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Boker's Bitters


evo-lution
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I'm glad to anounce that I am the first happy owner of the Boker's Bitters in South America, more precisely in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and it can be found on the Copacabana Palace Hotel bar. Some pics to come!! :wub:

Keep up the excelent work Adam

Paulo Freitas

Bartender @ Bar do Copa (Copacabana Palace, Rio de Janeiro - Brazil)

http://www.bardocopa.com.br

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I'm glad to anounce that I am the first happy owner of the Boker's Bitters in South America, more precisely in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and it can be found on the Copacabana Palace Hotel bar. Some pics to come!! :wub:

Great news! Let us know your thoughts and if you come up with any recipes then please share them with us.

Keep up the excelent work Adam

I'll do my best. :smile:

Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

I recently won the Drambuie UK Cocktail Competition and the following drink was my twist on a Rusty Nail which we had to create for the comp (alongside an original Drambuie cocktail);

B.F.G

40ml Drambuie

25ml Noilly Prat Rouge

10ml Laphroaig 10 year old

2 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Boker's Bitters

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass, fill with cubed ice and stir for 15-20 seconds.

Glass: Two small cocktail glasses

Garnish: Fresh lemon zest

Ice: N/A

The B.F.G called upon the cardamom within Drambuie which was enhanced using my recreated Boker's Bitters, also offering orange peel, dark chocolate, and bitter coffee. Noilly Rouge was used for its fruitiness, spiciness and herbal notes whilst the whisky I chose to use had to be packed full of flavour to stand up to all of this so I could look no further than Laphroaig 10 year old for its hints of salt, seaweed, iodine, peat and citrus. The drink was finished with lemon zest which gave a fresh lift to the drink that I served between two in miniature cocktail glasses. A relatively simple drink which stays true to the Rusty Nail we recognise today whilst also paying homage to its predecessor the B.I.F, the classic Rob Roy, as well as the the Cock-tail which dates back to the 1700s at around the same time when the Drambuie story began...

For those that are interested, my original drink was as follows;

Fosbury Flip

1 Barspoon Caraway seeds

50ml Drambuie

25ml Bacardi 8 year old

1 whole egg, preferably free range.

2 Dashes Bittermens Xocolatl Mole Bitters

5ml Sugar syrup

Grind Hawaiian red lava salt

Grind black pepper

Method: Muddle caraway seeds in base of mixing glass, add liquor and steep for 2 minutes. Add all other ingredients and dry shake for 5 seconds. Fill with ice and shake for a further 10 seconds. Fine strain.

Glass: Goblet

Garnish: Fresh grated nutmeg

Ice: None

The Fosbury Flip added the fantastic flavours of anise, nut and orange peel found within caraway seeds which complimented Drambuie. To this I added Bacardi 8 which brings toffee, roasted nut, vanilla, citrus zest and dried apricot. To lengthen the finish I chose to use Bittermen's Xocolatl Mole Bitters for its notes of bitter chocolate and cinnamon. On top of that I added a grind of both black pepper and Hawaiian red lava salt which offers more spice, citrus and also a sweet mineral flavour. A dash of sugar syrup and a whole egg smoothed out all these flavours, before finishing with a dusting of fresh grated nutmeg which opened up the nose before the layers of flavour which were to follow.

Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

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  • 3 months later...
dandelionburdock.jpg

Thought I'd share some drinks recipes that contain my new Dandelion & Burdock Bitters as I know some users here have got their hands on them;

Usuki Old Fashioned

usukidbcropped.jpg

Created by Adam Elmegirab for Yatai spring cocktail menu – March 2010

50ml Genever

12.5ml Sugar syrup

4 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab’s Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass fill with cubed ice and stir for fifteen-twenty seconds. Julep strain

Glass: Rocks/Old Fashioned

Garnish: Lemon zest

Ice: Cubed

Chiapas Old Fashioned

Created by Adam Elmegirab for Yatai winter cocktail menu – November 2009

50ml Patron Silver tequila

12.5ml Green tea infused sugar syrup

2 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab’s Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

