Jump to content

Ellen Shapiro

eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • Content Count

    775
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Ellen Shapiro

  1. Having written two books about New York City (New York City with Kids and Relocating to New York) I can tell you that the value of a paid walking tour is not to be found in the food. You're paying for several things: The comfort level of knowing you won't get lost in an unfamiliar, scary, intimidating place. The time savings of having someone else do all the research. The expertise of the tour guide, who is a live person who can answer questions. Some people go on these tours in the hopes of meeting other travelers. Having grown up in the region I was never a "tour person" util I started worki
  2. Beer Shrimp While in China during my Seven Weeks in Tibet, one day on bikes ended at the cooking school. It was an optional activity, and I was tired, but I knew I had to do it for my fellow eGullet Society members. 200 g fish (firm white fish with skin on) 3 T peanut oil 1 tomato, chopped 1 red pepper, sliced 1 green pepper, sliced 2 T of sliced garlic tops or spring onion 25 g ginger, sliced 4 cloves garlic, crushed 2 T soy sauce 1 tsp salt 1 c beer Heat wok. Add oil and heat. Put fish into wok, skin side down. Put salt on top of fish and fry on each side for about 3 minutes or
  3. Beer Shrimp While in China during my Seven Weeks in Tibet, one day on bikes ended at the cooking school. It was an optional activity, and I was tired, but I knew I had to do it for my fellow eGullet Society members. 200 g fish (firm white fish with skin on) 3 T peanut oil 1 tomato, chopped 1 red pepper, sliced 1 green pepper, sliced 2 T of sliced garlic tops or spring onion 25 g ginger, sliced 4 cloves garlic, crushed 2 T soy sauce 1 tsp salt 1 c beer Heat wok. Add oil and heat. Put fish into wok, skin side down. Put salt on top of fish and fry on each side for about 3 minutes or
  4. Green Vegetables with Garlic While in China during my Seven Weeks in Tibet, one day on bikes ended at the cooking school. It was an optional activity, and I was tired, but I knew I had to do it for my fellow eGullet Society members. 1 bunch green vegetables 3 cloves crushed garlic 1 tsp salt 2 T water Heat wok. Add oil and heat oil. Add garlic, salt and greens. Stir fry. Add water and continue cooking for 2 minutes or until cooked. Any number of different green vegetables can be used including bok choy, spinach, snow peas, even green beans. We used a green leafy vegetable, which would ta
  5. Green Vegetables with Garlic While in China during my Seven Weeks in Tibet, one day on bikes ended at the cooking school. It was an optional activity, and I was tired, but I knew I had to do it for my fellow eGullet Society members. 1 bunch green vegetables 3 cloves crushed garlic 1 tsp salt 2 T water Heat wok. Add oil and heat oil. Add garlic, salt and greens. Stir fry. Add water and continue cooking for 2 minutes or until cooked. Any number of different green vegetables can be used including bok choy, spinach, snow peas, even green beans. We used a green leafy vegetable, which would ta
  6. Steamed Stuffed Pumpkin Blossons While in China during my Seven Weeks in Tibet, one day on bikes ended at the cooking school. It was an optional activity, and I was tired, but I knew I had to do it for my fellow eGullet Society members. 100 g minced pork 1/2 bunch chives, chopped (or spring onions or scallions) 1/2 teaspoon salt Pumpkin flowers Mix the minced pork (minced or finely chopped tofu is a tasty vegetarian alternative), salt and chives together. Stuff vegetables and steam for 15 minutes in a steamer (we used a bamboo steamer placed on top of a wok with water). Note: any edible
  7. Steamed Stuffed Pumpkin Blossons While in China during my Seven Weeks in Tibet, one day on bikes ended at the cooking school. It was an optional activity, and I was tired, but I knew I had to do it for my fellow eGullet Society members. 100 g minced pork 1/2 bunch chives, chopped (or spring onions or scallions) 1/2 teaspoon salt Pumpkin flowers Mix the minced pork (minced or finely chopped tofu is a tasty vegetarian alternative), salt and chives together. Stuff vegetables and steam for 15 minutes in a steamer (we used a bamboo steamer placed on top of a wok with water). Note: any edible
  8. Eggplant Yangshuo Style While in China during my Seven Weeks in Tibet, one day on bikes ended at the cooking school. It was an optional activity, and I was tired, but I knew I had to do it for my fellow eGullet Society members. Heat wok and add oil. Heat oil until smoking, then add eggplant and fry until browned and cooked through. Move eggplant to side, away from center of wok, reduce heat and fry garlic, ginger and pepper for one minute. Mix eggplant in with vegetables, salt, water and oyster sauce. Add spring onions and serve. Note: while we were cooking, all of our measurements were done b
  9. Eggplant Yangshuo Style While in China during my Seven Weeks in Tibet, one day on bikes ended at the cooking school. It was an optional activity, and I was tired, but I knew I had to do it for my fellow eGullet Society members. Heat wok and add oil. Heat oil until smoking, then add eggplant and fry until browned and cooked through. Move eggplant to side, away from center of wok, reduce heat and fry garlic, ginger and pepper for one minute. Mix eggplant in with vegetables, salt, water and oyster sauce. Add spring onions and serve. Note: while we were cooking, all of our measurements were done b
  10. Chicken with Cashews While in China during my Seven Weeks in Tibet, one day on bikes ended at the cooking school. It was an optional activity, and I was tired, but I knew I had to do it for my fellow eGullet Society members. 150 g chicken breast (boneless, skinless), thinly sliced 1/2 c roasted cashew nuts (if nuts are raw, as most nuts sold in China are, fry in a little oil first, which is what we did) 2 T peanut oil 4 cloves garlic, crushed 1 carrot, sliced 4 spring onions or garlic tops 2 T water 1 T soy sauce 1/2 T oyster sauce ½ teaspoon salt Heat wok and add half of the oil.
