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LaMiaCucina

Actual % of Humidity

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Wouldn't you know it!  We have a family wedding in a couple of weeks, and I've had a misfortune in the basement adding some extra humidity to the air.  It won't be fixed before next weekend, which is when I need to have everything finished.  Adding to the problem is a lot of rain.  

 

I made a batch of pizzelle, and within hours, they were soft.  Since I don't want to have to redo again, does anyone know what the optimal percent of humidity should be in the air when baking cookies that need to stay crispy?   I'm looking for an actual number, such as 40%, 30%, etc.  If I need to get another dehumidifier, I will.

 

Thanks in advance!

AG

 

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