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liuzhou

liuzhou

Yubu village (雨卜村 yǔ bǔ cūn) is tiny. One street and surrounding fields. A four dog village. But deep in the heart of Miao territory.

 

IMG_6467.thumb.jpg.78fb934d4f4e98c7ca4776fe66ba2d11.jpg

Village Gate

 

IMG_6675.thumb.jpg.03344fc9e3f9bf6d0c9021d5723bef90.jpg

The Street

 

IMG_6680.thumb.jpg.adc96091712b0d0598d639d7f97dc91b.jpg

The Dogs

 

IMG_6653.thumb.jpg.8301d02080c402b75c7966fbaf73a58b.jpg

 

IMG_6662.thumb.jpg.9a39cb45fc0ebf1e64f849ecd1f1c7f7.jpg

Houses

 

But enough of this , I'm hungry after all that climbing mountain lark.

 

So to dinner in the village's only restaurant, which specialises in local freshwater fish.

 

20171129_183931.thumb.jpg.8e36be6fd5add13e2551435ff125e011.jpg

Fish and Tofu Soup

 

20171129_183438.thumb.jpg.0b9e9ca253d74bfa2794c6dc2209fadf.jpg

Purple Potato

 

20171129_183131.thumb.jpg.3300c73c54a6312b26e152fb5a01783e.jpg

Braised Chicken

 

20171129_183739.thumb.jpg.9c75b234fee58b8d5bc94fa07e59dab6.jpg

Deep fried fish stuffed wonton-like things.

 

20171129_183518.thumb.jpg.a5e334c193e2e229b8045142226846c4.jpg

Duck

 

20171129_183550.thumb.jpg.a8f7a1ca0e02a0be9592d8d9f5e0427e.jpg

Pumpkin

 

20171129_184140.thumb.jpg.0b4e8db6257dba0ac372e8aa88f3ce63.jpg

A different kind of fish fritters

 

20171129_184904.thumb.jpg.480990d2f789ec29f93cb2f1e6d78dc6.jpg

Daikon Parsnip

 

20171129_184202.thumb.jpg.3acef42aaaea1c3a685fc3dfa0e6e79c.jpg

Pickled Bamboo

 

20171129_184220.thumb.jpg.95cabcc8079e0b3a19ce2c226404a6ab.jpg

Steamed Fish - this was GOOD.

 

20171129_184749.thumb.jpg.ddb79e936974d9e539ebf96d2edcec8c.jpg

Beef with Green Chilli Peppers

 

20171129_185552.thumb.jpg.cb776ca7162bdf58cf323fa45833a47e.jpg

Another egg and vegetable pancake - this time with a vinegar and soy sauce chilli dip.

 

20171129_190643.thumb.jpg.5df2fb0dd612e8eea548a8bca61de59b.jpg

Vegetation

 

Again, everything we ate was grown, raised or produced in the village's surrounding countryside..

 

More to come....

liuzhou

liuzhou

Yubu village (雨卜村 yǔ bǔ cūn) is tiny. One street and surrounding fields. A four dog village. But deep in the heart of Miao territory.

 

IMG_6467.thumb.jpg.78fb934d4f4e98c7ca4776fe66ba2d11.jpg

Village Gate

 

IMG_6675.thumb.jpg.03344fc9e3f9bf6d0c9021d5723bef90.jpg

The Street

 

IMG_6680.thumb.jpg.adc96091712b0d0598d639d7f97dc91b.jpg

The Dogs

 

IMG_6653.thumb.jpg.8301d02080c402b75c7966fbaf73a58b.jpg

 

IMG_6662.thumb.jpg.9a39cb45fc0ebf1e64f849ecd1f1c7f7.jpg

Houses

 

But enough of this , I'm hungry after all that climbing mountain lark.

 

So to dinner in the village's only restaurant, which specialises in local freshwater fish.

 

20171129_183931.thumb.jpg.8e36be6fd5add13e2551435ff125e011.jpg

Fish and Tofu Soup

 

20171129_183438.thumb.jpg.0b9e9ca253d74bfa2794c6dc2209fadf.jpg

Purple Potato

 

20171129_183131.thumb.jpg.3300c73c54a6312b26e152fb5a01783e.jpg

Braised Chicken

 

20171129_183739.thumb.jpg.9c75b234fee58b8d5bc94fa07e59dab6.jpg

Deep fried fish stuffed wonton-like things.

