• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Chris Amirault

Felafel/Falafel--Cook-Off 30

92 posts in this topic

Welcome to the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off! Click here for the Cook-Off index.

This cook-off focuses on felafel. I've enjoyed fine felafel here in the US and overseas, but I have literally no idea how to make this, the national street food of at least a handful of Middle Eastern countries. Several people who have recommended this cook-off did so because, while they felt they had some clues, they didn't really have a consistently successful recipe or method. Sounds like a good cook-off topic, eh?

There are a few topics on the felafel matter, including this one on tips and tricks, an older topic that finds more woes than techniques, and this preparation topic, How Do You Like Your Falafel? I also found this recipe by Joan Nathan, which seems like it might be useful.

But what do I know? Not much, I'll tell you. Time to chime in, you!


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a big fan of this falafel recipe. It's dead easy to make, and you can freeze extra patties for a fast supper.


Cutting the lemon/the knife/leaves a little cathedral:/alcoves unguessed by the eye/that open acidulous glass/to the light; topazes/riding the droplets,/altars,/aromatic facades. - Ode to a Lemon, Pablo Neruda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Falafel is the reason I finally broke down and bought a Cuisinart since it is a pain and a half to make with a standard blender--or without a really good mortar and pestle and the arm muscles of Angela Bassett. There is nothing like warm, fresh home-made falafel!

I like Madhur Jaffrey's recipe in her early vegetarian cookbook on Eastern/Asian food, though I'd enjoy hearing from Middle-Eastern members or sources.

Less than authentic: fine when prepared in cast-iron skillet, not deep-fried. Excellent with red onion, hot sauce, a cucumber-yogurt sauce and cornichons.

In this case, you HAVE TO SOAK THE BEANS!!!! :raz:


"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't made falafel from scratch in many years. I'm up for the challenge.

What's the preference - soaking dried chickpeas or using canned? Obviously canned is easier (less planning involved) - but does it make a noticeable difference with the flavour?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What's the preference - soaking dried chickpeas or using canned? Obviously canned is easier (less planning involved) - but does it make a noticeable difference with the flavour?

I make falafel from raw, soaked beans. They're ground fine without cooking. Texture's important. Canned wouldn't work--at least in my recipe or ones based on the same methods.


Edited by Pontormo (log)

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think raw, soaked would be better - but I've read that some people use canned. I'm still interested in hearing if anybody used them.

I need to go pick the brain of the owner of the Falafel Place down the street from me . . . his falafel are amazing. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i was thinking only yesterday how much i was craving falafel. one of the few things i will fry and say who cares. and with fresh baked pita... great cook-off idea. :biggrin:


Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is exciting--I love making felafel but I've yet to find a recipe that works for me. My patties are always sticky and they very nearly fall apart on me. The flavor is great, I've got the seasonings exactly how I want them, but I'd like to work on getting a nice crisp exterior.

Pam, I have been using canned chickpeas and maybe this is my problem. I'll have to get dried beans and try it as Pontormo suggests.

Does anyone use a mix of beans, or just the chickpeas?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've tried several times to make good falafel. Even bought a falafel ejector tool from the Holyland Deli.

Tried making them from the following:

1. Canned Garbanzos - fell apart in deep fryer

2. Canned Garbanzos and Canned Fava beans - fell apart in the deep fryer

3. Middle Eastern mixes (2 different ones) - dry, didn' t fall apart but didn't taste very good either

4. Dried ones that I ground in a Vita-mix, then soaked. They were passing fair.

5. Dried whole ones that I soaked - didn't soak them long enough! One would have thought 12 hours would have been long enough!

6. Dried whole ones with boiling water poured over them, soaked overnight. Added a little baking soda like my Lebanese cook friend suggested. Had lots of garbanzo skins rise to the top.

Just haven't ever been able to get the kind of taste from those served at the Holyland in Minneapolis. Crunchy on the outside, greenish in the middle, moist but not soggy. Taste outstanding!

doc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pam, I have been using canned chickpeas and maybe this is my problem.  I'll have to get dried beans and try it as Pontormo suggests.

I've tried a recipe using canned chickpeas, which used flour to make them solid enough to fry, which made sticky and chewy felafels. Use dried, soaked, uncooked chickpeas and you get a nice texture that holds together when you fry.


