Jump to content

MaeveH

participating member
  • Posts

    76
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by MaeveH

  1. Great suggestions, Carswell! La Gaudriole, according to their website, is open Monday nights, as is L'Entrepont and Brunoise. Looks like Mtl restos are beginning to feel sorry for hungry folks all week long... Oh, I think you meant Au Pain Dore on Peel above Ste Catherine, not Sherbrooke? Just checking.
  2. Ah, thanks for confirming. Too bad. It's an odd area that waxes and wanes (but ble bon riz forever remains -- is that place actually any good? but I digress from the thread...)
  3. Hey Ademello, are you sure that Iranian joint is still open on St Laurent? I tried to keep an eye out for it when I whizzed by on my bike while doing the Main roundup, but didn't see it. Please let us know! I thought they were pretty great. Called Marche Rose, or something like that...
  4. Thanks for the further recs. We ended up at La Paryse, with pretty good results, and also ate out in Quebec City. I'll admit my eyes have been opened to the absolute need for high chairs, and just how few places have 'em (even those you'd think would). I would have loved to do Beijing and dim sum if the family had been here longer. I suspect the parents would have been a little weirded out, but maybe not. Saskatchewan has a Chinese resto in just about every small town (thanks to the railway workers needing something to do after they were no longer required for cheap labour). They were certainly game for anything, and looooved Jean Talon Market (and Schwartzs, and Portuguese tarts, and croissants, and...). I'm impressed that ice cream parlours lke Ripples and Bilboquet have tiny kiddie cones, too. Maple ice cream sure wires up the wee ones before bedtime, though. Maeve
  5. Thanks Carswell! I should have checked the backlog first. Some good recs there. Too bad spaghettata's changed, though, that would have been perfect.
  6. Help! My brother-in-law, his wife, and their two-year-old twins are coming from the prairies to visit. Though we'll be eating at home much of the time, we'd like to take them out somewhere kid compatible and typically montrealish (and possibly write about it). Any suggestions? I'm kinda stymied...
  7. I just had the pecan pie last night at Jolifou, too! Very good indeed with a tooth-sticking, dark caramel aspect to it. I suspect it would be difficult to duplicate at home (well, for the pie-challenged like me, anyway).
  8. You know, I've always preferred Fairmount (and I've always preferred poppyseed). I haven't done a direct comparison recently, but I'm glad to hear your opinion.
  9. I can't believe I've never had it! I'll have to go check it out. Thanks Carswell. Maeve
  10. I still really miss the big poppy seed rolls from St Laurent bakery, and have yet to find their equal. (I also sort of regret not having bought a poppy seed juicer from the Pecker brothers while it was around, even though I suspect I'd never use it...) That one up on Bernard near Park is pretty good, blanking on the name. They've got addictive little rugelach. I look forward to hearing what other people recommend.
  11. as far as I've learnt, sheep lungs are above board in Canada, but stomach isn't. I think lungs are illegal in Japan, too. not sure what the rhyme or reason is, if tripe is legal. Possibly no one thought to look into lungs? Why are they illegal in the US? Also, clotted cream is illegal in Quebec, despite all the raw milk cheese. I heard that this is because unpasteurized milk that's contaminated won't coagulate properly to make cheese, but since clotted cream doesn't have that de facto self-screening quality, it's banned. Pity.
  12. The place with the deep fried pork chops, right? I've only had their bubble tea. I am curious about them and have heard good things. I'm also tempted by the Lebanese place next to Bangkok. It must be a bit tough for them seeing the line ups at their neighbour's. I imagine they catch some overspill, though.
  13. Offal in hand, I'm all set for making it this weekend (despite reading this morning that scientists have now found BSE-linked prions in organ meat other than brain/spinal cord). I won't be writing up the feat for Hour (timing was too tight, unfortunately, to make the appropriate pre-Burns Day deadline, though I talk a bit about haggis in this week's column) but I may be on CBC radio early Sunday morning. So thanks for asking, Carswell, I'll let you know how it goes... Still have to settle on a recipe.
