mix a ganache once its below 35c or it will split on you. on the other hand there are recipes that you can even whip up. WHAT ingredient or formula makes a ganache tolerate whipping without splitting...

cheers

t.


toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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