 

20171129_183518.thumb.jpg.a5e334c193e2e229b8045142226846c4.jpg

Duck

 

20171129_183550.thumb.jpg.a8f7a1ca0e02a0be9592d8d9f5e0427e.jpg

Pumpkin

 

20171129_184140.thumb.jpg.0b4e8db6257dba0ac372e8aa88f3ce63.jpg

A different kind of fish fritters

 

20171129_184904.thumb.jpg.480990d2f789ec29f93cb2f1e6d78dc6.jpg

Daikon Parsnip

 

20171129_184202.thumb.jpg.3acef42aaaea1c3a685fc3dfa0e6e79c.jpg

Pickled Bamboo

 

20171129_184220.thumb.jpg.95cabcc8079e0b3a19ce2c226404a6ab.jpg

Steamed Fish - this was GOOD.

 

20171129_184749.thumb.jpg.ddb79e936974d9e539ebf96d2edcec8c.jpg

Beef with Green Chilli Peppers

 

20171129_185552.thumb.jpg.cb776ca7162bdf58cf323fa45833a47e.jpg

Another egg and vegetable pancake - this time with a vinegar and soy sauce chilli dip.

 

20171129_190643.thumb.jpg.5df2fb0dd612e8eea548a8bca61de59b.jpg

Vegetation

 

More to come....

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      Note: This follows on from the Munching with the Miao topic.
       
      The three-hour journey north from Miao territory ended up taking four, as the driver missed a turning and we had to drive on to the next exit and go back. But our hosts waited for us at the expressway exit and lead us up a winding road to our destination - Buyang 10,000 mu tea plantation (布央万亩茶园 bù yāng wàn mǔ chá yuán) The 'mu' is  a Chinese measurement of area equal to 0.07 of a hectare, but the 10,000 figure is just another Chinese way of saying "very large".
       
      We were in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, where 57% of the inhabitants are Dong.
       
      The Dong people (also known as the Kam) are noted for their tea, love of glutinous rice and their carpentry and architecture. And their hospitality. They tend to live at the foot of mountains, unlike the Miao who live in the mid-levels.
       
      By the time we arrived, it was lunch time, but first we had to have a sip of the local tea. This lady did the preparation duty.
       

       

       
      This was what we call black tea, but the Chinese more sensibly call 'red tea'. There is something special about drinking tea when you can see the bush it grew on just outside the window!
       
      Then into lunch:
       

       

      Chicken Soup
       

      The ubiquitous Egg and Tomato
       

      Dried fish with soy beans and chilli peppers. Delicious.
       

      Stir fried lotus root
       

      Daikon Radish
       

      Rice Paddy Fish Deep Fried in Camellia Oil - wonderful with a smoky flavour, but they are not smoked.
       

      Out of Focus Corn and mixed vegetable
       

      Fried Beans
       

      Steamed Pumpkin
       

      Chicken
       

      Beef with Bitter Melon
       

      Glutinous (Sticky) Rice
       

      Oranges
       

      The juiciest pomelo ever. The area is known  for the quality of its pomelos.
       
      AFter lunch we headed out to explore the tea plantation.
       

       

       

       

       
      Interspersed with the tea plants are these camellia trees, the seeds of which are used to make the Dong people's preferred cooking oil.
       

       
      As we climbed the terraces we could hear singing and then came across this group of women. They are the tea pickers. It isn't tea picking time, but they came out in their traditional costumes to welcome us with their call and response music. They do often sing when picking. They were clearly enjoying themselves.
       

       
      And here they are:
       
       
      After our seranade we headed off again, this time to the east and the most memorable meal of the trip. Coming soon.
       
       
    • By liuzhou
      These have been mentioned a couple of times recently on different threads and I felt they deserved one of their own. After all, they did keep me alive when I lived in Xi'an.
       
      Rou jia mo (ròu jiá mò; literally "Meat Sandwich") are Chinese sandwiches which originated in Shaanxi Province, but can be found all over China. Away from their point of origin, they tend to be made with long stewed pork belly. However in Xi'an (capital of Shaanxi), there is a large Muslim population so the meat of choice is more usually beef. In nearby Gansu Province, lamb or mutton is more likely.
       
      When I was living in Xi'an in 1996-1997, I lived on these. I was living on campus in North-West University (西北大学) and right outside the school gate was a street lined with cheap food joints, most of which would serve you one. I had one favourite place which I still head to when I visit. First thing I do when I get off the train.
       
      What I eat is Cumin Beef Jia Mo (孜然牛肉夹馍 zī rán niú ròu jiá mò). The beef is stir fried or BBQd with cumin and mild green peppers. It is also given a bit of a kick with red chill flakes.
       
      Here is a recipe wrested from the owner of my Xi'an favourite. So simple, yet so delicious.
       