  14. I spoke too soon! Though the wimps at Maison du Roti said no self-respecting butcher would sell lungs (thus pressing my panic button), the good folks at Alim-Pot (St Dominique and Roy) had a whole bunch. I was told they're popular with the Haitian community to stew with rice, apparently. Maeve
  15. I'm venturing into the world of haggis making in honour of upcoming Robbie Burns Day. I know that sheep paunch is illegal in Quebec, but what about lights (lungs)? If anyone knows anywhere I can find such things, please chime in. thanks, Maeve
  16. Hee hee. Sorry to have been the source of brain racking for you, Carswell, so early in the year. PA stands for Park Ave, as in the supermarche PA that's originally located on du Parc north of St Joseph and expanded into downtown, taking over the old curling rink on Fort St. (was the oldest curling club in Canada, I believe) PA has been suppling Mile Enders for decades with good produce etc (for a while I heard tales of organic beef that was priced so low that people wouldn't buy it, suspicious of its authenticity. They had to jack the prices for it to move... It's also well known for the comely cashiers). I haven't been in the Fort location yet, but imagine it's had an impact on Faubourg. I get nervous thinking about where I'd go for great cheap Thai if the complex were to close.
  17. Wow, I'm surprised to hear about Plantation. Although since they're owned by the Warsaw folks, I always did wonder what might happen. Do you think it has to do with the new PA opening up? How are they doing?
  18. Possibly Alati Caserta could tell you, or San Marco. What I'd really love to have expert advice on is panforte. Any takers?
  19. Although I have crossed the picket line (once, and shamelessly gotten a friend who lives near the beaubien outlet to do so), I've tried to minimize it. I've been hunkering down into my cave-like crawl space to bring up bottles, implored visitors from Ontario to bring stuff, and even bought a grocery store wine (which I still haven't had the heart to crack open). I'm not really up on the grievances, but I've always found the SAQ guys to be at the very least helpful, and often brilliantly so. I hope this ends soon...
  20. Thanks! I'll look into these. although maybe I should hold off till I can get them a good fresh one... Hmmm.
  21. Hello, I'd like to get a present for someone who's keen on white truffle oil. Any recs on brands and where to get something like this? Or are there other truffly items to recommend? I'm interested in a range of prices, preferably not utterly exorbitant... Thanks! Maeve
  22. There should indeed be chestnuts. M "Marchand des Marrons" has been plying his nutty fares there for 3 years now, weekends only. Weekdays he can be found at Philips Square. His real name's Eric, and he's got Italian blood coursing through him. He tries his best to introduce roast chestnuts to the city, but I get the feeling he's a bit discouraged. Go support him when the time comes...
  23. What does the ceramic grater look like? I've seen the ones in Chinatown that go for a few bucks, and am trying to imagine a $20 one...
