Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
evo-lution

The Jerry Thomas Project

Recommended Posts

bartendersguide.jpg

1. PUNCH

2. Brandy Punch

3. Brandy Punch (For a party of twenty)

4. Mississippi Punch

5. Hot Brandy And Rum Punch

6. Irish Whiskey Punch

7. Cold Whiskey Punch

8. Scotch Whiskey Punch

9. Whiskey Punch

10. Gin Punch

11. Gin Punch

12. Champagne Punch

13. Sherry Punch

14. Claret Punch

15. Sauterne Punch

16. Port Wine Punch

17. Vanilla Punch

18. Pine-Apple Punch

19. Orgeat Punch

20. Curaçao Punch

21. Roman Punch

22. Milk Punch

23. Hot Milk Punch

24. English Milk Punch

25. English Milk Punch

26. Punch à la Ford

27. Punch Jelly

28. Gin Punch

29. Glasgow Punch

30. Regent's Punch

31. Regent's Punch

32. Raspberry Punch

33. National Guard 7th Regiment Punch

34. St. Charles' Punch

35. 69th Regiment Punch

36. Louisiana Sugar-House Punch

37. Dry Punch

38. La Patria Punch

39. The Spread Eagle Punch

40. Rochester Punch

41. Imperial Punch

42. Thirty-Second Regiment or Victoria Punch

43. Rocky Mountain Punch

44. Punch Grassot

45. Light Guard Punch

46. Philadelphia Fish-House Punch*

47. Non-Such Punch

48. Canadian Punch

49. Tip-Top Punch

50. Arrack (No recipe as such)

51. Arrack Punch

52. Arrack Punch

53. Bimbo Punch

54. Cold Punch

55. Nuremburgh Punch

56. United Service Punch

57. Ruby Punch

58. Royal Punch

59. Century Club Punch

60. Duke Of Norfolk Punch

61. Queen Punch

62. Gothic Punch

63. Oxford Punch

64. Uncle Toby Punch

65. Capillaire

66. Capillaire

67. Punch à la Romaine

68. Tea Punch

69. West Indian Punch

70. Barbadoes Punch

71. Yorkshire Punch

72. Apple Punch

73. Ale Punch

74. Cider Punch

75. Nectar Punch

76. Orange Punch

77. Imperial Raspberry Whiskey Punch

78. Kirschwasser Punch

79. D'Orsay Punch

80. EGG NOGG

81. Egg Nogg

82. Hot Egg Nogg

83. Egg Nogg

84. Baltimore Egg Nogg

85. General Harrison's Egg Nogg

86. Sherry Egg Nogg

87. JULEPS

88. Mint Julep

89. Brandy Julep

90. Gin Julep

91. Whiskey Julep

92. Pineapple Julep

93. THE SMASH

94. Brandy Smash

95. Gin Smash

96. Whiskey Smash

97. THE COBBLER

98. Sherry Cobbler

99. Champagne Cobbler

100. Catawba Cobbler

101. Hock Cobbler

102. Claret Cobbler

103. Sauterne Cobbler

104. Whiskey Cobbler

105. THE COCKTAIL & CRUSTA

106. Bottle Cocktail

107. Brandy Cocktail

108. Fancy Brandy Cocktail

109. Whiskey Cocktail

110. Champagne Cocktail

111. Gin Cocktail

112. Fancy Gin Cocktail

113. Japanese Cocktail

114. Jersey Cocktail

115. Soda Cocktail

116. Brandy Crusta

117. Whiskey Crusta

118. Gin Crusta

119. MULLS AND SANGAREES

120. Mulled Wine Without Eggs

121. Mulled Wine With Eggs

122. Mulled Wine

123. Mulled Wine

124. Mulled Claret

125. Port Wine Sangaree

126. Sherry Sangaree

127. Brandy Sangaree

128. Gin Sangaree

129. Ale Sangaree

130. Porter Sangaree

131. TODDIES AND SLINGS

132. Apple Toddy

133. Brandy Toddy

134. Whiskey Toddy

135.Gin Toddy

136. Brandy Sling

137. Hot Whiskey Sling

138. Gin Sling

139. FIXES AND SOURS

140. Brandy Fix**

141. Gin Fix

142. Brandy Sour

143. Gin Sour***

144. FLIP, NEGUS AND SHRUB

145. Rum Flip

146. Rum Flip

147. Ale Flip

148. Egg Flip

149. Egg Flip

150. Brandy Flip

151. Port Wine Negus

152. Port Wine Negus

153. Soda Negus

154. Cherry Shrub

155. White Currant Shrub

156. Currant Shrub

157. Raspberry Shrub

158. Brandy Shrub

159. Rum Shrub

160. English Rum Shrub

161. FANCY DRINKS

162. Santina's Pousse Cafe

163. Parisian Pousse Cafe

164. Faivre's Pousse Cafe

165. Pousse l'Amour

166. Brandy Champerelle

167. Brandy Scaffa

168. Sleeper

169. Claret And Champagne Cup, à la Brunow

170. Ratafias

171. Balaklava Nectar

172. Crimean Cup, à la Marmora

173. Crimean Cup, à la Wyndham

174. Tom And Jerry

175. White Tiger's Milk****