1 Dash Regan’s Orange Bitters #6

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass fill with cubed ice and stir for fifteen-twenty seconds. Julep strain

Glass: Rocks / Old Fashioned

Garnish: Grapefruit zest

Ice: Large double frozen ice cube

Lion’s Tooth

Created for Dr. Adam Elmegirab’s Dandelion & Burdock Bitters – April 2010

50ml Herradura Reposado

12.5ml Licor 43

25ml Fresh squeezed lemon juice

1 Fresh egg white

4 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab’s Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

1 Heaped barspoon caster sugar

Method: Dissolve sugar in lemon juice; add all remaining ingredients and dry shake for 5 seconds. Fill with cubed ice then shake hard for a further 10 seconds and fine strain.

Glass: Rocks/Old Fashioned

Garnish: Star anise

Ice: Cubed

The Grove

Created for Dr. Adam Elmegirab’s Dandelion & Burdock Bitters – May 2010

50ml Zubrowka

10ml Licor 43

37.5ml Fresh pressed apple juice

12.5ml Fresh squeezed lemon juice

4 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab’s Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

12.5ml Sugar Syrup (2-1)

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass fill with cubed ice and shake hard for ten seconds. Fine strain

Glass: Chilled coupette or cocktail

Garnish: N/A

Ice: N/A

Highland Picnic

Created for Caorunn Gin by Brand Ambassador Ervin Trykowski

25ml Caorunn Gin

25ml Lillet Rouge,

12.5ml Freshly squeezed lemon juice

25ml Fresh pressed apple juice

3 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

Top with lemonade

Method: Build over cubed ice and stir

Glass: Collins/Highball

Garnish: Apple slices, seasonal berries and other various fresh fruit and herbs

Ice: Cubed

Dandelion Martinez

Variant on the classic Martinez by Caorunn Gin Brand Ambassador Ervin Trykowski - May 2009

40ml Caorunn Gin

20ml Antica Formula

3 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

2 Dashes Luxardo Maraschino

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass fill with cubed ice and stir for fifteen-twenty seconds. Julep strain

Glass: Chilled cocktail

Garnish: Orange zest

Ice: N/A

Cachaca Martinez

Variant on the classic Martinez by Adam Elmegirab - May 2009

60ml Sagatiba Velha

15ml Noilly Dry

15ml Noilly Rouge

4 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

2 Dashes Luxardo Maraschino

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass fill with cubed ice and stir for fifteen-twenty seconds. Julep strain

Glass: Chilled cocktail

Garnish: Lemon zest

Ice: N/A

Edited by evo-lution (log)

Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

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I wouldn't think you were old enough to have played Doom, Adam.

;-)

I didn't even know what you were talking about until I googled it. :/

I'm 28 by the way!

Edited by evo-lution (log)

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Jefferson's Green

Created by Mike Sharples for Harvey Nichol's in Edinburgh.

5 Large mint leaves

50ml Jeffersons Bourbon

25ml Green tea

5ml Sugar syrup

10ml Green Chartreuse

4 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass, fill with cubed ice and shake hard

for 10 seconds. Fine strain.

Glass: Chilled cocktail

Garnish: N/A

Ice: N/A

Rowan's Blush

Created by Mike Sharples for Harvey Nichol's in Edinburgh

40ml Caorunn Gin

20ml Fresh pressed apple juice

20ml Chamomile Tea

20ml Freshly squeezed lemon juice

10ml Sugar syrup

2 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Dandelion & Burdock bitters

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass, fill with cubed ice and shake hard for 10 seconds.

Glass: Chilled cocktail

Garnish: N/A

Ice: N/A

Adam's Apple

Created by Ben Iravani at Orchid Aberdeen

50ml Elements 8 Platinum

12.5ml Monin Apple

4 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass, fill with cubed ice and stir for 15-20 seconds. Julep strain.