Cutting the lemon/the knife/leaves a little cathedral:/alcoves unguessed by the eye/that open acidulous glass/to the light; topazes/riding the droplets,/altars,/aromatic facades. - Ode to a Lemon, Pablo Neruda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dried soaked it is. But it looks like I can't attempt this until next week. Will get all the necessary parts purchased and ready to go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A word of caution on using canned ingredients and flour: the falafel can explode. Literally.

If you prepare a mixture that contains a great deal of moisture and then attempt to get it to hold together in the oil with flour, what will end up happening is the outer portions in contact with the oil will form a hard shell around the still-moist and very loosely bound interior. As the temperature of this interior continues to rise, the moisture will desperately want to get out of there, and you've basically got giant popcorn kernels sitting in a pot full of dangerously hot oil. I've seen the uncooked centers shoot up to three feet in the air of their own accord, leaving their charred, hollow husks behind. If one of these hit you in the face, you'd be in serious shape, and even if they don't explode, the results are still gummy and disgusting.

Always, always, always use soaked dried chickpeas and fava beans, and regardless of what the recipe says, don't put a whole onion in all at once. Add it bit by bit and back off once the mixture starts getting so moist that it drips when you squeeze a handful of it tightly.

It's also important to use olive oil for the frying. Peanut oil or your average bottle of Wesson will technically work, but the flavor just won't be there. The oil should be just deep enough to cover about 3/4 of each little lump, and I personally prefer to stick to small batches of 3-4 at a time to avoid greasy product. If you've got a giant fryer with a great thermostat on it, by all means, push the envelope.

I have had extremely good luck with the following recipe, though the quantities of the seasonings are not set in stone and may be adjusted up or down to taste. I honestly don't even measure most of them myself.

1 cup dried fava beans (soaked)

3/4 cup dried chickpeas (soaked)

1 white onion

1/3 cup minced parsley

2 tbsps cilantro

3 garlic cloves

1 tsp baking powder

2 tsp salt

2 tsp hot Hungarian paprika

1 tsp ground cumin


Edited by nduran (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the tip on soaked dried uncooked chickpeas.

Anyone had luck baking rather than frying the felafels?

TIA

Milagai

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here is my recipe for Falafel from the class I wrote about Lebanese cooking for eGCI. I use it everytime and the results are always great. I think the key is the proper ratio of chickpeas to dried fava beans.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used the recipe quoted by Boaziko (who says it is GC++ recipe from the Middle East forum) in the "tricks" thread quoted up top

"My recipe of Falafel is from the time I worked at the Dorchester Hotel in London.

The Egyptian chef in charge of all Oriental cuisine (apart from the Chinese off course) gave it to me.

I found it very good:

½ Kilo (1 pound) Dried Chickpeas

1 White Onion

½ Kilo (1 pound) Leeks

Half of the volume of the leeks – cilantro or coriander leaves

6 Tbsp Coriander seeds (Don’t mix them with white pepper corns)

2 Tbsp Ground Cumin

Sesames seeds

Salt

1) Soak the chickpeas for two nights in water, changing the water twice a day.

2) Chop the onion, leeks and coriander leaves.

3) Grind all ingredients; if too dry add some water.

4) Heat the oil up to 180C (= 356F)

5) Before frying roll the Falafel balls in sesames seeds"

I used 1 tab salt (1 tsp of that went on the finely chopped coriander leaves and stems, which I squeezed before adding to the mix).

This reecipe has no garlic, so please feel free to add it.

Ended up using roughly the amount of onion/coriander given: by weight, 1 part dried chickpeas to 1 scant part total vegetables.

I soaked the chickpeas for about 40 hours I guess. Ground them fairly coarsely, but a finer grind, nearer a "sandy" texture, might have been better - I wasn't sure the beans were really cooked after frying.

The recipe made at least 80 walnut-sized felafel, using a 15ml measuring spoon. They need to be fried till richly brown to cook the beans throughout. The mixture sheds moisture, so there is little advantage in forming all the balls ahead of time - they were easier to handle when I formed 6 as the first 6 were frying (in a wok).

I tried rolling them in sesame seeds, and also without sesame, but there was no big difference - the unrolled balls were no more fragile - and the mixture shed most of the seeds while frying. But I had heaps of cheap sesame seeds, so the visual advantage was worth it.