176. White Lion

177. Locomotive

178. Bishop

179. Bishop

180. Archbishop

181. Cardinal

182. Pope

183. A Bishop

184. Knickerbocker

185. Rumfustian

186. Claret Cup

187. Porter Cup

187. Porter Cup

188. English Curaçao

189. Italian Lemonade

190. Quince Liqueur

191. Claret Cup, or Mulled Claret

192. Bottled Velvet

193. Champagne, Hock or Chablis Cup

194. Cider Nectar

195. Badminton

196. MISCELLANEOUS DRINKS

197. Blue Blazer

198. "Jerry Thomas" Own Decanter Bitters

199. Burnt Brandy And peach

200. Black Stripe

201 Peach And Honey

202. Gin And Pine

203. Gin And Tansy

204. Gin And Wormwood

205. Scotch Whiskey Skin

206. Columbia Skin

207. Hot Spiced Rum

208. Hot Rum

209. Stone Fence

210. Absinthe

211. Rhine Wine And Seltzer-Water

212. "Arf And Arf"

213. Brandy Straight

214. Gin Straight

215. Pony Brandy

216. Brandy And Soda

217. Brandy And Gum

218. Sherry And Egg

219. Sherry And Bitters

220. Sherry And Ice

221. TEMPERANCE DRINKS

222. Lemonade

223. Plain Lemonade

224. Lemonade

225. Orangeade

226. Orgeat Lemonade

227. Ginger Lemonade

228. Soda Nectar

229. Drink For The Dog Days

230. Sherbet

231. Lemonade Powders

232. Draught Lemonade, or Lemon Sherbet

233. Imperial Drink For Families

234. Nectar

235. Raspberry, Strawberry, Currant, or Orange Effervescing Draughts

236. Ginger Wine

*Mixture

**Santa Cruz Fix

***Santa Cruz Sour

****Aromatic Tincture

*****Raspberry Syrup

*PLEASE NOTE THIS LIST OF RECIPES WILL UNDOUBTEDLY GROW AS I PROGRESS THROUGH THE BOOK.

CLICKING THE DRINK WILL ALSO TAKE YOU TO ITS PLACE IN THE THREAD AS WELL.


Edited by evo-lution (log)

Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Table of Measurements

1 quart (imperial) = 40 ounces

1 quart (wine) = 32 ounces

1 bottle = 24 ounces

1 pint (imperial) = 20 ounces

1 pint (wine) = 16 ounces

1/2 pint (imperial) = 10 ounces

1/2 pint (wine) = 8 ounces

1 gill (imperial) = 5 ounces

1 wineglass = 2 ounces

1 jigger = 1 wineglass (also 1 1/2 ounce or 1 1/4 ounce)

1 pony = 1 ounce

1 tablespoon = 1/2 ounce

1 teaspoon = 1/3 or 1/2 tablespoon

1 dash = 1 dash

You'll also notice in the recipes the use of the word 'do.', this was an early way of saying 'ditto'.

[Thanks go to Dave Wondrich for the above information]


Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 78 punch recipes that can be found in Jerry Thomas' 'Bar Tender's Guide - How To Mix Drinks; or, The Bon Vivant's Companion', are preceded by the following piece of advice with regards the preparation of punch.

1. Punch

To make punch of any sort in perfection, the ambrosial essence of the lemon must be extracted by rubbing lumps of sugar on the rind, which breaks the delicate little vessels that contain the essence, and at the same time absorbs it.  This, and making the mixture sweet and strong, using tea instead of water, and thoroughly amalgamating all the compounds, so that the taste of neither the bitter, the sweet, the spirit, nor the element, shall be perceptible one over the other is the grand secret, only to be acquired by practice.

In making hot toddy, or hot punch, you must put in the spirits before the water: in cold punch, grog, &c., the other way.

The precise portions of spirit and water, or even of the acidity and sweetness, can have no general rule, as scarcely two persons make punch alike.


Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2. Brandy Punch

(Use large bar glass)

1 tablespoonful raspberry syrup (1/2 ounce)

2 do. white sugar (1 ounce)

1 wine-glass water (2 ounce)

1 1/2 do. brandy (3 ounce)

1/2 small sized lemon

2 slices of orange

1 piece of pineapple

Fill the tumbler with shaved ice, shake well, and dress the top with berries in season; sip through a straw.

The first drink from Jerry's book is the Brandy Punch.