Glass: Rocks/Old Fashioned

Garnish: Lemon zest

Ice: Cubed

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  • 4 weeks later...

I recently wrote an article* for MUDL (www.mudlmag.com) in South Africa which was essentially an overview and insight into the history of bitters.

This also forms part of a larger document that I am working on at the moment and is the basis for the bitters training program I intend on rolling out in the UK in the coming weeks, which will then be followed in various countries around the World.

A Bitter Sweet Symphony

“Sir, I observe in your paper of the 6th instant, in the account of a democratic candidate for a seat in the legislature, marked under the head of Loss, 25 do. Cock-tail. Will you be so obliging as to inform me what is meant by this species of refreshment? Though a stranger to you, I believe, from your general character, you will not suppose this request to be impertinent.”

“I shall not hesitate to gratify the curiosity of my inquisitive correspondent: Cock-tail, then is a stimulating liquor, composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water and bitters it is vulgarly called a bittered sling, and is supposed to be an excellent electioneering potion inasmuch as it renders the heart stout and bold, at the same time that it fuddles the head. It is said also, to be of great use to a democratic candidate: because, a person having swallowed a glass of it, is ready to swallow anything else.”

First printed on Tuesday 13th May 1806 in New York’s Balance & Columbian Repository this exchange details the definition of the Cock-tail. Whilst there is no definitive literature that explains the origins of the term, this repartee clarifies exactly what was to be expected of a beverage of its type.

Nowadays it is the norm to classify all mixed drinks with three or more ingredients as a Cock-tail; however the Cock-tail was classically a morning drink, a pick-me-up or an eye-opener if you must. At a time when drinks families had clear definitions, the one detail that separated the Cock-tail from other families was the crucial inclusion of bitters.

So what are bitters I hear you ask? Put simply, they are a compound of herbs, roots, barks, spices and spirit which were originally used as a medicine. The final product should have layers and layers of flavour with a pronounced bitter, or bittersweet, flavour.

It is worth noting that there are two common types of bitter, potable and non-potable, and it is advisable to understand the differences. Potable bitters, the likes of Campari, Fernet Branca and Jägermeister which can be consumed on their own, typically act as digestifs. Non-potable bitters such as Angostura Aromatic, Peychaud’s Aromatic, Dr. Adam Elmegirab’s Boker’s or Regan’s Orange #6 are not intended to be imbibed on their own, but instead are typically dashed into drinks to act as a flavouring agent and binder. Our interest for the moment is in this non-potable variety.

Historically bitters were lauded for their ability to cure a vast number of ailments with many bitters producers making absurd claims that their product could cure a variety of illnesses. With that said, what is undeniable is their ability to aid digestion. When bitter flavours come into contact with the human tongue it stimulates a sequence of events that culminates in the flow of digestive juices to the stomach, liver, duodenum and pancreas. Many doctors believe it is the lack of bitter flavours in the diet of some United States citizens that is a contributory factor to digestive related health issues prevalent in the US. When you compare their digestive problems to the lack of such in Germany and Italy who are regular imbibers of bitter drinks such as Underberg and Campari, it appears that they may indeed have a valid point.

Although bitters were traditionally consumed for their medicinal properties, they later found their way into food and primarily drink as a flavouring agent and digestive stimulant. Due to the many layers of flavour they contain bitters assist in the integration of flavours found within cocktails, bridging gaps between the various components and adding layers of complexity, depth and character. Think of food without seasoning and you are on the way to understanding why bitters play an essential role in many mixed drinks. Some refer to bitters as the salt & pepper of cocktails, and although I don’t feel that entirely does them justice I fully understand where they are coming from with the analogy.

