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rubing_1.jpg

rubing_2.jpgRubing is a firm, fresh goat milk cheese made in the Yunnan Province of China by people of the Bai and Sani (recognized as a branch of the Yi in China) minorities.

Its Bai name is youdbap, meaning "goat's milk".

It is made by mixing heated goat's milk and a souring agent, traditionally a mixture called naiteng made from a cultivated vine.

It is often served pan fried, and dipped in salt, sugar . It may also be stir fried with vegetables in place of tofu.

Much like paneer or queso blanco, it is an unaged, acid-set, non-melting farmer cheese, but with the aroma of fresh goat's milk.

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lilyhotel--did you make those dishes? What's the one on the bottom? Is it just the cheese that has been shaped, or is there more to it? It's so cute!

Another question--why is it considered a dessert? From your description it seems to be more of a savoury-food component.

Edited by prasantrin (log)
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I also saw something similar on Anthony Bourdain's show when he went to Tibet.

They also had a cheese (made from Ox's milk) that looked like a block of tofu but you ate it as is with a sugar dip. Wonder if it's the same type of cheese?

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Looks very tasty. Anywhere to get it in Northern California, say?

I can't say for sure if it's available in the US, but my wife says it's almost impossible to find outside of Yunnan. Apparently the Han and Cantonese aren't big on milk products.

Edited by Batard (log)

"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

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rubing_1.jpg

rubing_2.jpgRubing  is a firm, fresh goat milk cheese made in the Yunnan Province of China by people of the Bai and Sani (recognized as a branch of the Yi in China) minorities. 

Its Bai name is youdbap, meaning "goat's milk".

It is made by mixing heated goat's milk and a souring agent, traditionally a mixture called naiteng made from a cultivated vine.

It is often served pan fried, and dipped in salt, sugar . It may also be stir fried with vegetables in place of tofu.

Much like paneer or queso blanco, it is an unaged, acid-set, non-melting farmer cheese, but with the aroma of fresh goat's milk.

Hello-I have heard of a Bai dish called rushan 'yogurt fan' and it has been described as a yogurt waffer and is served with Hui Wei Cha (the last course of a san dao cha). Is your dish similar?

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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lilyhotel--did you make those dishes?  What's the one on the bottom?  Is it just the cheese that has been shaped, or is there more to it?  It's so cute!

Another question--why is it considered a dessert?  From your description it seems to be more of a savoury-food component.

I ate it in China. There was suger on it, tastes sweety , so I think it is a dessert.

Edited by lilyhotel (log)

welcome to my blog: chinese food picture

http://www.chinesefoodpicture.com

It's mainly about Chinese food and drinks.

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I also saw something similar on Anthony Bourdain's show when he went to Tibet. 

They also had a cheese (made from Ox's milk) that looked like a block of tofu but you ate it as is with a sugar dip.  Wonder if it's the same type of cheese?

I never went to Tibet, so, not sure of that, but Rubing looks like a block of tofu, indeed.

Edited by lilyhotel (log)

welcome to my blog: chinese food picture

http://www.chinesefoodpicture.com

It's mainly about Chinese food and drinks.

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rubing_1.jpg

rubing_2.jpgRubing  is a firm, fresh goat milk cheese made in the Yunnan Province of China by people of the Bai and Sani (recognized as a branch of the Yi in China) minorities. 

Its Bai name is youdbap, meaning "goat's milk".

It is made by mixing heated goat's milk and a souring agent, traditionally a mixture called naiteng made from a cultivated vine.

It is often served pan fried, and dipped in salt, sugar . It may also be stir fried with vegetables in place of tofu.

Much like paneer or queso blanco, it is an unaged, acid-set, non-melting farmer cheese, but with the aroma of fresh goat's milk.

Hello-I have heard of a Bai dish called rushan 'yogurt fan' and it has been described as a yogurt waffer and is served with Hui Wei Cha (the last course of a san dao cha). Is your dish similar?

They are both Yunnan specialty, dairy products.

Rushan has less moisture than rubing.

welcome to my blog: chinese food picture

http://www.chinesefoodpicture.com

It's mainly about Chinese food and drinks.

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