It's widely believed that punches were discovered by the British in India sometime during the 16th century. The name 'Punch' is derived from the Indian word for five, 'panch', and is believed to refer to the five ingredients that made up the completed beverage; tea, arrack, sugar, lemons and water. As with most stories surrounding mixed beverages, this has many variations, which is not surprising as there's rarely someone around sober enough to keep track/note of what's going on. :laugh:

Whatever the truth regarding the exact origins of punch, it makes sense that 'punch' would have made its way over to English colonies that were settling in the New World (before America became America), from those that had settled in India.

It is known for sure that it made its way across to the other side of the globe before the 1700s, with references dating as far back as 1682. One such reference, from 1757, is attributed to an 'S.M of Boston', believed to be Samuel Mather, the son of Cotton Mather, a minister from New England . A box of lemons was sent to Sir Harry Frankland, along with the following verse:-

"You know from Eastern India came

The skill of making punch as did the name.

And as the name consists of letters five,

By five ingredients is it kept alive.

To purest water sugar must be joined,

With these the grateful acid is combined.

Some any sours they get contented use,

But men of taste do that from Tagus choose.

When now these three are mixed with care

Then added be of spirit a small share.

And that you may the drink quite perfect see,

Atop the musky nut must grated be."

Fast forward 100 years, and Punches were big, big business in America, which is apparent when you consider that a third of Jerry's book is devoted to punches (236 recipes, 79 punches). At the time, every bar was serving it, and every bartender was making it their own way. Jerry alludes to this in the passage above where he says, "The precise portions of spirit and water, or even of the acidity and sweetness, can have no general rule, as scarcely two persons make punch alike." I guess you could say this was an early form of bartender rivalry, where true mixological skill would separate the good from the bad...

The first stage in the construction of this drink is making a good quality raspberry syrup. To try and stay true to the drinks of the time, the recipe I'll be following can be found in Prof. Christian Schultz's section of the book 'Manual for the Manufacture of Cordial, Liquors, Fancy Syrups, 7c. 7c.'.

422. Raspberry Syrup

2 pints of filtered raspberry juice

4 1/2lbs of sugar

Select the fruit, either white or red.  Having picked them over, mash them in a pan, which put in a warm place until fermentation has commenced.  Let it stand for about three days.  All mucilaginous fruits require this, or else they would jelly when bottled.  Now filter the juice through a close flannel bag, or blotting-paper, and add sugar in the proportion mentioned above; this had better be powdered.  Place the syrup on the fire, and as it heats skim it carefully, but don't let it boil; or you may mix in a glass vessel or earthenware jar, and place in a pan of water on the fire.  This is a very clean way, and prevents the sides crusting and burning.  When dissolved to the 'little pearl' (see No. 12) take it off; strain through a cloth; bottle when cold; cover with tissue-paper dipped in brandy and tie down with a bladder.

12. Little Pearl

This is when you separate the thumb and finger, and the fine thread reaches, without breaking, from one to the other.

I'm not going to make the syrup to the measurements mentioned above as I don't require that much, instead I'm using only 170g of raspberries. I have mashed them up, and placed them in a warm place, which is pretty hard to find given the weather that's hit the UK in the last couple of days :shock: . As it's a smaller amount, I don't think it'll require three days resting, probably only 24 hours or so.

Until then...


Edited by evo-lution (log)

Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, the three days are up, and the syrup is completed, just waiting for it to cool overnight then I'll make the punch tomorrow (with pictures).

The fermentation process started yesterday, so thought I'd leave it for the full three days as per the recipe in the book. Left it on the stove on a really light simmer for approximately one hour until it reached the 'little pearl' stage. The completed syrup is intensely rich, and has a pronounced flavour that still manages to retain a 'freshness' or 'zing' that I guessed it would lose.

I assume that the intensity of the syrup's flavour comes from the fermentation process, which converts the sugars to acids, although I'd be interested to find out more about this.


Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're in a rush I've found the pectin (the 'mucilaginous' part of the berries) tends to float to the top when refrigerated, so I'll often just simmer and mash raspberries with sugar, strain, refrigerate and then draw off the top part. Not as elegant as Schultz's solution, but a lot quicker.


aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So, the three days are up, and the syrup is completed, just waiting for it to cool overnight then I'll make the punch tomorrow (with pictures).

The fermentation process started yesterday, so thought I'd leave it for the full three days as per the recipe in the book.  Left it on the stove on a really light simmer for approximately one hour until it reached the 'little pearl' stage.  The completed syrup is intensely rich, and has a pronounced flavour that still manages to retain a 'freshness' or 'zing' that I guessed it would lose.

I assume that the intensity of the syrup's flavour comes from the fermentation process, which converts the sugars to acids, although I'd be interested to find out more about this.

do you think the fermentation is alcoholic or a lactic bacteria fermentation? the intention here i guess is to break down pectin but i think either way this fermentation is known to increase aroma...