Bitters were a mainstay of mixology throughout the 1700s and early 1800s in spirituous drinks such as the Cock-tail. At their peak during the 17-1800s there were literally hundreds of bitters on the market such as Hostetter’s, Stoughton, Caroni, Celery, Pepsin and Schroeder, et al. In the mid-1800s, sometime after 1840 and likely the early 1850s, the Cock-tail as it was known would experience something of an Evo-lution [shameless plug]. Joseph Santini, the recently appointed manager of the New Orleans City Exchange, took the classic Cock-tail and added lemon juice, ice in place of water, Curacao and a sugar-crusted rim, thus giving birth to the Crusta. The Cock-tail would never be the same again.

In the late 1800s, with vermouth and maraschino added to a bartender’s armoury, the likes of the Martinez, Improved Cocktail, Martini and Manhattan were born. Perhaps the greatest example of the Cock-tail’s development was witnessed in 1887 when the Morning Glory Cocktail first went to print in Jerry Thomas’ rewritten bartender’s guide. The name alone spells out this drink’s intentions to act as a corpse reviver of sorts. Take the classic Cock-tail of spirit, sugar, water and bitters, in this case brandy, whiskey, gum syrup, ice and Boker’s. Add to that some dashes of Curacao and Absinthe, two more favourites of bartenders in the late 1800s, a twist of lemon peel and stir with ice. Strain into a small highball to remove the ice, top with soda water and finish with a teaspoon of powdered sugar which will add some froth and fizz to the drink. And there you have a hangover cure as prescribed by Professor Jerry Thomas.

These relatively simple changes to the Cock-tail gave us some of the greatest drinks ever created, with bitters at the heart of all these libations. Sadly, this was arguably the pinnacle of bitters’ influence on mixology as it was about to enter a period which would signal the death-knell for many US-based bitters companies.

As we moved into the early 1900s the palates of bar patrons were ever-evolving with an increasing demand for lighter drinks that were predominantly citrus led. Bitters were not the only product to suffer during this time, with Old Tom gin and Dutch Genever losing favour to London Dry gin, and dark, funky rums falling behind light rums. Couple this with the passing of the Pure Food & Drug Act of 1906, which stipulated that patent medicines (the distinct classification that many bitters fell under due to their questionable medicinal properties) could no longer be sold with misleading labels or as a product which had no substance to their alleged claims, and the writing was on the wall: even more so when you consider what was about to happen in the succeeding years.

Those companies that were fortunate to survive these troubled times were dealt the final nail in their coffin with the passing of the Volstead Act in 1919, which we now commonly refer to as Prohibition. This act prohibited the sale, manufacture, transportation, import and export of alcohol and alcoholic beverages and was in effect in the United States of America between 1920 and 1933. The lasting effects of Prohibition, the details of which are too lengthy to go into just now, were to be felt for decades, not just in the US but across the World with Cock-tail culture falling by the wayside until recent years.

Thankfully two bitters producers survived this traumatic period, Peychaud’s Aromatic from New Orleans and undoubtedly the most famous bitters of them all, Angostura Aromatic, originally of Venezuela but nowadays based in Trinidad. It is the survival of these bottlings that has ensured the importance of Cock-tail bitters has never been forgotten, leading to the bitters renaissance we are currently experiencing.

Across the globe bars and bartenders are experiencing something akin to a second coming of the Cock-tail, with many revisiting and rediscovering the lost arts of the 17-1800s, combining them with new-found methodologies, techniques and a deeper understanding of the history of the Cock-tail. Whereas before we would pick up vintage cocktail books and only dream of Tom Bullock’s Celery Sour with Celery Bitters, or Jerry Thomas’ Japanese Cocktail with Boker’s Bitters, or a Martini with Orange Bitters, we can now reproduce these classics and sample a little bit of history for ourselves.

During the first Golden Age of the Cock-tail in the 1800s, bartenders had access to a variety of bitters with which they created a number of timeless libations such as the Martinez, Crusta, Manhattan, Sazerac, and Japanese Cocktail, to name but a few. The good work of a certain Dr. Adam Elmegirab and companies such as The Bitter Truth, Regan’s, Scrappy’s, Bob’s, Bittermen’s and Fee Brothers, who have all reformulated bitters that were lost to the sands of time or have themselves created new bottlings, has meant the baton has now been passed from our forefathers to the bartenders of today so they can create their own classics in this new Golden Age of Cock-tails…

Sláinte!

