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Craig E

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Posts posted by Craig E

  1. Last night I tried this All Jacked Up. Mezcal, sweet vermouth, Lairds apple brandy, Fernet Branca, maraschino, apple garnish.

    I had to resort to the Applejack I had on hand, though the spec (despite the cocktail's name) calls for pure apple brandy. 

    If you like apple drinks (and probably especially if you have the real Laird's) this is worth a try--I found the balance to be just right with the complexity leant by smoky mezcal and menthol/bitter fernet. 

    Mostly I'm proud of my first apple fan!

     

    alljackedup 1.png

    • Like 7
  2. Lonesome Dove

    Muddled blackberries, lemon juice, honey syrup, bourbon, allspice dram.

    Nice maroon color. Pretty tasty, reminded me of the bottled dark grape juice that used to be standard issue for kids' snacktime in the 70s and 80s.

    I think I prefer the cleaner taste of a gin-based bramble. 

    lonesomedove.png

    • Like 1
  3. And To All A Goodnight

    • 1 1/2 oz bourbon
    • 3/4 oz reposado tequila
    • 3/4 oz Cherry Heering
    • 2 dashes orange bitters
    • 1 dash Angostura

    Stir; strain; up; orange twist.

    My test for drinks that include Cherry Heering is usually: does it avoid a medicinal quality? This one passes the test. The tequila seemed like the odd inclusion looking at the recipe, but its green vegetal qualities are a nice inclusion. A good boozy tipple.

    andtoallagoodnight.png

    • Like 2
  4. This is a favorite: Dead Man's Mule. Absinthe, orgeat, pimento dram, lime, ginger beer. Doing it up right this time (previously I settled for Herbsaint and almond-milk-made orgeat, this time it's the real thing on both counts). 

    deadmansmule.png

    • Like 4
  5. If you can't find it locally and are not interested in mail-order, there are a number of DIY recipes here on the site and elsewhere on the web. The simplest way to fake it may be to follow this emergency orgeat recipe which involves almond milk, sugar, orange blossom water, rose water, and rum (or this one which is almond milk, simple syrup, almond extract, and orange flower water) and takes less time than the real thing. But if you have a little time, making the real thing isn't too difficult at all. 

    If even the least of these is still more effort than you want, you could look for the clear almond syrup that is sometimes found in stores among coffee flavorers. 

  6. 8 hours ago, Danne said:

    Thanks. 

    The cocktail underneath the bookmark,
    Bacardi Special Cocktail*
    1 teaspoon grenadine

    1/3 Burrogh's Beefeater Gin 
    2/3 Bacardi Rum
    The Juice of half a lime

    So Would all Savoy cocktailbooks from the 30ies be like this?

     

    Ah, I notice in the digitized 1930 version here that the Bacardi Cocktail is listed at the end of the book, in a section called Additional Cocktails which may have been late additions, but appear to have been printed on full pages in the edition. So now I'm thinking in your copy somebody has cut out the Bacardi cocktail and stuck it in where it belongs alphabetically. 

    Does your edition have the "Additional Cocktails" on pages 282-283? 

  7. Looks to me like what publishers would call a tipped-in erratum slip--added when an editing mistake (like a missing recipe) is discovered after the printing of the book's pages is complete.

    Maybe the Bacardi marketing people had a little talk with the publishers before the book release...

  8. A White Palmetto of sorts: agricole blanc, vermouth blanc, mole bitters, orange twist.

    A bit thin in texture, some interesting fruit flavors in there (pear first, then mango?), but my unimpressed wife said it tastes a bit like a shoe-repair store, and I think I glimpsed what she was talking about. 

    I think every rum agricole drink I've had starts shakily but gains a star rating by the time I finish it.

    whitepalmetto.png

    • Like 2
  9. May I present the Ski Mask #1? 

    I don't own, and in fact have never tried, kummel, but Google taught me it is a liqueur with caraway, cumin, and fennel flavors, which made me think of aquavit, which I do have. But that's a spirit rather than a liqueur, so subbing outright would be taking away the sweetness of the drink. Thus, I thought blanc vermouth could go in for the (also grape-based) cognac. 

    So: over cracked ice in a wine glass, stir 1 1/2 oz. each Tattersall aquavit and Dolin blanc, 1/4 oz. homemade grenadine. 

    IMG_2813.png

    It's pretty good, though never having tried a Balaklava #1, I don't know how similar it is. 

    I can imagine that lengthening this with some bubbly soda would work too. 

    • Like 2
  10. I saw that the cocktails sub-Reddit has started up an original cocktail challenge. If it gains some momentum maybe it can pick up where Mixology Monday left off. At any rate, their first theme was "Spring has sprung: botanical booze." So I set out to create something as herby/planty as possible.

     

    I knew I wanted to build on silver tequila, because I love the bell-peppery freshness of agave it has. Artichoke-based Cynar seemed like a thematically appropriate "deepener." That combo works well in the Santucci, so I took inspiration from there to think about a role for cucumber, which I happened to have in the fridge, first as a garnish but eventually also muddled in the mix. Drambuie seemed like an appropriate sweetener bringing in some floral notes (though the drink was already sweet--much of the refining of the recipe was cutting back the Drambuie). A subtle green chartreuse rinse adds complexity and a squirt of lemon peel a little brightness. 

     

    So the final recipe:

    HERB TARLEK

    Muddle two slices of peeled cucumber in a mixing glass. Add 1 1/2 oz. silver tequila, 1 oz. Cynar, 1/4 oz. Drambuie and stir well with ice. Rinse a chilled glass with green Chartreuse. Double strain into prepared glass and express and discard lemon twist. Garnish with thin cucumber slice.

    herbtarlek 1.png

    • Like 2
  11. Tonight tried a Sea Pea Fizz, more or less:

    3/4 oz. each Herbsaint, simple syrup, lemon juice, and aquafaba, dry shook and shook and strained and topped with soda. 

    Actually I ran out of simple and was too lazy to mix up a new batch, so I supplemented with honey syrup I had on hand and that worked quite well. Wife and I agreed, though we're not huge anise-flavor fans, this was a winner. 

    No pic, but here's the musical accompaniment

  12. One Flight Up: Campo de Encanto pisco (Capel), Dolin blanc, lemon, simple, orange flower water, Angostura bitters, and egg white (aquafaba), layered over Campari and soda, with orange and lemon twists.

    A fun drink with bitter bottom through the straw, and creamy orangey sips from the top. 

     

    oneflightup.png

    • Like 4
  13. Latest, and most successful, trial at a Presidente. 

    I learned from other threads here that blanc rather than dry vermouth is probably historically accurate, and in any event better tasting. Starting point for these ratios was the Cienfuegos house recipe I found on Kindred, but an anonymous commenter there suggested Smith & Cross instead of the demerara rum in the spec, which I tried. So it was

    • 3/4 oz Smith & Cross overproof rum
    • 3/4 oz Clement unaged agricole
    • 3/4 oz Dolin Blanc
    • 1/4 Pierre Ferrand dry curacao
    • 1 barspoon homemade grenadine
    • lemon twist

    Stirred and served up. 

    presidente.png

    • Like 3
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