      Lean Beef
       
      Fairly lean beef is cut into slivers
       

      Chopped Beef (sorry about the picture quality - I don't know what happened)
       

      Chopped garlic
       
      I use this single clove garlic from Sichuan, but regular garlic does just fine.
       
      The beef and garlic are mixed in a bowl and generously sprinkled with ground cumin. This is then moistened with a little light soy sauce. You don't want to flood it. Set aside for as long as you can.
       

      Mild Green Chilli Pepper
       
      Take one or two mild green peppers and crush with the back of a knife, then slice roughly. You could de-seed if you prefer. I don't bother.
       

      Chopped Green Pepper
       
      Fire up the wok, add oil (I use rice bran oil) and stir fry the meat mixture until the meat is just done. 
       

      Frying Tonight
       
      Then add the green peppers and fry until they are as you prefer them. I tend to like them still with a bit of crunch, so slightly under-cook them
       

      In with the peppers
       
      You will, of course, have prepared the bread. The sandwiches are made with a type of flat bread known as 白吉饼 (bái jí bǐng; literally "white lucky cake-shape"). The ones here are store bought but I often make them. Recipe below.
       

      Bai Ji Bing
       
      Take one and split it. Test the seasoning of the filling, adding salt if necessary. It may not need it because of the soy sauce. 
       

      Nearly there
       
      Cover to make a sandwich  and enjoy. You will see that I have used a bunch of kitchen paper to hold the sandwich and to soak up any escaping juices. But it should be fairly dry.
       

      The final product.
       
      Note: I usually cook the meat and pepper in batches. Enough for one sandwich per person at a time. If we need another (and we usually do) I start the next batch. 
       
       
      Bread Recipe
       
       
      350g plain flour
      140ml water
      1/2 teaspoon instant yeast

      Mix the yeast with the flour and stir in the water. Continue stirring until a dough forms. Knead until smooth. Cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap and leave to rise by about one third. (maybe 30-40 minutes).
       
      Knead again to remove any air then roll the dough into a log shape around 5cm in diameter, then cut into six portions. Press these into a circle shape using a rolling pin. You want to end up with 1.5cm thick buns. 
       
      Preheat oven to 190C/370F.
       
      Dry fry the buns in a skillet until they take on some colour about a minute or less on each side, then finish in the oven for ten minutes. Allow to cool before using.
    • By Chris Hennes
      I just got a copy of Grace Young's "Stir-Frying to the Sky's Edge"—I enjoyed cooking from "Breath of a Wok" and wanted to continue on that path. Does anyone else have this book? Have you cooked anything from it?

      Here was dinner tonight:

      Spicy Dry-Fried Beef (p. 70)

      I undercooked the beef just a bit due to a waning propane supply (I use an outdoor propane-powered wok burner), but there's nothing to complain about here. It's a relatively mild dish that lets the flavors of the ingredients (and the wok) speak. Overall I liked it, at will probably make it again (hopefully with a full tank of gas).


    • By liuzhou
      We are all used to unami now. Maybe it's time to consider gan. Particularly found in teas, but also in other foods. An interesting article from a great magazine.
       
      Going, going gan
    • By liuzhou
      I’m an idiot. It’s official.
       
      A couple of weeks back, on another thread, the subject of celtuce and its leafing tops came up (somewhat off-topic). Someone said that the tops are difficult to find in Asian markets and I replied that I also find the tops difficult to find here in China. Nonsense. They are very easy to find. They just go under a completely different name from the stems – something which had slipped my very slippery mind.
       
      So, here on-topic is some celtuce space.
       
      First, for those who don’t know what celtuce is, let me say it is a variety of lettuce which looks nothing like a lettuce. It is very popular in southern mainland China and Taiwan. It is also known in English as stem lettuce, celery lettuce, asparagus lettuce, or Chinese lettuce. In Chinese it is 莴笋 wō sǔn or 莴苣 wō jù, although the latter can simply mean lettuce of any variety.

      Lactuca sativa var. asparagina is 'celtuce' for the technically minded.
       

       
      Those in the picture are about 40 cm (15.7 inches) long and have a maximum diameter of 5 cm (2 inches). The stems are usually peeled, sliced and used in various stir fries, although they can also be braised, roasted etc. The taste is somewhere between lettuce and celery, hence the name. The texture is more like the latter.
       
      The leafing tops are, as I said, sold separately and under a completely different name. They are 油麦菜 yóu mài cài.
       

       
      These taste similar to Romaine lettuce and can be eaten raw in salads. In Chinese cuisine,  they are usually briefly stir fried with garlic until they wilt and served as a green vegetable – sometimes with oyster sauce.
       
      If you can find either the stems or leaves in your Asian market, I strongly recommend giving them a try.
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