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SWISS_CHEF

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Everything posted by SWISS_CHEF

  1. As I see it, there are two kinds of people in this world, the "givers" and the "takers". The former being vastly out-numbered by the latter. Babbette's Feast was an extraordinary movie about an extraordinary person and (for me) was a shining example for the "giving" people of this world. Preparing food is all about giving to others. If you doubt that, you will never be a "real" chef. Sorry, I'm preaching. I suppose that is why we all are here on eGullet.... to support and nourish one another, even though we may be a half a world away.
  2. SWISS_CHEF

    Lebanese wines

    I have a friend that, because of these dumb periods, will only buy his best Barolo directly from the wine maker so that he can call him back and ask if it is ok to drink. He says it happens very often that the wine maker tells him to wait a year and call him back.
  3. SWISS_CHEF

    Lebanese wines

    In Switzerland we can find: Kefraya Kouruom Ksara and Musar Of the famous Lebanese wines I have only tried Musar. I have been enjoying Musar since the very early 70's vintages which I bought back in the late 80's. Of all the Musars I have tried the the '78 stands out the most in my memory. In fact I gave an interview to the Kansas City Star back in '89 and I strongly recommended the wine to the readers. Oddly enough, several of my wine drinking friends criticized my recommendation and said it was a "funky" wine that would only appeal to a very limited market. I still maintain my original opinion of the wine, I think the "Château Musar" is usually an outstanding wine. I feel the "Tradition" label lacks the power of it's big brother so I don't buy it. I see they are even making a "Musar Jeune" bottled within 2 months but I have not tried it. Edit: As I reflect on Musar I think it might have been the 79 not the 78 that I liked best but either way both were drinking VERY well in the early 90's. From the 79 I remember the horse-stable and leather nose like it was only yesterday. Only one other wine is as equally seared into my memory...the 1985 Beaucastel. Bravo! What a pleasure it must have been to blow against the bitter winds of policy and government and sample the forbidden fruits of your neighbor's land.
  4. I slice them when they are cold but I serve all my saucission sec and jambon sec at room temperature, patés too, the same goes for all my Italian salumi. Additionally: I think cheeses are always best at room temperature. I can't think of anything that I serve directly from the fridge including white wine but having said that, I drink red wines cooler than room temperature but warmer than the whites. I drink some very young fruity reds as cold as a white wine in Summer.
  5. Beautiful! And I love the old cutting board too! Question: did the hazelnut saucission have a very strong pork flavor? I wonder if it is traditionally made in a milder style in order to not over-power the hazelnuts?
  6. I had a pony and a rabbit when I was a kid and in fact I have tried both and found both to be delicious....but....I really don't "enjoy" eating them. I don't have a psychological commitment to beef or pork (see, I call them beef and pork not cows and pigs) I guess that makes me a hypocrite and I suppose I should be more practical and open minded but I'm not. By the way...I will not eat live monkey brains or testicals from any species and countless other similar things.....I guess I'm not an "eat everything I can get my hands on" type of guy. Funny though...I am still challenged by food and enjoy the pursuit of the few things I am willing to eat. Edit...my name actually is Ed and I have been called Mr. Ed for nearly 40 years now.
  7. SWISS_CHEF

    Australian Wines

    Cool! I have always disregarded the regulations and just shipped the stuff. I doubt they will throw us in jail.
  8. I googled Cavaillon asparagus and got this. Hijack away! Its all good! No but....hmmm why not?? I have some nice dried French flagolets in the celler! Maybe its time to experiment! Almass are you living in France?
  9. SWISS_CHEF

    Australian Wines

    Thanks Rebel Rose, Maybe I should send PCL a bottle of the Deakin I'm drinking, there may be a difference. I'm pretty sure I'm not crazy! What do you think PCL... you send me something interesting and I'll send you one of my Deakins?
  10. I know exactly what you are talking about and I will get the name the next time I'm over there.
  11. Hi Almass, Thanks for the kind words. Do you know where the asparagus you bought are from? We get Greek and Spanish here too but I never buy them. They look good but they are always tough and flavorless. I only buy German or Alsatian. However....I did hear they are growing them in Cavaillon and if they do to the asparagus what they do to the melons..... we've got it made!
  12. SWISS_CHEF