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In any spontaneous fermentation like this, there is going to be some fungal activity and some bacterial activity.


--

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In any spontaneous fermentation like this, there is going to be some fungal activity and some bacterial activity.

true, but one takes over and snuffs out the other. i know there are health nuts that are into lacto baccilus fermentation and they talk about minimizing the activity of other types like alcoholic to get the results they want.

is there any literature that might explain clearly what exactly the lacto type eats up and spits out? i think acidity would be increased like in certain sausage's fermentation. when pectin is metabolized (by which yeast type i don't know) it spits out methanol too but probably even a lower content than a wine.


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you're in a rush I've found the pectin (the 'mucilaginous' part of the berries) tends to float to the top when refrigerated, so I'll often just simmer and mash raspberries with sugar, strain, refrigerate and then draw off the top part. Not as elegant as Schultz's solution, but a lot quicker.

Thanks Dave!

I do agree that this method would give you similar results, although having never used a method like the one found in the book to make raspberry syrup, I was curious about the fermentation stage and if this actually added anything to the completed syrup, and wasn't just about breaking down the pectin.

do you think the fermentation is alcoholic or a lactic bacteria fermentation?  the intention here i guess is to break down pectin but i think either way this fermentation is known to increase aroma...

To be honest, I don't really know? :wacko: I'm no scientist, so I wish I could offer more than just the results which were, what appeared to be, early signs of fermentation happened after a couple days (slight foam/bubbles on top of the mashed raspberries), and the completed syrup has an intensity/flavour I didn't expect to still be there after the fermentation and simmering stages.

The only other thing I have at this stage is that the syrup is still a syrup after chilling in my fridge overnight, and hasn't turned to jelly...

I wish from a 'scientific' viewpoint that I was able to test the raspberries throughout the three days, however I may be able to do this at a later stage as I'll have to make more raspberry syrup, so if someone to tell me how I would go about doing this it'd be much appreciated!

As I said from the outset, I'm going to learn a lot through-out the completion of the project, and a lot of the information I gather will come from the contributors on e-Gullet, Barbore and The Chanticleer Society. Theoretically, the project will be completed as a collective with everyone chipping in with various information and help. :smile:


Edited by evo-lution (log)

Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, you were right! This IS a lot of discussion about about a raspberry syrup! :biggrin:


"The only time I ever said no to a drink was when I misunderstood the question."

Will Sinclair

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In any spontaneous fermentation like this, there is going to be some fungal activity and some bacterial activity.

true, but one takes over and snuffs out the other. i know there are health nuts that are into lacto baccilus fermentation and they talk about minimizing the activity of other types like alcoholic to get the results they want.

I used to have a keen interest in the microbiology of sourdough breads, which involves fermentation with both wild yeast and various lactobacilli. So I can tell you for sure that this is not correct. Are there certain conditions one could establish that minimize either yeast or lactobacillus conditions? Sure. But this isn't, generally speaking, one of them.

You also have to understand that, in a spontaneous fermentation like this, there are going to be plenty of microorganisms in there fermenting away in addition to yeast and lactobacilli. Think of lambic beers, for example, or any of the many potential contaminant organisms of homebrewed beers.

is there any literature that might explain clearly what exactly the lacto type eats up and spits out?  i think acidity would be increased like in certain sausage's fermentation.  when pectin is metabolized (by which yeast type i don't know) it spits out methanol too but probably even a lower content than a wine.

In a sugar-rich environment like this, the lactobacilli eat sugars and excrete acid. For sure, fermentation by lactobacilli will increase acidity (I should also point out that their activity is also largely halted beyond a certain pH). But, you know... all the microorganisms in there will eat a little bit of most things in the mash.


--

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first stage in the construction of the Brandy Punch (and Gin Punch) is making a good quality raspberry syrup. To try and stay true to the drinks of the time, the recipe I'll be following can be found in Prof. Christian Schultz's section of the book 'Manual for the Manufacture of Cordial, Liquors, Fancy Syrups, 7c. 7c.'.

422. Raspberry Syrup

2 pints of filtered raspberry juice

4 1/2lbs of sugar

Select the fruit, either white or red.  Having picked them over, mash them in a pan, which put in a warm place until fermentation has commenced.  Let it stand for about three days.  All mucilaginous fruits require this, or else they would jelly when bottled.  Now filter the juice through a close flannel bag, or blotting-paper, and add sugar in the proportion mentioned above; this had better be powdered.  Place the syrup on the fire, and as it heats skim it carefully, but don't let it boil; or you may mix in a glass vessel or earthenware jar, and place in a pan of water on the fire.  This is a very clean way, and prevents the sides crusting and burning.  When dissolved to the 'little pearl' (see No. 12) take it off; strain through a cloth; bottle when cold; cover with tissue-paper dipped in brandy and tie down with a bladder.

