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Mallet

Coco

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I just stumbled upon Coco at Chapters yesterday and couldn't resist picking it up.

The premise is that 10 of the world's most famous chefs (Ferran Adrià, Alain Ducasse, Alice Waters, René Redzepi, Jacky Yu, Yoshihiro Murata, Fergus Henderson, Shannon Bennett, Mario Batali, and Gordon Ramsay) each select 10 chefs who they think are making important contributions to modern gastronomy. For each of the resulting 100 chefs, there is a short blurb by the "Master" who chose them about what aspect of their cooking is exciting, a brief bio, pictures, and a sample menu + recipes.

The final result is a really cool snapshot of what is going on in some of the most exciting restaurants in the world today.

Has anybody else seen/bought this book? Have you cooked from it yet?

Here's an eGullet friendly link Coco


Martin Mallet

<i>Poor but not starving student</i>

www.malletoyster.com

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I bought this book when it came out; mainly as a friend of mine is in it on the recommendation of Fergus Henderson.

I really like it; as with most of Phaidon's recent books, the presentation style is stunning. It gives a good insight into what some of the up and coming chefs across the world are doing. It is particularly interesting to see the different likes and styles of the nominating chefs.

The recipes are a tad brief on the whole. They are restaurant-standard dishes, summarised in about an inch for each one. But the book is lovely and I'm a big fan of it.

Adam

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