I tried adding a little flour, but the mixture is extremely sensitive to the addition of flour - you can immediately detect the doughier, pastier texture if you eat a bean-only felafel and then one with flour. The felafel with flour take longer to brown, although they were easier to handle. The bean-only felafel are best slid gently into the oil with a mesh skimmer. For 500g dried beans, I wouldn't add more than 1 or at most 2 tablespoons of flour.

Egg: you could add 1 egg to the total mix made from 500g dried beans. Again, the texture became marginally more doughnut-like, but the egg also added flavor. Although the mix was wetter, it was more robust, and could be dropped into the oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anyone had luck baking rather than frying the felafels?

Well I'm sure you could bake them if you really wanted to, but you'll never get the crunch they're meant to have that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here is my recipe for Falafel from the class I wrote about Lebanese cooking for eGCI. I use it everytime and the results are always great. I think the key is the proper ratio of chickpeas to dried fava beans.

Elie: I'm curious about the fact that when falafel gained more wide-spread appeal among those of us without Middle-Eastern roots, the vegetarian cookbooks that helped popularize it always list chickpeas/garbanzo beans without ever referring to fava beans. At least, that's what I recall. Yet I see your recipe actually has a 3:1 ratio of dried fava beans to dried chickpeas.

Would you--or anyone else--happen to know if falalfel recipes differ largely due to regional origins? Were fava beans excluded from vegetarian recipes in American cookbooks of the 70s and 80s simply because they were not as widely available as chickpeas, or...?

* * *

I think I've seen falafel recipes calling for chickpea flour which I have in the freezer for other uses. Since I like the coarser texture of ground soaked beans, I've never tried using the flour instead.

* * *

Milagai: As I said above, you can use a heavy cast iron skillet instead of a deep fryer, heating it before you begin cooking. Woks also work, though your batches would have to be smaller; it's too time-consuming for feeding a crowd but perfect if you want to keep the mixture in the fridge for a week and fry a few up when the spirit moves.

Falafel turns out best when you are generous with the cooking oil, letting it form at least a thin layer that rises a bit up the sides of the pan for the sake of a crust.

I use the oven to reheat patties that were cooked earlier in the week.


"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love felafel. Felafel was, in fact, what propelled me into finding a local Middle Eastern market back in the 1980s when I was just a little cook, which of course turned out to be fortuitous beyond felafel.

Pontormo, I was just going to punt the question about ceci flour, which was what the proprietess of the aforementioned market put me onto when I asked her for felafel advice, highlightng the timesaving aspect. The ones I used to make acc. to her directions were not bad at all. Whole beans taste better, however.

I'd be interested in any info about the relative use of whole beans vs. bean flour in re felafel.


Priscilla


Writer, cook, & c.


● observing #TacoFriday since 2010 ● preoccupied with road trippin' ● always ISO of the next #truckgram


Twitter Instagram  Orange Coast Magazine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi All,

That is just great, the Falafel recipe my brother (GC) brought back from London made it to Chiba, Japan.

Keep 'em frying !

Do not forget to try anf find the freshest possible Tahina. (from Nablus is best!)

Boaziko

I used the recipe quoted by Boaziko (who says it is GC++ recipe from the Middle East forum) in the "tricks" thread quoted up top

"My recipe of Falafel is from the time I worked at the Dorchester Hotel in London.

The Egyptian chef in charge of all Oriental cuisine (apart from the Chinese off course) gave it to me.

I found it very good:

½ Kilo (1 pound) Dried Chickpeas

1 White Onion

½ Kilo (1 pound) Leeks

Half of the volume of the leeks – cilantro or coriander leaves

6 Tbsp Coriander seeds (Don’t mix them with white pepper corns)

2 Tbsp Ground Cumin

Sesames seeds

Salt

1) Soak the chickpeas for two nights in water, changing the water twice a day.

2) Chop the onion, leeks and coriander leaves.

3) Grind all ingredients; if too dry add some water.

4) Heat the oil up to 180C (= 356F)

5) Before frying roll the Falafel balls in sesames seeds"

I used 1 tab salt (1 tsp of that went on the finely chopped coriander leaves and stems, which I squeezed before adding to the mix).

This reecipe has no garlic, so please feel free to add it.

Ended up using roughly the amount of onion/coriander given: by weight, 1 part dried chickpeas to 1 scant part total vegetables.