12. Little Pearl

This is when you separate the thumb and finger, and the fine thread reaches, without breaking, from one to the other.

1brandypunchaz7.jpg

2. Brandy Punch

(Use large bar glass)

1 tablespoonful raspberry syrup (1/2 ounce)

2 do. white sugar (1 ounce)

1 wine-glass water (2 ounce)

1 1/2 do. brandy (3 ounce - Hennessy Fine de Cognac - 40% ABV)

1/2 small sized lemon

2 slices of orange

1 piece of pineapple

Fill the tumbler with shaved ice, shake well, and dress the top with berries in season; sip through a straw.

Method: Squeeze lemon into glass, add water, sugar and stir until dissolved. Add raspberry syrup and brandy, fill with cracked ice and roll back and forth between glass and shaker until well mixed.

Glass: Boston

Garnish: Orange slices, piece of pineapple and fresh raspberries

Ice: Cracked ice

Notes: The fruit in the recipe is not specified to be included in the drink, and going by the picture in the book, the fruit is used as a garnish instead that was probably eaten alongside the drink. If you wanted you could shake the fruit in the drink but this would result in an unpleasant looking drink, as well as being over-diluted from the cracked ice.

A decent drink with blackcurrant and lemon on the nose. The flavour of the raspberry syrup doesn't seem to carry through very well in this drink, I just don't think the balance is right. Not a bad effort, but one that goes down as 'must do better'.

If I was to make this drink again, I'd be inclined to raise the level of the raspberry syrup and cut back on the sugar a little. I'd also be inclined to use tea instead of water, I think that would make a huge difference.

10ginpunchrs4.jpg

10. Gin Punch

(Use large bar glass)

1 tablespoonful raspberry syrup (1/2 ounce)

2 do. white sugar (1 ounce)

1 wine-glass water (2 ounce)

1 1/2 do. gin (3 ounce - Ketel One Genever - 35% ABV)

1/2 small sized lemon

2 slices of orange

1 piece of pineapple

Fill the tumbler with shaved ice.  Shake well, and ornament the top with berries in season.  Sip through a glass tube or straw.

Method: Squeeze lemon into glass, add water, sugar and stir until dissolved. Add raspberry syrup and brandy, fill with cracked ice and roll back and forth between glass and shaker until well mixed.

Glass: Boston

Garnish: Orange slices, piece of pineapple and fresh raspberries

Ice: Cracked ice

Notes: Predominant raspberry and light citrus flavours on the nose, with a smooth creaminess on the palate. I also picked up a subtle 'raspberry ripple' like flavour, but not in a sweet way. An extremely refreshing cocktail with a very striking colour, reminiscent of the colour of a well balanced Cosmopolitan. Such a shame that it's snowing outside...

This drink works very well with the garnishes if you eat them whilst drinking it.

One cocktail I'll definitely be making again, perfectly balanced and very more-ish.

PLEASE NOTE: I WILL MOVE THE GIN PUNCH WHEN I GET TO DRINK NUMBER TEN


Edited by evo-lution (log)

Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been thinking about exploring the world of punches and I think your posts have pushed me into action. Thanks so much for these, I look forward to more. I think that gin punch has my name on it.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In any spontaneous fermentation like this, there is going to be some fungal activity and some bacterial activity.

true, but one takes over and snuffs out the other. i know there are health nuts that are into lacto baccilus fermentation and they talk about minimizing the activity of other types like alcoholic to get the results they want.

I used to have a keen interest in the microbiology of sourdough breads, which involves fermentation with both wild yeast and various lactobacilli. So I can tell you for sure that this is not correct. Are there certain conditions one could establish that minimize either yeast or lactobacillus conditions? Sure. But this isn't, generally speaking, one of them.

You also have to understand that, in a spontaneous fermentation like this, there are going to be plenty of microorganisms in there fermenting away in addition to yeast and lactobacilli. Think of lambic beers, for example, or any of the many potential contaminant organisms of homebrewed beers.

is there any literature that might explain clearly what exactly the lacto type eats up and spits out?  i think acidity would be increased like in certain sausage's fermentation.  when pectin is metabolized (by which yeast type i don't know) it spits out methanol too but probably even a lower content than a wine.

In a sugar-rich environment like this, the lactobacilli eat sugars and excrete acid. For sure, fermentation by lactobacilli will increase acidity (I should also point out that their activity is also largely halted beyond a certain pH). But, you know... all the microorganisms in there will eat a little bit of most things in the mash.

i looked in amerine's "technology of wine making" but it didn't explain too much about this scenario. fermentation supposedly precipitates pectin then in this case you strained it out...

other cool and unique things probably also happened that would not make the technique obsolete. i wish i could taste it!


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The third drink in the book is another Brandy Punch, but for a party of twenty, so I'm skipping that for the moment to get a couple more recipes completed.

