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I was introduced to these by a local Himalayan restaurant. They only offer the beef version, sha momo. They offer it either steamed or deep-fried. Looking around on the Internet I see there are numerous variations such as chicken (chasha), vegetable (Tse), and spinach (tsoma).

At the local restaurant the seasoning for the beef momo seems to be minced onion, garlic, and a bit of soy sauce. Maybe salt and pepper. Anything I'm missing? Anyone familiar with making momo and its varieties?

-- Jason

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Acctually, the momo I usually get are round like a steamed bun and not cresent shaped like a pot sticker. Though I suppose shape may have little to do with it.

-- Jason

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I was introduced to these by a local Himalayan restaurant.  They only offer the beef version, sha momo.  They offer it either steamed or deep-fried.  Looking around on the Internet I see there are numerous variations such as chicken (chasha), vegetable (Tse), and spinach (tsoma).

At the local restaurant the seasoning for the beef momo seems to be minced onion, garlic, and a bit of soy sauce.  Maybe salt and pepper.  Anything I'm missing?  Anyone familiar with making momo and its varieties?

Momo's are just large dumplings, like the ones in the picture. They are a "Tibetan" food and the traditional version is with yak meat, though you won't find those kind in the US.

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Momo's are just large dumplings, like the ones in the picture.  They are a "Tibetan" food and the traditional version is with yak meat, though you won't find those kind in the US.

Not trying to nitpick but the Himalayan restaurant in St Paul, MN serves them stuffed with yak meat. I haven't had the yak version but it is on the menu (click). I'm curious where they source the meat.

Stephen Bunge

St Paul, MN

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Not trying to nitpick but the Himalayan restaurant in St Paul, MN serves them stuffed with yak meat.  I haven't had the yak version but it is on the menu (click).  I'm curious where they source the meat.

Thanks for that, I stand corrected. There is certainly very few Tibetan restaurants in this country, but where I'm at now, thereare 2 Tibetan restaurants (including one ran by the current Dalai Lama's brother), however neither serve yak. I assumed no place in the US would serve yak momos considering that most who return from Tibet complain about the yak meat and how unavoidable it is. I wonder how people at this restaurant enjoy the yak momos.

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I've never tried making them but here are 2 sources for recipes

Alford and Duguid's "Home Baking" book contains a recipe for them (meat version)

A tiny paperback by Betty Jung, "The Kopan Cookbook." (Subtitled "Vegetarian Recipes from A Tibetan Monastery") It contains recipes for potato as well as vegetable momos. The momo sauce is also in there. The book itself is a little hard to find but some of the recipes can be found online by searching for Kopan. Sorry, no help here on the meat version though.

jayne

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I was introduced to these by a local Himalayan restaurant.  They only offer the beef version, sha momo.  They offer it either steamed or deep-fried.  Looking around on the Internet I see there are numerous variations such as chicken (chasha), vegetable (Tse), and spinach (tsoma).

At the local restaurant the seasoning for the beef momo seems to be minced onion, garlic, and a bit of soy sauce.  Maybe salt and pepper.  Anything I'm missing?  Anyone familiar with making momo and its varieties?

Momo's are just large dumplings, like the ones in the picture. They are a "Tibetan" food and the traditional version is with yak meat, though you won't find those kind in the US.

If you are interested, yak meat is avalable here.

Edited by Vince (log)
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