Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Christopher Haatuft

Leek ashes...

Recommended Posts

The restaurant Im starting work at the august has leek ashes as an ingredient on their menu. I have also heard Mugaritz has had this on their menu. Whats it like and how do you prepare it? Is there any other form of ashes that have any culinary value?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

as far as culinary value, there are some cheeses (morbier and humboldt fog, for example) that have a layer of ashes in the center--for morbier, i heard that the layer separates the morning milk form the evening milk...don't know if that's strictly true, but it is charming..

will be interested to hear about the leek ashes--what dish do they appear in at your new place?


"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had leek ashes at a Juan Mari Arzak dinner in Hong Kong. (Arzak wasn't here but one of his chefs cooked). It was a sauce - very dark, tasted like burnt leeks (but it was not unpleasant) and had a very slight gritty texture on the tongue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Morbier from boutique producers has an ash line between the morning and evening milk, but I've been told (by the head of the cheese department at Zabar's) that in the commercial versions it's just for show. She also said that the line in Humboldt Fog is just for show.

How about the ash-coated logs of chevre?


Edited by k43 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand that in the case of Morbier and other cheeses, the ash was originally there to protect against insects. I.e., the tub of milk from the morning is hanging around, waiting for the evening's milk to be added, so a layer of ashes is added to protect the morning's milk from bugs and other stuff. Maybe the case is similar with the ash-coated chevre logs.

Leek ashes sound very strange. Why would you want to eat carbon of any kind? :hmmm:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Spain they call it "aceite de humo", something like "smoked oil". They cook sliced leeks in a low oven untli burnt. Then they powder it in a food processor (or blender) and mix it with olive oil. Season and serve as a sauce. What it does is it gives the dish some smokiness (without actually smoking anything).


Follow me @chefcgarcia

Fábula, my restaurant in Santiago, Chile

My Blog, en Español

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
as far as culinary value, there are some cheeses (morbier and humboldt fog, for example) that have a layer of ashes in the center--for morbier, i heard that the layer separates the morning milk form the evening milk...don't know if that's strictly true, but it is charming..

will be interested to hear about the leek ashes--what dish do they appear in at your new place?

actually I cant remember, and the menu on their website looks like it was from this winter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In Spain they call it "aceite de humo", something like "smoked oil". They cook sliced leeks in a low oven untli burnt. Then they powder it in a food processor (or blender) and mix it with olive oil. Season and serve as a sauce. What it does is it gives the dish some smokiness (without actually smoking anything).

hmm...interesting. but why leek? do they use the whole leek, or only the green or white part?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In Spain they call it "aceite de humo", something like "smoked oil". They cook sliced leeks in a low oven untli burnt. Then they powder it in a food processor (or blender) and mix it with olive oil. Season and serve as a sauce. What it does is it gives the dish some smokiness (without actually smoking anything).

Yes, that's how they did it here - mixed it into olive oil and served very sparingly as a sauce.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hmm...interesting. but why leek? do they use the whole leek, or only the green or white part?

I don't know why leek. Maybe somebody makes it with something else. It might have to do with the final flavor (not too burnt?) or the amount of water in the leeks.

I've seen the whole leek being used, so my guess is they actually, in restaurants, only use the scraps.


Follow me @chefcgarcia

Fábula, my restaurant in Santiago, Chile

My Blog, en Español

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...