4. Mississippi Punch

4mississippipunchiu4.jpg

(Use large bar glass)

1 wine-glass of brandy. (2 ounce - Louis Royer Force 53 - 53% ABV)

1/2 do. Jamaica rum. (1 ounce - Appleton Special - 40% ABV)

1/2 do. Bourbon whiskey. (1 ounce - Bulleit bourbon - 40% ABV)

1/2 do. water.

1 1/2 table-spoonful of powdered white sugar.

1/4 of a large lemon

Fill a tumbler with shaved ice.

The above must be well shaken, and to those who like their draughts "like linked sweetness long drawn out," let them use a glass tube or straw to sip the nectar through.  The top of this punch should be ornamented with small pieces of orange, and berries in season.

Method: Squeeze lemon into glass, add water, sugar and stir until dissolved. Add brandy, rum and whiskey, fill with cracked ice and shake hard for 5 seconds. Pour, unstrained, into large glass to serve.

Glass: Boston

Garnish: Orange slices and fresh raspberries

Ice: Cracked ice

Notes: Considering the amount of liquor in this drink, I found it to be a very well balanced punch. It reminded me of Tiki drinks like Trader Vic's 'Scorpion', and I wouldn't be surprised if the Mississippi Punch had some sort of influence on it.

Lots of fresh lemon and grapefruit on the nose. The taste begins with a moderate sweetness, followed quickly by notes of caramel and a hint of coffee as well. I also detected a little vanilla in there. The finish is warm and predominantly from the brandy, almost chilli-chocolate like.

Fans of Crustas, Sidecars, aged rum Daiquiris and Whiskey Sours will love this drink, although I believe the addition of orgeat syrup would take this drink up a notch and make it truly sublime.

---------

And revisiting the Gin Punch, this time using the oude style of genever which would have been more prevalent in the 1800s.

10. Gin Punch (Number 2 - BOLS genever)

10ginpunchbolswt2.jpg

(Use large bar glass)

1 tablespoonful raspberry syrup (1/2 ounce)

2 do. white sugar (1 ounce)

1 wine-glass water (2 ounce)

1 1/2 do. gin (3 ounce - BOLS Genever - 42% ABV)

1/2 small sized lemon

2 slices of orange

1 piece of pineapple

Fill the tumbler with shaved ice.  Shake well, and ornament the top with berries in season.  Sip through a glass tube or straw.

Method: Squeeze lemon into glass, add water, sugar and stir until dissolved. Add raspberry syrup and brandy, fill with cracked ice and roll back and forth between glass and shaker until well mixed.

Glass: Boston

Garnish: Orange slices, piece of pineapple and fresh raspberries

Ice: Cracked ice

Notes: After my first effort using a 'jonge' style genever, I wanted to make this drink with an 'oude' style genever which would have been more prevalent in the 1800s.

Very similar to the first Gin Punch, in that the nose was predominantly raspberry with light citrus, although the grain was also apparent. The malt shines through on tasting, which balances perfectly against the raspberry syrup and lemon juice. A very creamy mouthfeel, with a subtle 'raspberry donut-like' taste, finishing with light grassy notes.

Although it's 'Cosmo-pink', and has a subtle sweetness, this is still a very grown up beverage. Phenomenal cocktail, which showcases the genever brilliantly. Highly recommended...

PLEASE NOTE: I WILL MOVE THE GIN PUNCHES WHEN I GET TO DRINK NUMBER TEN


Edited by evo-lution (log)

Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
other cool and unique things probably also happened that would not make the technique obsolete. i wish i could taste it!

I thought that you and Samuel would be interested in this. I'm making some more raspberry syrup just now, so took a photo of it after four days. What you see in the photo is just raspberries that have been mashed and left to sit. Nothing else has been added.

raspberrypureepu9.jpg

You'll notice some bubbling and a 'foam' on top of the puree.

I've been in contact with brewers near me to see if they'd be able to test the puree and tell me exactly what's going on. Is there a percentage of alcohol, etc.?


Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3. Brandy Punch

(For a party of twenty)

1 gallon of water.

3 quarts of brandy.

1/2 pint of Jamaica rum.

2 lbs. of sugar.

Juice of 6 lemons.

3 oranges sliced.

1 pine-apple, pare, and cut up.

1 gill of Curacao.

2 gills of raspberry syrup.

Ice, and add berries in season.

Mix the materials well together in a large bowl, and you have a splendid punch.

Coming soon...


Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4. Mississippi Punch

4mississippipunchiu4.jpg

(Use large bar glass)

1 wine-glass of brandy. (2 ounce - Louis Royer Force 53 - 53% ABV)

1/2 do. Jamaica rum. (1 ounce - Appleton Special - 40% ABV)

1/2 do. Bourbon whiskey. (1 ounce - Bulleit bourbon - 40% ABV)

1/2 do. water.