*Downloadable here - http://www.scribd.com/doc/33785314/Dr-Adam-Elmegirab-s-Article-1-A-Bitter-Sweet-Symphony

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  • 4 months later...

Been digging out some vintage Boker's recipes so thought I'd share them here;

Royal Cocktail (La Cuisine Creole, Lafcadio Hearn, 1885)

One lump sugar; two dashes of Boker’s Bitters; two tablespoonfuls of Belfast ginger ale; one wineglass of whiskey, or brandy; one lemon peel; plenty of ice. Shake well, and strain in fancy glass.

Criterion Cocktail (American & Other Drinks, Leo Engel, 1878)

To make a splendid bottle of Criterion Cocktail use the following ingredients:- Three-eighths of a bottle of brandy; half a pint of water; one liqueur glass of Boker’s Bitters; one wine glass of plain syrup; half a liqueur glass of Benedictine. The author has always used this recipe in compounding the above beverage for connoisseurs. Whiskey and gin cocktails in bottles may be made by using the above recipe, substituting those liquors in place of brandy.

Our Swizzle (American & Other Drinks, Leo Engel, 1878)

It occurred to the author of this little work, after a conversation with an Indian gentleman, to make a cocktail called in India a Swizzle. Take a small tumbler, half fill it with chipped ice; then add one and a half liqueur glasses of Boker’s Bitters; half a wine glass of brandy; and two or three drops of Noyeau to flavour and sweeten it. Now swizzle this concoction, with an Indian cane swizzle, to a froth; drink through a strainer. Tastes differ. An Indian likes a cocktail swizzled; a North American, within the last few years, will not take one unless it is stirred with a spoon; a South American will take it shaken; an Englishman, who has travelled in America, is more particular than any of the others until you find out his taste, and is most difficult to please.

Sherry Blush (American & Other Drinks, Leo Engel, 1878)

To a half glass of sherry add a tea-spoonful of Boker’s Bitters; the juice of half a lemon; a tea-spoonful of raspberry Noyeau and Vanilla, mix well with shaved ice, and strain in an ornamented glass – a white glass is preferable, which, if dipped in coloured sugar, will make a pretty appearance. This is a very tasty little drink, and suitable after luncheon.

Star Cocktail (The Banquet Book, Cuyler Reynolds, 1902)

This sparkling drink is composed of three dashes of Boker’s Bitters, half a jigger of apple brandy, half a jigger of Italian vermouth, and a piece of lemon peel.

Vermouth Cocktail (The Banquet Book, Cuyler Reynolds, 1902)

This cocktail is liked by not a few and generally secures constant advocates. It is concocted from a dash or two of Boker’s Bitters, one jigger of French or Italian vermouth, which is the base, and a piece of lemon peel.

Persian Rose Leaf Punch (The Cook Book, Jane Rush, 1918)

14 Cubes sugar

1 Champagne glass Brandy

1 Claret glass Orange Curacao

1/4 Teaspoon Boker's Bitters

1 Quart Champagne

Let sugar, brandy and Curacao stand overnight (until the sugar is thoroughly melted to syrup), then add the bitters. When ready to serve, put into put into punch bowl with a block of hard ice and one quart of Champagne, spreading a few rose leaves on the ice, if you have them. If too strong, add one bottle Clysmic Water. To increase amount, double proportions as often as necessary.

Edited by evo-lution (log)

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Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

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  • 1 month later...

Is anyone finding the Scrappy's celery bitters to be overwhelming? I just got a bottle of Death's Door gin and tried to make a 2:1 Martini with the bitters, old style NP vermouth, and a lemon twist. Egad: it was overpoweringly celery... ish.

