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Joy

Feijoada

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I'd love to be able to make my own, bet its relatively easy to have a pot of porky loveliness bubbling away on my stove. Anyone try doing it?

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I'd love to, also, but I'm too lazy. I just eat it out. According to the Time-Life Foods of the World volume on Latin American Cooking, a feijoada completa for eight to ten people entails:

1. Orange slices

2. Rice

3. Collard greens or kale

4. Pepper-and-lemon sauce

5. Butter farofa (toasted manioc meal), garnished with hard-cooked eggs and stuffed green olives

6. Black beans

7. Batida paulista, a rum-lemon drink (although caiparinha would probably do)

8. Fresh beef

9. Smoked beef tongue

10. Corned spareribs

11. Smoked sausages

12. Jerked (dried) beef

13. Fresh pork sausages

14. Slab and/or Canadian bacon

Whew! That's why you eat it for lunch on Saturday and then nap until it's time to go out and party. :raz:

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Yes, this is a dish which will need some serious shopping. I too have never made it, and the food versions tend to contain more adventurous meats than Time-Life contemplates. Ears are pretty much de rigeur.

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I too have never made it, and the food versions tend to contain more adventurous meats than Time-Life contemplates.  Ears are pretty much de rigeur.

Yes I once saw a snout peeking out at me in a feijoada on a Danbury, CT Brazilian steamtable.

I've also seen hooves and other piggy parts that less adventurous people might turn up their snouts at.

Suzanne-- I'm assuming the the Batida paulista is meant to accompany the feijoada and not go in it?

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greens to live on: couve in brasil, like jamaica's calalloo.

farofa is dangerously good

don't dig in to the dende, palm oil though.

do play elis regina and tom jobim.


Edited by lissome (log)

Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at all seasons: That is all there is to distinguish us from the other Animals.

-Beaumarchais

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Suzanne-- I'm assuming the the Batida paulista is meant to accompany the feijoada and not go in it?

Me too.

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According to the Time-Life Foods of the World volume on Latin American Cooking, :

I am delighted to see that someone else here owns some/all of the Foods of the World Series. Ours are very old, and we still pull them out for reference. Yeah, not the most cutting edge or modern, but they stand up extremely well to time. And the recipes tend to work.

But I digress....

I wanted to say: That would be some severely awesome potluck. Fabulous idea.


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Having shared an overly large plate of this with a slightly derranged someone at the weekend ( squealing girlishly for hoof meat is rarely dignified ) I intend to try and cook for this myself next week sometime

The dish I tried was a bit sanitised I fear with none of the bits that offend. it was however tasty none the less with great chunks of sausage

If I had one criticism it would be that it lacked a bit of heat and was much better with the provided hot sauce.

I am not sure that I will be able to get hold of the Brazilian black beans. What can I substitute?

S

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Are you in England, Simon? I should've thought any kind of black bean would do; most New York supermarkets have them.

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Are you in England, Simon?  I should've thought any kind of black bean would do; most New York supermarkets have them.

I am back home in Blighty

I can get black beans easily enough, but I am told I need a particular sort. Unless, of course, I have been told complete bollocks by someone........

S

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Ah, that I don't know, but logic suggests that a different sort of black bean would be the best substitute. I'd be worried about getting the manioc flour - but maybe it's everywhere, I've never had cause to look.


Edited by Wilfrid (log)

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Its true, Brazilian black beans are about 30% smaller than regular ones and more intensely flavored as well. Regular black beans can of course be used but as long as you're going thru the trouble of making feijoada, why not go all the way?

Manioc flour would not be an issue for us, there's a big Brazilian population in Astoria and lots of Brazilian markets. For Simon, probably not as easy but carbs=death so problem solved.

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Right, he can just eat the ears. Although he may personally feel that smacks of cannibalism.

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thE feijoada in rio's at the copacabana palace, not so long ago redone to the tune of millions. every weekend but especially for mardi gras


Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at all seasons: That is all there is to distinguish us from the other Animals.

-Beaumarchais

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I'd love to be able to make my own, bet its relatively easy to have a pot of porky loveliness bubbling away on my stove. Anyone try doing it?

Lets do it while the weather is still cool...

Feijoada

Choucroute

Cassoulet

Pot au Feu

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This is a stable in my house and has always been. people at work look at me funny when i tell them i eat it. In portugal we make it with white beans, pigs feet, tripe, sausage, onions, and just about anything else you want to throw in there. Its all jelly like almost like a casoulet of sort but a bit different.

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I'd love to be able to make my own, bet its relatively easy to have a pot of porky loveliness bubbling away on my stove. Anyone try doing it?

Lets do it while the weather is still cool...

Feijoada

Choucroute

Cassoulet

Pot au Feu

CHOLENT!!!!!

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This is a stable in my house and has always been. people at work look at me funny when i tell them i eat it. In portugal we make it with white beans, pigs feet, tripe, sausage, onions, and just about anything else you want to throw in there. Its all jelly like almost like a casoulet of sort but a bit different.

Oh oh oh! Could you expand upon your method?

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I'd love to be able to make my own, bet its relatively easy to have a pot of porky loveliness bubbling away on my stove. Anyone try doing it?

Lets do it while the weather is still cool...

Feijoada

Choucroute

Cassoulet

Pot au Feu

CHOLENT!!!!!

Girlz: Anytime. Anyplace.

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I will ask my mom but i know its a process. The beans are cooked seperate first. The tripe has to be picked through and cleaned. Then it has to be boiled for an hour untill tender. Then it has to be cut up into small pieces. Then you have to cut the pigs feet up to pieces. Then you can start to make it. render some bacon and sausage. saute some basic mirepoix with alot of garlic. deglaze with some white wine and add all the rest of the ingredients into the pot. Cover with some stock or water. Bring up to simmer and simmer until everything is really tender usually i think its at least an hour or two. Some people finish it with herbs. But it doesn't really need it again its your choice.

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I am working in Brazil and we have this delight every Sunday. (just had calf's foot for lunch)

As they are as good a butchers as they are cooks, so it resembles nothing so much as the result of a machete fight between a cow and a pig in a tub of black beans. It is a stark contrast to the sublime French cassoulet.

I am the only white man on board who eats it, and with little relish. Their tripe or calf's foot and potato stews are much better.

They actually eat black beans and rice with every meal, just as my compatriots have fries.

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