  11. Chicken with Cashews While in China during my Seven Weeks in Tibet, one day on bikes ended at the cooking school. It was an optional activity, and I was tired, but I knew I had to do it for my fellow eGullet Society members. 150 g chicken breast (boneless, skinless), thinly sliced 1/2 c roasted cashew nuts (if nuts are raw, as most nuts sold in China are, fry in a little oil first, which is what we did) 2 T peanut oil 4 cloves garlic, crushed 1 carrot, sliced 4 spring onions or garlic tops 2 T water 1 T soy sauce 1/2 T oyster sauce ½ teaspoon salt Heat wok and add half of the oil.
  12. Alas, I have had every good intention of getting to part 4--and the parts following, about Tibet--but first trimester pregnancy distractions (like throwing up and exhaustion) have sidetracked me beyond my wildest dreams. There will be a part 4, I promise, when precisely, I can't exactly say.
  13. I thought it might be interesting to discuss three themes that we've been discussing in the Shaw/Shapiro (aka “Shawpiro”) household lately: When cheaper is better When less is more When none is enough I'll start a separate discussion on each and edit in the links after they're up. (done) “When less is more” is a topic that has come up a lot lately when we've been out at restaurants. It seems that there is an unfortunate tendency, especially among “New American” chefs, to say “one ounce of cream is good, therefore ten ounces must be better!” But when you think that way, you get dishes that tast
  14. I thought it might be interesting to discuss three themes that we've been discussing in the Shaw/Shapiro (aka “Shawpiro”) household lately: When cheaper is better When less is more When none is enough I'll start a separate discussion on each and edit in the links after they're up. (done) “When cheaper is better” is something that came up recently when we went on a pancake kick courtesy of a friend who makes really good pancakes. The context in which it came up involves maple syrup. Steven, and I reveal this little known secret but you can't tell anyone, has family in the maple syrup business.
  15. The butter has now been Press'd'n Seal'd on that plate since last Saturday. We have used it almost every day at least once and sometimes twice or thrice. The original piece of Press'n Seal material is still in use and makes a good seal every time.
  16. My mother-in-law was just down in Texas visiting friends and came back with a report that EVERYBODY down there was using this stuff. She even went so far as to buy a box for me. I used it for the first time the other day, when I had a mound of Vermont Butter & Cheese Co. butter out on a little plate for brunch and had to put it away in the refrigerator. This was a stoneware plate with a rough texture. The Glad Press'n Seal (and by the way I would like to know what two words "Press'n" is a contraction of) pressed and sealed very, very well, so much so that it scared me a little.
  17. The question is do any of the fancy old hotels in town not do afternoon tea! Okay just kidding. But the challenge isn't finding it as much as the challenge is finding the places that do it well. There are also some service differences that, to me, are really important. If you're a real afternoon tea fanatic (can you tell I am?), you might also wish to keep track of which pastry chefs are moving around where. There's also the question of music, which is important to some though sometimes annoying, and the setting is important because tea is so much a see-and-be-seen activity. Food quality: I'm
  18. Yuki, I did not get to visit the five color lake. Do you remember where it was--close to the White Water Terraces (Baishuitai), what town it was near or what province it was in? I did visit Erhai Lake near Dali and Bita Lake near Zhongdian (Tibetan: Gyalthang).
  19. Reesek, the White Water Terraces are extremely shallow pools and they are cordoned off so that no one can walk on them (if you look very carefully at the photos, you should be able to see a couple of the stakes in the terraces that hold the wire boundary). As a result, they are inaccessible for walking on or in and animals do not water from them (that I ever saw, though I can’t vouch for what happens when the tourists aren’t there). They are, according to this source, the "result of a continuous piling up of calcite sediments resulting from the disintegration of calcium bicarbonate in the wate
  20. No obligation--I'm glad you enjoyed it enough to prompt you to make your first post! Welcome.
  21. reseek, aren't those way cool? Here are a few more photos, and I'll post some more info later.
  22. Ah, the trousers! They really aren't anything special, they just happen to be great all occasion pants and an extremely comfortable fit. Simple as that.
  23. The next installment (part 3) of this series is now online.
  24. << previous installment << I was delighted to have a free day with nothing scheduled. It was a lazy morning -- I did laundry, hung my clothes out to dry on the roof (where I encountered an older woman with a British accent who was getting high) and then hooked up with Bev for a leisurely day of exploration around old Dali. We covered not only the old cobblestone-paved city and its offshoot side streets, but also many streets and dirt paths outside of the city walls, often ending up at the entrance to someone’s yard, at a gate or a stable. We stumbled upon a lively market and, des
  25. Monica, you have the top 20 reasons to fall in love with India, I already love India and I’m countering with the top 5 reasons I enjoyed your post: 5. I loved your photos, they really illustrated what you were conveying with words (and by the way, knowing what kind of camera you have is overrated—so long as you know how to get good pictures, what does it matter?) 4. You whetted my appetite and now I want to know more--particularly about the details of your time spent in the kitchen with Chef Qureshi 3. Your cousin is beautiful—and I love the photo—what a field day I could have taking her pictu
×
×
  • Create New...