Now I'm enjoying that same 2:1 DD/NP/lemon Martini, but with a dash of half Regan's, half Fee's orange bitters. Lovely.

Chris Amirault

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Another Boker's Bitters recipe for you by Christos Kyriakidis from the Vanilla Rooms in Cardiff, created for Diageo's 'World Class' competition...

http://www.worldclassuk.com/ViewCocktail.aspx?c=2807

Above the Rest

Above%20the%20Rest.jpg

1 Earl Grey tea-bag

37.5ml Zacapa 23

15ml Prune liqueur

2 Dashes Boker's Bitters

2.5ml Cigar infused demerara sugar syrup

Method: Soak tea bag in rum for one minute, remove, then squeeze lemon twist inside mixing glass. Add all ingredients and stir with cubed ice for 15-20 seconds. Strain into chilled glass.

Glass: Flute

Garnish: Spiked cherry

Ice: N/A

Note: For the cigar infused syrup add cigar and powdered sugar to airtight container and leave for two weeks, then use this infused sugar to make a syrup

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've uploaded a couple of documents to Scribd that you may be interested in.

The first is my bitters product portfolio which details all relevant info behind my bitters with regards the key ingredients, production process, tasting notes (and a blank area for tasting notes to write your own), recommended recipe, and so on.

Product Portfolio - http://www.scribd.com/doc/35534031/Dr-Adam-Elmegirab-s-Bitters-Product-Portfolio

The second document is detailed info regarding the key botanicals in my bitters;

The growth of the internet has coincided with an increased want for information from both bartenders and consumers alike. With the release of my Bitters Product Portfolio at the tail-end of 2010, which detailed the production process of my bitters as well as tasting notes, I have had numerous requests for more information on the botanicals I use to compound my bottlings.

Having thought long and hard about ways in which I could improve the product knowledge of my bitters I decided it would be a good idea to compile detailed information on all the botanicals I use so you can understand a little more about ingredients you will have heard of but may never come into contact with, have a better grasp of where the flavour profile comes from, and also gain a deeper knowledge of each botanical’s historical and medicinal relevance.

This goes against the philosophy of many bitters producers who wish to remain as secretive as possible, which in my opinion detracts from the full potential of bitters and their vast array of uses in both the culinary and cocktail crafts. By releasing this information I feel that bartenders and consumers will be better equipped to use my bottlings to their full potential…

Botanical Information - http://www.scribd.com/doc/46837267/Dr-Adam-Elmegirab-s-Botanical-Information

Would appreciate your thoughts on what I regard is a very useful training/educational tool.

Edited by evo-lution (log)

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Is anyone finding the Scrappy's celery bitters to be overwhelming? I just got a bottle of Death's Door gin and tried to make a 2:1 Martini with the bitters, old style NP vermouth, and a lemon twist. Egad: it was overpoweringly celery... ish.

Yea, you have to go short with it -- especially compared to the BT celery bitters, which I find a bit lacking in celery flavor and overall oomph (although still a quality product). As a general rule of thumb for Scrappy's, I use 1 drop = 1 dash.

--

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Very generous and interesting, Adam. I was surprised to see that all three involve only maceration, particularly given the depth of them. Why only that?

The main reason is that I want to stay true to techniques that were employed in the original hey-day of bitters production, using only natural botanicals and high-strength spirit. On top of that I want my bitters to be truly hand-crafted and for me to be involved in every element of production where possible.

I will explore other production techniques (such as distillation) and intend to experiment later this year but Boker's, Dandelion & Burdock and Spanish will always be made by way of cold-compounding/maceration. If I ever release a product that has been distilled then I will make sure that everyone knows.

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Yea, you have to go short with it -- especially compared to the BT celery bitters, which I find a bit lacking in celery flavor and overall oomph (although still a quality product). As a general rule of thumb for Scrappy's, I use 1 drop = 1 dash.