1 1/2 table-spoonful of powdered white sugar.

1/4 of a large lemon

Fill a tumbler with shaved ice.

The above must be well shaken, and to those who like their draughts "like linked sweetness long drawn out," let them use a glass tube or straw to sip the nectar through.  The top of this punch should be ornamented with small pieces of orange, and berries in season.

Method: Squeeze lemon into glass, add water, sugar and stir until dissolved. Add brandy, rum and whiskey, fill with cracked ice and shake hard for 5 seconds. Pour, unstrained, into large glass to serve.

Glass: Boston

Garnish: Orange slices and fresh raspberries

Ice: Cracked ice

Notes: Considering the amount of liquor in this drink, I found it to be a very well balanced punch. It reminded me of Tiki drinks like Trader Vic's 'Scorpion', and I wouldn't be surprised if the Mississippi Punch had some sort of influence on it.

Lots of fresh lemon and grapefruit on the nose. The taste begins with a moderate sweetness, followed quickly by notes of caramel and a hint of coffee as well. I also detected a little vanilla in there. The finish is warm and predominantly from the brandy, almost chilli-chocolate like.

Fans of Crustas, Sidecars, aged rum Daiquiris and Whiskey Sours will love this drink, although I believe the addition of orgeat syrup would take this drink up a notch and make it truly sublime.


Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5. Hot Brandy and Rum Punch

(For a party of fifteen)

1 quart of Jamaica rum.

1 do. Cognac brandy.

1 lb. of white loaf-sugar.

4 lemons.

3 quarts of boiling water.

1 teaspoonful of nutmeg.

Rub the sugar over the lemons until it has absorbed all the yellow part of the skins, then put the sugar into a punch-bowl; add the ingredients well together; add the rum, brandy and nutmeg; mix thoroughly, and the punch will be ready to serve.  As we have before said, it is very important, in making good punch, that all the ingredients are thoroughly incorporated; and, to insure success, the process of mixing must be dilligently attended to.  Allow a quart for four persons; but this information must be taken cum grano salis; for the capacities of persons for this kind of beverage are generally supposed to vary considerably.

Coming soon...


Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6. Irish Whiskey Punch

6irishwhiskeypunch.jpg

This is the genuine Irish beverage.  It is generally made one-third pure whiskey, two-thirds boiling water, in which the sugar has been dissolved.  If lemon punch, the rind is rubbed on the sugar, and a small proportion of juice added before the whiskey is poured in.

2 ounces Bushmills Original - 40%ABV

4 ounces boiling water

1 teaspoon caster sugar

Method: Add sugar to glass, add half the boiling water and stir until dissolved. Add the whiskey and the other half of the boiling water, stir and serve.

Glass: Glass footed/stemmed glass or mug

Garnish: N/A

Ice: N/A

Notes: A relatively simple beverage, which should be made at a ratio depending how you like your drinks. The sugar and water do enough to soften the whiskey, and it obviously goes down well on cold days, which we get many of in Scotland.

For those interested in making the drink, I highly recommend using different types of sweeteners, as well as different citrus fruits for those who prefer to have another depth of flavour. Vanilla sugar is an obvious choice which will do a lot to enhance the notes in many whiskies, although I wouldn't stop there. Honeys, syrups, flavoured sugars and preserves will all offer something different depending on the style of whisky/whiskey used.

This style of drink would more closely resemble what most people nowadays refer to as a Hot Toddy as opposed to a punch.

With regards the toddy, there is some belief that the name toddy may have derived from the traditional Indian beverage of the same name, which is made from the sap of palm trees. It's easy to see why there may be a link to India if you take into account how similar a traditional Indian Punch(arrack, sugar, lemon, tea, water) is to what we'd call a Hot Toddy (whisky, sweetener, lemon juice, hot water and sometimes spices), although toddy may have been an old Scottish term for water.

This is believed to relate to 'Tod's Well' which used to supply Edinburgh with water. This is referenced in Scottish poet Allan Ramsay's 'The Morning Interview' (Pages 16-17), published in the early 1700s.

"A sumptuous Treat does crown the ended War,

And all rich Requisites are brought from far,

The Table boasts its being from JAPAN,

The ingenious work of some great artisan.

CHINA, where potters coarsest Mould refine,

That Light through the transparent jar does shine,

The costly plates and Dishes are from thence,

And AMAZONIA must her Sweets dispense;

To her warm Banks, our vessels cut the Main,

For the sweet Product of her luscious Cane;

Here SCOTIA does no costly Tribute bring,

Only some Kettles of + TODIAN spring."

-----------------------------------------------------------

+ TOD'S-WELL which supplies the City with Water

With the name of the spring in mind, and taking into account the style of writing in the poem, it may be assumed that 'toddy' was an amusing term for water in Scotland. This belief is strengthened by the fact that whisky at the time was referred to as aqua, also remembering whisky took its name from water (uisge). So water was toddy, and whisky was aqua.

