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Swisskaese

Hanukah/Chanukah/Hannukah

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Hanukah is next week (my week has already begun, Dec 7th) and I was wondering what everyone is planning.

I am going to a party at my Synagogue next Wednesday and we will go to some of our favourite bakeries for sufganiyot. We usually buy them at a bakery called Rolodin. There is always a line for about a half a block for the first couple of days. They have jam filled, dulce de leche, bavarian, vanilla creme, guanduja, etc. I will try and post some pictures.

I always make latkes. Last year I tried to be a little different and made a combination of sweet potato and regular potato latkes. I added carmelised onions and a pinch of nutmeg. They were quite good.

My Grandmother always made the most amazing apple pancakes and latkes for Hanukah. She would serve the latkes with bowls of sour cream, applesauce and apricot jam.

What are your family traditions and/or new twists?


Edited by snowangel (log)

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a marvelously informative thread from way back by Steven Shaw on this holiday :biggrin:

We make potato latkes and serve with sour cream if a dairy meal, but applesauce if a meat meal is being served .. gifts, candles, dreidels, and sufganiyot (doughnuts) from a local bakery .. much as you do! Thanks, Swisskaese!


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Our annual family Chanukah chaggigah (party) has been cancelled so I'm trying to decide what to do this year. I'm toying with inviting my brother and his family over for latkes one evening. And maybe having friends over on another night. I'm also trying to decide whether I'll attempt to make my own sufganiyot this year. I think the sufganiyot I ate in Israel are my madeline and store bought ones just don't capture the memories. Of course, I already know that Blovie will tell me not to bother.

In the meantime, the menorah needs to be polished. And I need to pick up a box of wicks. Plus, I'm waiting for Blovie's wish list because I haven't bought any gifts yet. :laugh:


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I think the sufganiyot I ate in Israel are my madeline and store bought ones just don't capture the memories.

Store bought ones in the States are definitely not the same as they are here. The closest ones are Krispy Kreme doughnuts, but I think they are too sweet.

I tried the Joan Nathan recipe and they are ok. Here is a Martha Stewart recipe that might come close:

Sufganiyot


Edited by Swisskaese (log)

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I think the sufganiyot I ate in Israel are my madeline and store bought ones just don't capture the memories.

Store bought ones in the States are definitely not the same as they are here. The closest ones are Krispy Kreme doughnuts, but I think they are too sweet.

The ones I dream about were purchased from the little stands that popped up on Ben-Yehudah for the 8 days of Chanukah. They were fried in front of your eyes and filled with your choice caramel or raspberry jam then rolled in powdered sugar. Eaten warm, they were outstanding.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Since returning to the States, I've become quite close with someone who will be observing Hanukah. I'd very much like to make her some of Michelle's (Martha's) Sufganiyot, do you think it will be an appropriate food gift to bring over? Are there any preparation restrictions that I should be aware of?


Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Since returning to the States, I've become quite close with someone who will be observing Hanukah. I'd very much like to make her some of Michelle's (Martha's) Sufganiyot, do you think it will be an appropriate food gift to bring over? Are there any preparation restrictions that I should be aware of?

Just find out if she allows food prepared in a non-kosher kitchen into her home. If she does, then I can't imagine there will be problems.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Since returning to the States, I've become quite close with someone who will be observing Hanukah.  I'd very much  like to make her some of Michelle's (Martha's)  Sufganiyot, do you think it will be an appropriate food gift to bring over?  Are there any preparation restrictions that I should be aware of?

Hi Yetty,

Please post your pictures if you make them. I am sure your friend will really appreciate them, but Bloviatrix is correct, you should ask if they keep Kosher.

Michelle

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I do not keep Kosher - so I make a brisket and a (not too sweet) noodle kugel. I've had these recipes for so many years I don't even know where I got them from - but they're good :smile: .

Don't have to polish the menorah (it's base metal - but I bought it in Israel - so it has special memories). Have to put up the outdoor lights - blue and white - and the Chanukah flag (we live in a big holiday lights/flags for every occasion neighborhood - I'm the only Jewish person on the block - and I like to advertise it :wink: ).

And we'll be flying to Arizona for a long weekend to visit my brother and his family. Should be a great holiday! Robyn

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I do the annual family Hanukkah party. I've already purchased the potatoes and onions to make the latkes as my late grandmother taught me (yes, she saw the benefit of the food processor). I hate frying in oil and only want to make and clean the mess once. So I make a huge batch and, as per Marlene Sorosky's book, freeze in a single layer and reheat in a single layer in a hot, hot oven. They are crisp and yummy and if I hadn't revealed this method to everyone, nobody would be the wiser.

Today I made my first batch of "Hanukkah cookies." Surprisingly like Christmas cookies but shaped like dreidels, 6-pointed stars and menorahs. This batch is in the freezer. Once all is done, they will be decorated with royal icing closer to the actual party.

I'll make a brisket and a turkey. My SIL is bringing the sides. I'll also make some more desserts.

