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Mallet

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Everything posted by Mallet

  1. This article clinched the Kuhn Rikon for me, as I am primarily planning to use it for stocks and stews. I went with the 8 Qt Duromatic, should be getting it in a few weeks.
  2. Another option, if you have an electric stove, would be to install a PID and temp probe to one of your elements (link to previous thread).
  3. I just picked up a copy yesterday. I had only heard of Momofuku on eGullet in passing, but the book immediately drew me in and I felt compelled to buy it. Can't wait to start cooking from it.
  4. I'd like to try curing a Canada Goose breast. Canada Geese are much leaner than domestic ducks (nearly no fat), and the meat is much darker- almost like beef. I'm not sure that that the duck prosciutto recipe would be appropriate, perhaps a bresaola cure would be better?
  5. Mallet

    Wild Game Cookery

    That's really cool! I see that Spruce Grouse is more closely related to Willow Ptarmigan than it is to Ruffed Grouse. I've eaten Spruce Grouse before, and it is also dark meated, probably not entirely unlike Ptarmigan. The individual I sampled had probably been eating conifer needles, since it had pronounced but not unpleasant spruce undertones. The only other grouse species I've had is Blue Grouse, which was intermediate in color between Ruffed Grouse and Spruce Grouse. Ruffed grouse is actually my least favourite of the bunch (being very relative, since they're all delicious), precisely beca
  6. For the food that I eat at home I'd say we are pretty good locavores. By that I mean if there's a local alternative we usually by it. Using Ontario as my local area and the same breakdown as Chris: Produce: Highly dependent on season. I'd say we fluctuate between 50-80%. As with Chris, bananas are a big outlier as are clementines in the winter. In general though, we buy very few citrus. Fresh herbs are possibly grown in province, although I confess I don't check. In the winter, we eat a lot of root vegetables. Meat, Poultry, & Fish: 90% local. We buy very little fish (mostly wild sockeye s
  7. The prices for SVM seem to be creeping up, with the 2 models going for $140 and $170. You should easily be able to get a used immersion circulator for that price or less (especially factoring in the extra cost of a large rice cooker or roasting pans etc..). I bought a mint-condition, perfectly clean analog circulator for about $120. For the price, SVM is not worth it IMO.
  8. Mallet

    Pressure Cooked Stock

    Ok, I'm sold. DEATH TO SKIMMING!!
  9. Mallet

    Wild Game Cookery

    We're starting to build up our wild edibles inventory for the annual game dinner. We had one good day of Canada goose hunting, which yielded us 5 geese (without any decoys or calls, mind you), and we're planning to up the ante on the small mammal front in the next few weeks. So far, we have: -4 Canada geese: breasts, legs, and carcasses separated -2 ruffed grouse: boneless, skinless -Deer: I believe it's some pieces of an old-ish buck -2 mallards: whole -2 wood ducks: whole -2 squirrels: whole -1 large halibut fillet -1 sockeye salmon fillet -dried morels and chanterelles -sour cherries, and
  10. Congratulations to the Atelier team! I hope to return this winter when I'm visiting family.
  11. On that note, the adductor mussel on oysters is super-tasty when raw. Next time you shuck some oysters scrape off the bits on adductor muscle left on the upper shell and taste it, it's impossibly sweet.
  12. Mallet

    My first spit-roast

    Well, the big day has come and gone, and the pig roast was quite a success! I don't really have much to add to the procedure given above, except that we added sheet metal to the bottom of the baskets to help build up the ash/heat. I think our efficiency of wood usage roughly doubled as a result. The pig took about 9 hours to finish (it was roughly 100 lbs dressed).
  13. Mallet

    Wild Game Cookery

    Wow, that looks fantastic! How big are scottish grouse compared to, say, ruffed grouse (or perhaps blue grouse, which I think are more common on the west coast)?
  14. Sounds like a great experiment! Too bad I'm allergic to mussels ... I've never tried pickled oysters, perhaps I'll try a similar experiment over the christmas holidays when I have ad lib oysters...
  15. Mallet

    Wild Game Cookery

    Hunting season has started in Ontario. Hopefully I'll have something to post in the coming days/weeks/months
  16. I purchased the bucket less than 2 years ago, and probably used it less than 10 times. Is it possible that the sanitizer could have weakened the plastic? I was mixing up big batches of Diversol and immersing my bottles in the bucket before starting a batch (I'm switching to another sanitizer though, as Diversol seems to basically be powdered bleach and the price recently doubled).
  17. I haven't eaten out much lately, but I think a lot of the old recommendations on this thread still stand. If you like Cambodian/Thai food then Cambodiana or Cambodian Village are both good places worth checking out for lunch. Pan Chancho is another good place for lunch, as is the smoked cod fish 'n' chips at the Pilot House. You mught want to check out Luke's for dinner since you missed out last time. Luke was recently featured in Toronto Life (link). Aqua Terra should still be a good bet. As for new places, I don't think there are that many in the downtown core (Olivea is on the market squa
  18. Speaking of weakened buckets, I recently left home for about a few weeks and left a batch of beer behind, When I came back I found the apartment smelling a little yeasty and my bucket standing in a pool of beer! Cracks had started to form on the bottom rim. Fortunately, I only lost about 1L to the floor (I threw out the remaining for fear of contamination). Is this a common occurrence with plastic buckets?
  19. I've noticed that vacuum-packing my sausages and letting them sit in the fridge for a month or two (or more) dramatically improves their flavour. It's hard to resist eating everything right away, though.
  20. Wild game loves sous-vide! Here's a link to a game dinner I made last spring, most of the meat was cooked sous-vide.
  21. Well, it's not that far removed from hodge podge, minus the cream
  22. Mallet

    My first spit-roast

    I agree that catching the drippings would be great, but I'm not too sure how to implement it. The pan would have to be huge to catch all the drippings, and how would you keep all the ash from the fire out?
  23. Mallet

    My first spit-roast

    By all means! Unfortunately, I didn't get any pictures of the lamb because I was busy carving it. I would say this is pretty close. I didn't really have much to do with the details of the event, but I think my dad managed to pick up a whole lamb at the local SuperStore (the Barrington St. one, for the Haligonians out there: they have a great meat counter). It was definitely Nova Scotia lamb, which is primarily marketed through the Northumberland Lamb Co-op.
  24. I'm prone to not really thinking ahead and to making grandiose plans, but sometimes people actually indulge me. For example, when I decided to handle the food for my wedding, no one objected. Why on earth would I do such a thing? Mostly, because it's a fun, informal family gathering and northern NB has not much by way of catering (to my knowledge). We're also doing all the decorations, handling accommodations for guests etc..., but that's another story. We decided to go the spit-roast route, and rather than buy a commercial rig, we decided to design a spit and have it made for us locally. My d
  25. Holy F**k! 5690 mg of sodium is 14,225 mg of salt! That's like two tablespoons of Diamond Crystal Kosher salt per portion! !!!! (for emphasis)
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