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Nicolai

Nicolai

Shakshuka has indeed many variants and the addition of a particular spice, herb or ingredient adapts the flavour to the taste of the country.

 

The Tahineh recipe you are mentioning is our go-to recipe to dress fish (fried - grilled - bbq - hot - cold)  As such, our taste buds are Pavlov associated with Tahineh and fish. I guess you have such Pavlov reaction to other spices or ingredients as well. We call this recipe Tarator.

The short of it is that I am very reluctant to change the taste structure of Shakshuka.

 

As for Caraway which we call Karawya, It is mainly a spice used for sweets in the Levant originally and all over the area as of late.

Using Caraway in casseroles is not common in our area and is more of an Eastern Europe kind of food.

 

The main sweet with Karawya is called Meghli while it is called Karawya in Jordan and Palestine.

It is a pudding type of sweet laden with nuts and delectable. Meghli is associated with a new birth. Each family getting a baby will prepare Meghli for all well-wishers and distribute to family and friends.

 

A lesser known sweet is an Aleppo type of sweet which is sinking to oblivion. It combines several spices and has a olfactory hallucinating effect when fresh from the oven. It is simply irresistible. The recipe cannot be found on the net or in books. Yupps, it is one of those to remain nameless :B

Nicolai

Nicolai

Shakshuka has indeed many variants and the addition of a particular spice, herb or ingredient adapts the flavour to the taste of the country.

 

The Tahineh recipe you are mentioning is our go-to recipe to dress fish (fried - grilled - bbq - hot - cold)  As such, our taste buds are Pavlov associated with Tahineh and fish. I guess you have such Pavlov reaction to other spices or ingredients as well.

The short of it is that I am very reluctant to change the taste structure of Shakshuka.

 

As for Caraway which we call Karawya, It is mainly a spice used for sweets in the Levant originally and all over the area as of late.

Using Caraway in casseroles is not common in our area and is more of an Eastern Europe kind of food.

 

The main sweet with Karawya is called Meghli while it is called Karawya in Jordan and Palestine.

It is a pudding type of sweet laden with nuts and delectable. Meghli is associated with a new birth. Each family getting a baby will prepare Meghli for all well-wishers and distribute to family and friends.

 

A lesser known sweet is an Aleppo type of sweet which is sinking to oblivion. It combines several spices and has a olfactory hallucinating effect when fresh from the oven. It is simply irresistible. The recipe cannot be found on the net or in books. Yupps, it is one of those to remain nameless :B

Nicolai

Nicolai

Shakshuka has indeed many variants and the addition of a particular spice, herb or ingredient adapts the flavour to the taste of the country.

 

The Tahineh recipe you are mentioning is our go-to recipe to dress fish (fried - grilled - bbq - hot - cold)  As such, our taste buds are Pavlov associated with Tahineh and fish. I guess you have such Pavlov reaction to other spices or ingredients as well.

The short of it is that I am very reluctant to change the taste structure of Shakshuka.

 

As for Caraway which we call Karawya, It is mainly a spice used for sweets in the Levant originally and all over the area as of late.

Using Caraway in casseroles is not common in our area and is more of an Eastern Europe kind of food.

 

The main sweet with Karawya is called Meghli while it is called Karawya in Jordan and Palestine.

It is a pudding type of sweet laden with nuts and delectable. Meghli is associated with a new birth. Each family getting a baby will prepare Meghli for all well-wishers and distribute to family and friends.

 

A lesser known sweet is an Aleppo type of sweet which is falling to oblivion. It combines several spices and has a olfactory hallucinating effect when fresh from the oven. It is simply irresistible. The recipe cannot be found on the net or in books. Yupps, it is one of those to remain nameless :B

Nicolai

Nicolai

Shakshuka has indeed many variants and the addition of a particular spice, herb or ingredient adapts the flavour to the taste of the country.

 

The Tahineh recipe you are mentioning is our go-to recipe to dress fish (fried - grilled - bbq - hot -cold)  As such, our taste buds are Pavlov associated with Tahineh and fish. I guess you have such Pavlov reaction to other spices or ingredients as well.

The short of it is that I am very reluctant to change the taste structure of Shakshuka.

 

As for Caraway which we call Karawya, It is mainly a spice used for sweets in the Levant originally and all over the area as of late.

Using Caraway in casseroles is not common in our area and is more of an Eastern Europe kind of food.

 

The main sweet with Karawya is called Meghli while it is called Karawya in Jordan and Palestine.

It is a pudding type of sweet laden with nuts and delectable. Meghli is associated with a new birth. Each family getting a baby will prepare Meghli for all well-wishers and distribute to family and friends.

 

A lesser known sweet is an Aleppo type of sweet which is falling to oblivion. It combines several spices and has a olfactory hallucinating effect when fresh from the oven. It is simply irresistible. The recipe cannot be found on the net or in books. Yupps, it is one of those to remain nameless :B

Nicolai

Nicolai

Shakshuka has indeed many variants and the addition of a particular spice, herb or ingredient adapts the flavour to the country taste.

 

The Tahineh recipe you are mentioning is our go-to recipe to dress fish (fried - grilled - bbq - hot -cold)  As such, our taste buds are Pavlov associated with Tahineh and fish. I guess you have such Pavlov reaction to other spices or ingredients as well.

The short of it is that I am very reluctant to change the taste structure of Shakshuka.

 

As for Caraway which we call Karawya, It is mainly a spice used for sweets in the Levant originally and all over the area as of late.

Using Caraway in casseroles is not common in our area and is more of an Eastern Europe kind of food.

 

The main sweet with Karawya is called Meghli while it is called Karawya in Jordan and Palestine.

It is a pudding type of sweet laden with nuts and delectable. Meghli is associated with a new birth. Each family getting a baby will prepare Meghli for all well-wishers and distribute to family and friends.

 

A lesser known sweet is an Aleppo type of sweet which is falling to oblivion. It combines several spices and has a olfactory hallucinating effect when fresh from the oven. It is simply irresistible. The recipe cannot be found on the net or in books. Yupps, it is one of those to remain nameless :B

Nicolai

Nicolai

Shakshuka has indeed many variants and the addition of a particular spice, herb or ingredient adapts the taste to the country flavours.

 

The Tahineh recipe you are mentioning is our go-to recipe to dress fish (fried - grilled - bbq - hot -cold)  As such, our taste buds are Pavlov associated with Tahineh and fish. I guess you have such Pavlov reaction to other spices or ingredients as well.

The short of it is that I am very reluctant to change the taste structure of Shakshuka.

 

As for Caraway which we call Karawya, It is mainly a spice used for sweets in the Levant originally and all over the area as of late.

Using Caraway in casseroles is not common in our area and is more of an Eastern Europe kind of food.

 

The main sweet with Karawya is called Meghli while it is called Karawya in Jordan and Palestine.

It is a pudding type of sweet laden with nuts and delectable. Meghli is associated with a new birth. Each family getting a baby will prepare Meghli for all well-wishers and distribute to family and friends.

 

A lesser known sweet is an Aleppo type of sweet which is falling to oblivion. It combines several spices and has a olfactory hallucinating effect when fresh from the oven. It is simply irresistible. The recipe cannot be found on the net or in books. Yupps, it is one of those to remain nameless :B

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