  24. Hello all, I wrote this for another egullet forum, but thought I'd add it to a general Peru thread, in case anyone was interested. this is from a two-week trip that my husband and I recently came back from: My husband and I ate well. Potatoes, of course, with the famed hauncaina sauce which is a mild, tangy cheese sauce. Every now and then we'd get toasted corn kernels for nibblies with drinks (pisco sours -- lime, pisco (a grape brandy), sugar syrup and frothy egg white -- or algarobinas -- no lime, carob syrup instead, for "damas" we were told). We tried llama and alpaca (slightly gamey) and guinea pig (fatty little beast, the meat is similar to rabbit). Quinoa is now our favourite grain (we had a quinoa "risotto", as well as thin porridge, and a stacked quinoa/roast veggie patty). In Lima we ate tons of ceviche, in places low and high. It tends to be served with bits of pale, fat kernelled corn, in a lightly spicy lime bath. We did have a great version at Costernera 700 (where politicos and novelists eat) that was gingery and soyed. There we also ate fabulous salt-baked chita (a largish white fish, possibly grunt), some mediocre chinese-inspired seafood dumplings, and baby octopus. My favourite discovery in Lima was a dish prepared with chunks of octopus and covered with a black olive and olive oil sauce (looked creamy purple). Mmmm. I'll definitely try to remake that at home. we went on a trek, in which we were fed like royalty by a couple of cooks working magic with two gas burners in a tent. Lamb stew, fresh lake trout with a ground cherry (type) sauce, sweet potato chips, different types of potatoes, fresh popcorn for tea time, mulled wine... Great soups, involving lots of vegetables. Often the meat we had would be covered in a sauce consisting of lots of pureed veggies (achieved by pushing through seive), which we were assured was "typical". coffee was almost always Nescafe. Had some splendid jams (particularly a papaya-pineapple one, spiced with clove) and lovely fresh juice (papaya, strawberry, pineapple, orange). There was an odd fruit called lucuma, which on my last day there I realized I hadn't yet tried, so I ate lucuma ice cream, and a lucuma fruit I picked up a grocery store. It's an odd thing, with kind of a dry zucchini texture, like foam. I unfortunately can't think of it without feeling a bit queasy, as something that very last fruity meal made me sick. Drag, although if I'm going to get the stomach wobblies, the timing was good.
  25. Hello All! First off: Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrggggggh! Sigh. We missed our original flight to Atlanta, so by the time we got rerouted there it was too late in the day to go and explore all the wonderful possibilities that you had all so helpfully mentioned. But I will go there soon! All your suggestions made me think that your fair city would be a fun place for a short trip. So I will definitely make my way there and eat heartily. But, in lieu of lipsmaking tales of my Atlanta meal, I offer tales of Peru (which I was going to anyway). My husband and I ate well. Potatoes, of course, with the famed hauncaina sauce which is a mild, tangy cheese sauce. Every now and then we'd get toasted corn kernels for nibblies with drinks (pisco sours -- lime, pisco (a grape brandy), sugar syrup and frothy egg white -- or algarobinas -- no lime, carob syrup instead, for "damas" we were told). We tried llama and alpaca (slightly gamey) and guinea pig (fatty little beast, the meat is similar to rabbit). Quinoa is now our favourite grain (we had a quinoa "risotto", as well as thin porridge, and a stacked quinoa/roast veggie patty). In Lima we ate tons of ceviche, in places low and high. It tends to be served with bits of pale, fat kernelled corn, in a lightly spicy lime bath. We did have a great version at Costernera 700 (where politicos and novelists eat) that was gingery and soyed. There we also ate fabulous salt-baked chita (a largish white fish, possibly grunt), some mediocre chinese-inspired seafood dumplings, and baby octopus. My favourite discovery in Lima was a dish prepared with chunks of octopus and covered with a black olive and olive oil sauce (looked creamy purple). Mmmm. I'll definitely try to remake that at home. we went on a trek, in which we were fed like royalty by a couple of cooks working magic with two gas burners in a tent. Lamb stew, fresh lake trout with a ground cherry (type) sauce, sweet potato chips, different types of potatoes, fresh popcorn for tea time, mulled wine... Great soups, involving lots of vegetables. Often the meat we had would be covered in a sauce consisting of lots of pureed veggies (achieved by pushing through seive), which we were assured was "typical". coffee was almost always Nescafe. Had some splendid jams (particularly a papaya-pineapple one, spiced with clove) and lovely fresh juice (papaya, strawberry, pineapple, orange). There was an odd fruit called lucuma, which on my last day there I realized I hadn't yet tried, so I ate lucuma ice cream, and a lucuma fruit I picked up a grocery store. It's an odd thing, with kind of a dry zucchini texture, like foam. I unfortunately can't think of it without feeling a bit queasy, as something that very last fruity meal made me sick. Drag, although if I'm going to get the stomach wobblies, the timing was good. so that's the basics, and we feel most dorky for not getting to Atlanta... But soon, compadres, soon! Maeve
×
×
  • Create New...