    Australian Wines

    I tried this wine back in '03 and Mr. Idle's review is spot on!
  13. Thanks Lucy, These were just typical grocery store saucission nothing rare or special. I wish I could have poked around at some butchers for some really special ones but I didn't have the time. However, number 1 and 2 were very good indeed. Most were priced around €23/kilo The wine is Les Domaniers de Puits Mouret, Selection Ott, Cotes de Provence and about €11 here in Switzerland and it went very well with the saucission. Because of the amount of fat and the sort of gamey smell and taste in the saucission, I like a dry medium weight French red with good mineral quality to it. I don't really think big, plummy New World wines go with French saucission. A Jura or Alsatian white works too, if it is bone dry and concentrated.
  14. We went to a 'Rond Point' grocery store in France today and picked out five different saucission sec and decided to do a little tasting. Here are the results. The saucission were: 1. Calixte "Domaine de Mezenc. 2. Calixte '1859'. 3. Saucission sec du Sanglier - wild boar (sorry I didn't save the brand name). 4. Le Pui Zac (d' Auvergne). 5. Justin Bridou 'Le Baton de Berger aux Noisettrs, They are arranged in order going clockwise. the 'Le Baton de Berger aux Noisettes' at the bottom with the hazelnuts is number five. Tasting notes: 1. Calixte "Domaine de Mezenc: strong pork nose, dry and full flavored. We thought this was a very good saucisson. 2.Calixte '1859': hard and quite dry, clean pork nose but lighter and more complex and refined than number 1, this was our favorite of the group. 3. Saucission sec du Sanglier - wild boar (sorry I didn't save the brand name): closed but peppery nose. strong pepper quality....in fact, too much pepper and not enough pork flavor. 4. Le Pui Zac (d' Auvergne: It has a very strong dried pork nose. Salty and less refined than 1 or 2. 5. Justin Bridou 'Le Baton de Berger aux Noisettes: hazelnut nose but not enough flavor from the pork in my opinion. This saucission is not as good as 1,2 or 4 but the crunchy hazelnuts make it fun for an apero.
  15. SWISS_CHEF

    Australian Wines

    Its not available in Switzerland either. They only have 30 acres so maybe they sell all of their production in Australia.
  16. SWISS_CHEF

    Australian Wines

    Actually, I am in Switzerland but they sell well here too. I sell all the Deakins between 10.80 and 12 CHF (Swiss Francs and 1US$ equals 1.20 CHF) - Scotchman's Hill Dry Red (Claret) is N/A but the cheapest Scotchman's Hill red costs 22.30 CHF - Fox Creek Shadow's Run Shiraz Cabernet is N/A but the cheapest Fox Creek red is 24 CHF. - Penfold's Koonunga Hill costs 17-20 CHF - Wirra Wirra Church Block costs 19-32 CHF (different vintages) - Terra Felix Shiraz is N/A - The Procrastinator Cabernet Franc is N/A (Pricing source: Vinfox 2005) So the wines that you mention that are available here really aren't in the same price range as the Deakin Estate wines. However in your price range, I would re-mention the Thorn-Clarke "Shotfire Ridge" Shiraz. Parker rated the 2002 94 points and I sell Shotfire for 22.90 CHF.
  17. also, it should be noted that I let my batter sit for 10 or 15 minutes.
  18. I have seen these devices but it seems to me that they rely on gravity to work proprly and if that is the case then the dough is too thin. I find that it needs to be thicker and be forced through the holes or it becomes a big soggy mess in the boiling water.
  19. I have to agree with this one! Are you guys paying attention?
  20. The recipe Behemoth gave: 200 grams flour 2 eggs 1/2 tsp salt 5 tbsp water sounds fine… maybe you can add some baking soda if you like, but I don‘t ….a little nutmeg is a good idea too…. The mixture should be pretty dry…thicker than a milkshake for sure. I use an Ikea pasta colander with holes about the size of a pencil. Let the mixture drop through the colander bit by bit into boiling water (you should have to help it through with a rubber spatula). Let it cook for a minute then drain them and dump them into a greased casserole dish. Dot with butter and sprinkle with bread crumbs or poppy seeds and bake at a high temp until light brown. The finished product should be a little dry so it can absorb the sauce.
  21. I Realise there are a lot of Cognacs I can buy in France that never get exported to the States. But have any of you tried the Davidoff Classic or the Remey Martin Club? I think you should be able to find them in the States and I would be interested in your opinions.
  22. Hi Marsha, I have not run across the MM cigar here in Switzerland but did you notice post 3 in this thread? Regards, Ed
  23. Hi Robert, We are in a tiny village called Sulz half way between Zürich and Basel on the Rhein. If you are ever in the area drop me a line and we will link up. A couple of eGulleters live near by and we will use any excuse to get together and cook and eat.
  24. I am a Cognac and cigar lover but I am no expert, only a willing participant. I am fortunate to live in Switzerland where we have no trouble obtaining Cuban cigars and because I live near the border with France and Germany I have access to a very wide range of Cognacs and cigars. I don't spent a lot either.... the most expensive cognac is €44 ($60). The cigars are an even better value at less than a buck each, but I assure you they have been perfectly kept and are moist and fresh very nice to smoke. Here are the Cognacs that I have open at the moment They are (left to right) Beaubourg VSOP Jean Pierre Delatour XO Davidoff Classic Jules Gautret 3ème Reme Martin "Club" The Cigars are Guantanamera's , Compay and Dècimos (Cuban) So that's what I'm drinking and smoking.
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