Here's a link to an article from the New York Times, printed on January 1st 1871 - http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html...FB766838A669FDE. For whatever reason the link doesn't open when you click on it so you'll have to copy and paste it. :?


Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7. Cold Whiskey Punch

(For a party)

7coldwhiskeypunch.jpg

This beverage ought always to be made with boiling water, and allowed to concoct and cool for a day or two before it is put on the table.  In this way, the materials get more intensely amalgamated than cold water and cold whiskey will ever get.  As to the beautiful mutual adaptation of cold rum and cold water, that is beyond all praise, being one of Nature's most exquisite achievements. (See "Glasgow Punch," No.29.)

1/3 Bushmills Black Bush - 40%ABV

2/3 boiling water

Lemon juice to taste

Sugar to taste

Method: Add sugar to mixing glass, add half the boiling water and stir until dissolved. Add the whiskey, the other half of the boiling water (and lemon juice if applicable), stir and allow to cool. Bottle and refrigerate.

Glass: Rocks

Garnish: N/A

Ice: N/A

Notes: There's a definite difference in flavour between a 'fresh' Cold Whiskey Punch versus one that's been prepared a day or two in advance, although what the difference is down to is up for debate, and whether it's better is also arguable. Lemon juice should be added upon serving if required.

Again, ratios depend on how you like your drinks.

I much preferred the Cold Whiskey Punch with the addition of lemon juice, which is not to say that without it's a bad drink. Both let the subtleties of the whisky come through, with just a hint of sweetness. The most enjoyable part of the drink was the mouthfeel which really stuck to the insides of the mouth like syrup, due to the cooled sugar/water mixture.

The lemon enhanced the floral/citrus notes so I'd recommend using Irish whisky, or a Scottish lowland malt, should you prefer it with lemon juice. For those that prefer a mix of whisky/water/sugar, I'd opt for your preffered whisky/whiskey of choice, where you should hopefully pick up different notes in the spirit than you would drinking it neat or with a drop of water.


Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8. Scotch Whiskey Punch

8scotchwhiskeypunch.jpg

Steep the thin yellow shavings of lemon peel in the whiskey, which should be Glenlivet or Islay, of the best quality; the sugar should be dissolved in boiling water.  As it requires genius to make whiskey punch, it would be impertinent to give proportions.  (See "Spread Eagle Punch," No. 39.)

2 strips lemon peel

2 ounce Laphroaig 10 year old - 40%ABV

3 ounce boiling water

1 teaspoon caster sugar

Method: Peel two long strips of lemon peel, snap over the whisky, and drop in. Add sugar to glass, add half the boiling water and stir until dissolved. Add the whiskey, the other half of the boiling water, stir and serve.

Glass: Glass footed/stemmed glass or mug

Garnish: N/A

Ice: N/A

Notes: As a fan of Islay/Island malts, I was looking forward to this drink, and I wasn't disappointed. The lemon really changes the notes usually found in Laphroaig. Typical notes of salt and seaweed were still there on the palate, with iodine on the finish, however there was an enhanced fruity sweetness reminiscent of pear and melon, as well as dried fruit like apricot. The vanilla was also more predominant at the finish.

As before, ratios are dependent on preferred tastes.

I'll definitely be trying different Islay/Island malts in this style, and also in the 'Cold Whiskey Punch' style.


Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9. Whiskey Punch

9whiskeypunch.jpg

(Use small bar glass)

1 wine-glass whiskey (Irish or Scotch). (2 ounce Auchentoshan 10 year old - 40%ABV)

2 do. boiling water. (4 ounce boiling water)

Sugar to taste. (1 teaspoon caster sugar)

Dissolve the sugar well with 1 wine-glass of the water, then pour in the whisky, and add the balance of the water, sweeten to taste, and put in a small piece of lemon rind, or a thin slice of lemon.

Method: Add sugar to glass, add half the boiling water and stir until dissolved. Add the whiskey and the other half of the boiling water, stir and serve. Finish with a strip of lemon peel snapped over the drink and place in

Glass: Glass footed/stemmed glass or mug

Garnish: N/A

Ice: N/A

Notes: Pretty much covered this drink with the last couple of recipes, so there's nothing really more I can add.

Regarding the drink, as Auchentoshan 10 year old is a light malt, and the main flavour notes I detect are fresh grass and lemon, I chose to use a strip of peel as opposed to a slice of lemon, as I believed it would benefit from the use of zest over the juice which would've gotten into the drink from a slice. Again, the use of different sweeteners depending on the whisky/whiskey used would add real depth to the drink, as well as the addition of bitters like orange/peach/grapefruit.


Evo-lution - Consultancy, Training and Events

Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Bitters - Bitters

The Jerry Thomas Project - Tipplings and musings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...