At some point during the holiday, I will make Joan Nathan's sweet cheese latkes as a dessert. Yum.

Just picked up my "artsy" menorah from being repaired earlier this week and purchased candles. Still need to decide if we will go to the Temple Hanukkah party as well. My kids are getting a bit old for how they usually do it but maybe we'll give it another year.

Oh, yeah, still have to buy chocolate gelt to decorate with.


Edited by JFLinLA (log)

So long and thanks for all the fish.

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This is my first holiday season living with my husband, who's Catholic (we got married six months ago). Last year we celebrated together, but the menorah was at my place and a small tree at his. Now we'll have both--planning to put up the tree towards the end of Hanukkah, so passersby will see the combo. I hope I'm not offending anyone by saying how much I love having both--I was raised Kosher and conservative, and was always extremely covetous of Christmas decorations, so I'm thrilled to be able to mix and match. Thank God my family has welcomed my husband as one of their own (in fact one of my sisters-in-law told me that if I hadn't mentioned his religion, nobody ever would've realized he wasn't Jewish).

For just the two of us, we'll have a small Hanukkah celebration one night during the week with latkes and applesauce, and exchange small, jokey gifts each night; on Saturday we'll go to my family for the annual get-together, with brisket and more latkes and presents all around. I have two little nieces, so it's become much more child-oriented in the last few years, which is wonderful. And then on Christmas, we'll exchange bigger gifts, eat chinese food and go to the movies!


thoughts on food, writing, and everything else: Words to Eat By

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Have to put up the outdoor lights - blue and white - and the Chanukah flag (we live in a big holiday lights/flags for every occasion neighborhood - I'm the only Jewish person on the block - and I like to advertise it  :wink: ).

Actually, Robyn, you are doing precisely what one ought to do, namely, publicizing the miracle of the way in which the oil in the original menorah lasted eight full days ...this is why we light our menorah each night, with appropriate blessings, in the front bay windows of our home .. to celebrate the victory of good over evil that the Maccabee story tells... and sing the songs which commemorate this holiday .. one is my favorite by Peter, Paul, and Mary Light One Candle lyrics

Don’t let the light go out!

It’s lasted for so many years!

Don’t let the light go out!

Let it shine through our love and our tears.


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Is this the place to discuss the definitive Latke/Levivot/fasptshes/pontshkes recipe?

i559.jpg

I give mine in the eGCI Potato Primer, where I say

Note that there is no additional egg or flour. Some add these, but they are mistaken. I do not understand why people add the extra moisture in the egg, and then have to add flour or matzo meal to sop it up, which I think makes the texture insipid. For reference, the traditional version adds one or two beaten eggs, ¼ cup of flour or matzo meal, and a teaspoon of baking powder.

You can, but I don’t know why you would since the original version is so good, add sweet potato, cabbage, grated carrot, cheese or other vegetables to the mixture. I would not call these Latkes.

You can leave the peel on the potatoes if you need the fibre. You can bake the mixture on a silpat or non-stick paper, but they are not the same.

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Is this the place to discuss the definitive Latke/Levivot/fasptshes/pontshkes  recipe?

i559.jpg

I give mine in the  eGCI Potato Primer, where I say

Note that there is no additional egg or flour. Some add these, but they are mistaken. I do not understand why people add the extra moisture in the egg, and then have to add flour or matzo meal to sop it up, which I think makes the texture insipid. For reference, the traditional version adds one or two beaten eggs, ¼ cup of flour or matzo meal, and a teaspoon of baking powder.

You can, but I don’t know why you would since the original version is so good, add sweet potato, cabbage, grated carrot, cheese or other vegetables to the mixture. I would not call these Latkes.

You can leave the peel on the potatoes if you need the fibre. You can bake the mixture on a silpat or non-stick paper, but they are not the same.

With all due respect, you may be somewhat of an expert on potatoes, but I beg to differ.

I think it is unfair to say that someone's latke recipe is wrong because they use egg and flour or matza meal. It might be wrong for you, but some of us have been using recipes that have been passed down for hundred of years and my philosophy is don't mess with perfection.

As for adding additional ingredients, well so what?! I also think it is fun to experiment. There is a restaurant here in Tel Aviv that is famous for its sweet potato latkes. People line up for them throughout the year and not just at Hanukah. The most important thing about the Hanukah table is making sure that you have oily foods.

Latke is not a term that is just reserved for pure white potato pancakes. Show me in the Talmud where it says, "Thou shall only call a pancake made from white potatoes a latke."


Edited by Swisskaese (log)

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This is my first holiday season living with my husband, who's Catholic (we got married six months ago). Last year we celebrated together, but the menorah was at my place and a small tree at his. Now we'll have both

A decorating idea. Martha Stewart does a Christmas line for KMart that's all shades of blue + silver + white. Works fine for both holidays. Robyn

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Have to put up the outdoor lights - blue and white - and the Chanukah flag (we live in a big holiday lights/flags for every occasion neighborhood - I'm the only Jewish person on the block - and I like to advertise it  :wink: ).