When you say 'celery flavour' what exactly do you mean as I've seen you post this before? The TBT celery bitters tastes very much like Celery seed to me, and Celery seed is very different to Celery stalks.

I have been working on a blogpost for quite some time which is going to cover the expectations of flavoured bitters, what they originally were and what you should expect. From what I've found with regards vintage bitters, the name of the bitters doesn't necessarily correlate to the actual taste of the end product but instead to its medicinal value. So for example Peach Bitters shouldn't and didn't necessarily taste of 'Peach'.

Edited by evo-lution (log)

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  • 1 month later...

My Limited Edition Spanish Bitters are now released and are popping up around the globe;

spanishhiressam.jpg

You can pick them up at Cocktail Kingdom, The Meadow in Portland and New York, Dranken Unie (Netherlands), DeLaurenti's (Seattle), Haromex (Germany, Austria, Switzerland), LMDW (France), S&B Gastro Team (Czech Republic), Speciality Drinks (London), Rossi & Rossi (Italy), Sprit & Co. (Denmark) and more TBC in the coming days.

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Spanish Bitters evoke memories of a style of bitters dating back to the early years of the cock-tail. Based on Spanish Bitters recipes from the 1800s, these bitters have been reformulated to work in harmony with modern spirits and libations and are now in demand across the globe.

Tasting Notes: Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Spanish Bitters have layers of complex flavour including coriander, violet, raspberry, honey, citrus, pomegranate, toasted orange and predominant chamomile all leading to a long bittersweet finish.

Union Flip

1 Barspoon Caraway Seeds

4 Crunches Black Peppercorn

1 Whole egg

37.5ml Appleton 8 Year Old

37.5ml Licor 43

4 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Spanish Bitters

5ml Sugar Syrup

Method – Muddle caraway seeds in base of mixing glass add remaining ingredients and dry shake for five seconds. Fill with cubed ice and shake hard for a further ten seconds. Fine strain

Glass – Small frozen wine glass

Garnish – Grated nutmeg

Ice – N/A

Turza

50ml Don Julio Reposado

25ml Fresh lemon juice

3 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Spanish Bitters

12.5ml Orgeat syrup

5ml Sugar syrup

Method - Add all ingredients to mixing glass fill with cubed ice and shake hard for ten seconds. Fine strain

Glass - Chilled coupette

Garnish - Orange zest

Ice - N/A

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Been enjoying this drink the last couple of days;

Mariachi

Created by Adam Elmegirab, 8th March 2011

40ml Tapatio Reposado

12.5ml Campari

10ml Agave Sec

25ml Fresh lime juice

4 Dashes Limited Edition Spanish Bitters

Dash sugar syrup.

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass fill with cubed ice and shake hard for 10 seconds

Glass: Frozen cocktail

Garnish: Grapefruit zest

Ice: N/A

Suppose you could reference it as a variant on Paul Harrington's Jasmine cocktail...

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I'm getting a Cocktail Kingdom bitters order together that's going to include your Boker's and Spanish bitters as well as a couple others. Keeping my fingers crossed that Canadian customs is going to let it all through.

Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I do believe that my two favorite bitters these days are the Bittermens xocolatl and Adam's Bokers.

You have good taste Chris. :wink:

Been working on a recipe the last couple of days and finally nailed it;

Aristotle

40ml Geranium gin

10ml Bols Apricot Brandy

5ml Martini Extra Dry

3 Dashes Limited Edition Spanish Bitters

25ml Fresh lime juice

Barspoon caster sugar

Method: Add sugar and lime juice to mixing glass and stir until dissolved, add remaining ingredients fill with cubed ice and shake hard for 10 seconds

Glass: Frozen coupette

Garnish: Long thin strip of lime zest twisted and dropped in drink

Ice: N/A

Notes: Based around the subtle floral notes in Geranium Premium London Dry Gin, Apricot Brandy, dry vermouth and Spanish Bitters

Highly recommended!