Actually, Robyn, you are doing precisely what one ought to do, namely, publicizing the miracle of the way in which the oil in the original menorah lasted eight full days ...this is why we light our menorah each night, with appropriate blessings, in the front bay windows of our home .. to celebrate the victory of good over evil that the Maccabee story tells... and sing the songs which commemorate this holiday .. one is my favorite by Peter, Paul, and Mary...

When I first moved into this house (from a high rise condo) - I envied all the beautiful holiday light displays. And then I figured - Chanukah is the Festival of Lights - no reason I can't do a similar display that's Chanukah appropriate.

I light the regular menorah - but also put an electric one in the window (I'm afraid of burning the house down with candles in the window).

Will also add something else to the schedule - a first night Chanukah party/Menorah lighting here at the Jacksonville Beaches sponsored by Chabad. Now I am about as far away from Chabad in religious terms as is possible - but I thought it was so weird when Chabad set up shop here (because of the small Jewish population) that I have to give one of its parties a try (especially since it's serving fresh latkes and donuts - 2 things I won't make for our dinner for 2 at home). If anyone here is from the Jacksonville area - Chabad will also be doing "Chanukah at the Jacksonville Landing" downtown on December 12 right after the Jaguars game - complete with a "huge" menorah lighting (they show the menorah as 20 stories tall on the invitation - but I doubt it's that big :biggrin: ). Robyn

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If anyone here is from the Jacksonville area - Chabad will also be doing "Chanukah at the Jacksonville Landing" downtown on December 12 right after the Jaguars game - complete with a "huge" menorah lighting (they show the menorah as 20 stories tall on the invitation - but I doubt it's that big  :biggrin: ).  Robyn

Chabad is known for their "oversized" menorahs. They light a massive one every year in Grand Army Plaza (in front on The Plaza Hotel) in Manhattan, and they also have a huge one they light in Red Square, Moscow. They need to use a cherry picker to light them.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Show me in the Talmud where it says, "Thou shall only call a pancake made from white potatoes a latke."

I think its an extension of the doctrine of shatnes. :smile:


Edited by jackal10 (log)

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As a Catholic who married an atheist :blink: and is now living in Israel..... It's fascinating to watch the country welcome Hannukah..... The sufganiyot are really alluring.......tho' my teacher in the ulpan said, "Ladies! Beware!" and then drew a sufganiyah on the board. "Those have 400 calories each!"

I think I'll have to go taste and see if that's really true..... :biggrin:

Best wishes for the holidays......

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Show me in the Talmud where it says, "Thou shall only call a pancake made from white potatoes a latke."

I think its an extension of the doctrine of shatnes. :smile:

Shaatnez is about mixing wool and linen, which are fabrics from the animal and plant world. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, cabbage, etc. are all vegetables. :smile:

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As a Catholic who married an atheist :blink: and is now living in Israel..... It's fascinating to watch the country welcome Hannukah..... The sufganiyot are really alluring.......tho' my teacher in the ulpan said, "Ladies! Beware!" and then drew a sufganiyah on the board. "Those have 400 calories each!"

I think I'll have to go taste and see if that's really true..... :biggrin:

Best wishes for the holidays......

Hi Rehovot,

Make sure you get your 400 calories worth. Go to Rolodin bakery.

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jackal10 -- those latkes look delicious. I'm glad you reminded us of your "tractate" on potatoes, because I remember reading it "back then," and at the part about latkes and eggs, etc. I thought I'd like to try it that way next Hannukah. And here it is, next Hannukah already! (But I am still going to try the beet latkes and carrot latkes from Bon Apetit. I don't remember if they have eggs in them, but they probably do.) Mmmmm. Fried potatoes. What could be bad?

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Last night I went through Gil Mark's World of Jewish Baking. He features all sorts of traditional deep-fried pastries for Chanukah as well as sufganiyot. I want to make one of everything.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I found a recipe for Pumpkin Fritters that looks very interesting.

Pumpkin Fritters

Can you tell that I didn't get to celebrate Thanksgiving. :rolleyes:


Edited by Swisskaese (log)

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Show me in the Talmud where it says, "Thou shall only call a pancake made from white potatoes a latke."

I think its an extension of the doctrine of shatnes. :smile:

Shaatnez is about mixing wool and linen, which are fabrics from the animal and plant world. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, cabbage, etc. are all vegetables. :smile:

Actually, I happen to like potato latkes with a small amount of matzo meal in them. I think the matzo meal sucks up some of the "gooeyness" and adds some needed texture to the latke. This is particularly necessary I think with the large "deli" style latkes like they serve at places like the Carnegie, The Stage, Sarge's and Katz's in NYC, where matzo meal IS used, and they have a more cakey texture, similar to a potato kugel.

Definitely a different animal of latke though, although I like them both. I like all latkes, really.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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