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Eager to hear about your reaction to the Spanish bitters. I do believe that my two favorite bitters these days are the Bittermens xocolatl and Adam's Bokers.

I have the Boker's and Spanish on order so we'll see how it goes. I have Peychaud's and Regan's on the order as well because I can't find a Canadian source for either. I can get Bittermen's, Angostura (regular and orange) and Fee's here. I'm also going to check out a Canadian-made orange bitters, Twisted & Bitter from Victoria Spirits, and I'm waiting for some information on another line of Canadian-made bitters from House Made. I want to find out if the House Made are spirit based with bittering agents in addition to the flavoring agents or if they're more in the style of Fee's.

Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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  • 1 month later...

Wanted to share a bunch of new recipes (using Boker's, Dandelion & Burdock and Limited Edition Spanish) from all around the globe;

Boker's Bitters

Kennedy Manhattan

Created at the Oak Room in Copenhagen;

50ml El Dorado 15

20ml Dolin Blanc

4 Dashes Boker's Bitters

1 Barspoon maple syrup

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass and stir until maple syrup has dissolved, fill with cubed ice and stir for a further 15-20 seconds

Glass: Vintage cocktail

Garnish: Cherry

Ice: N/A

London's Burning

Created by Craig Toone, March 2011;

40ml London Dry Gin

10ml Noilly Pratt

3 Dashes of Boker's Bitters

Rinse Laphroaig 10 year old

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass fill with cubed ice and stir for 15-20 seconds

Glass: Chilled vintage cocktail

Garnish: Two flamed orange zests

Ice: N/A

Truth Serum

Created by Ian Goodman of Oxo Tower in London, November 2010;

25ml Bitter Truth Elixier

25ml Carpano Antica Formula

20ml Benedictine

3 Dashes Boker's Bitters

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass, fill with cubed ice and stir for 15-20 seconds.

Glass: Vintage cocktail

Garnish: Fat strip of lemon zest

Ice: N/A

Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

The Modern Day Cocktail

Created by Jamie Mac (Raconteur) winning him a trip to Jalisco as well as securing his place in the UK final of World Class UK (March 2011);

45ml Tanqueray Gin

12ml Margaret River Chardonnay

10ml Sugar syrup

2 Dashes Dandelion & Burdock bitters

3 Fresh lime peels

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass, fill with cubed ice and stir for 15-20 seconds

Glass: Chilled vintage coupe

Garnish: N/A

Ice: N/A

Best of British

Created by Sam Kershaw for Hyde & Co. in Bristol, March 2011;

50ml Tanqueray 10

20ml Kingston Black Apple Aperitif

5ml juice of Morello Cherries soaked in Apple Eaux de Vie

3 dashes Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass, fill with cubed ice and stir for 15-20 seconds

Glass: Chilled vintage coupe

Garnish: Cherry

Ice: N/A

Spruce Goose

Created at Dutch Kills Bar in New York;

60ml London Dry gin

30ml Cocchi Americano

7.5ml Apricot Brandy

2 Dashes Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass and stir with cubed ice for 15-20 seconds

Glass: Chilled coupette

Garnish: Fat strip of lemon zest

Ice: N/A

Chamomile Old Fashioned

Created at Riva in Freiburg, Germany

60ml Tanqueray Gin

20ml chamomile tea (cold!)

15ml sugar syrup

4 Dashes Dr.Adam Elmegirab's Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass fill with cubed ice and stir for fifteen-twenty seconds.

Glass Type: Old Fashioned

Garnish: Lemon Zest

Ice: Rocks

Limited Edition Spanish Bitters

Mariachi

Created by Adam Elmegirab, 8th March 2011

40ml Tapatio Reposado

12.5ml Campari

10ml Agave Sec

25ml Fresh lime juice

4 Dashes Limited Edition Spanish Bitters

Dash sugar syrup.

Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass fill with cubed ice and shake hard for 10 seconds

Glass: Frozen cocktail

Garnish: Grapefruit zest

Ice: N/A

Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

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