I soaked the chickpeas for about 40 hours I guess. Ground them fairly coarsely, but a finer grind, nearer a "sandy" texture, might have been better - I wasn't sure the beans were really cooked after frying.

The recipe made at least 80 walnut-sized felafel, using a 15ml measuring spoon. They need to be fried till richly brown to cook the beans throughout. The mixture sheds moisture, so there is little advantage in forming all the balls ahead of time - they were easier to handle when I formed 6 as the first 6 were frying (in a wok).

I tried rolling them in sesame seeds, and also without sesame, but there was no big difference - the unrolled balls were no more fragile - and the mixture shed most of the seeds while frying. But I had heaps of cheap sesame seeds, so the visual advantage was worth it.

I tried adding a little flour, but the mixture is extremely sensitive to the addition of flour - you can immediately detect the doughier, pastier texture if you eat a bean-only felafel and then one with flour. The felafel with flour take longer to brown, although they were easier to handle. The bean-only felafel are best slid gently into the oil with a mesh skimmer. For 500g dried beans, I wouldn't add more than 1 or at most 2 tablespoons of flour.

Egg: you could add 1 egg to the total mix made from 500g dried beans. Again, the texture became marginally more doughnut-like, but the egg also added flavor. Although the mix was wetter, it was more robust, and could be dropped into the oil.


"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

http://foodha.blogli.co.il/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I understand, fava beans are the basis of Egyptian-style falafel, while chickpeas are the basis of, for example, Israeli-style falafel. Where do other countries fall on the bean divide, though?

One Algerian cafe here in Prague uses fava beans (I think, judging by the stacks of canned fava in the back room). Different than what I'm used to, but definitely the best in town. :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I ended up using the epicurious recipe that lexy linked above, except I halved it to serve two people.

I soaked the beans (in the fridge) for about 20 hours and ground them as finely as poss. in my f.p. I only used a little onion, garlic, parsley and cilantro, about 1/4 of what the original recipe called for, and left the spice amount virtually the same, mainly b/c I love cumin.

I let them dry for most of the afternoon, then formed them into patties right before frying in grapeseed oil.

These felafel were certainly better than my previous (kind-of pathetic) attempts. They fried up crisp on the outside and were nice and moist with plenty of cumin flavor on the inside. I don't have a camera else I would have taken pictures; they looked so nice and were not greasy at all.

I was happy with this method, but they certainly don't beat the best restaurant felafel I've had. Still, it's an improvement on what I had been doing. These'll do nicely when I get the craving again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
grapeseed oil

There's at least part of your problem. I've tried most every alternative and nothing tastes quite the same as olive oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_34671_2649_124065.jpg

gallery_34671_2649_49290.jpg

gallery_34671_2649_91165.jpg

I used nduran's recipe above, but added regular paprica, 2 cloves of garlic and 1 tbsp cumin. I used Rachel Perlow's recipe for the garlic sauce from recipeGullet. I fried in a mixture of olive oil and sunflower oil.

I was fortunate to have been given a falafel former a few years back by a student of mine, we got talking food while I was driving her home from the clinic and she figured out it was about the only toy I didn't already have in my kitchen. Haven't used it until now. If someone knows the proper technique I'd love to hear it. The first couple I made like little discs, but then I started kind of mounding the falafel mixture, those looked more like what I'm accustomed to seeing.

I few minutes warming a pita in the skillet, a bit of salad dressed with the garlic sauce and I was good to go.

The texture was perfect, they were cooked through and the flavour was fabulous. This recipe is a keeper.

Only downside - serious garlic breath right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Would you--or anyone else--happen to know if falalfel recipes differ largely due to regional origins?  Were fava beans excluded from vegetarian recipes in American cookbooks of the 70s and 80s simply because they were not as widely available as chickpeas, or...?

The Joan Nathan article linked to by Chris Amirault in the initial post gives some background on the fava bean vs. garbanzo bean preferences in felafel, including one bit of data I didn't know about before:

But favism, an inherited enzymatic deficiency occurring among some Jews--mainly those of Kurdish and Iraqi ancestry, many of whom came to Israel during the mid 1900s--proved potentially lethal, so all felafel makers in Israel ultimately stopped using fava beans, and chickpea felafel became an Israeli dish.

Repeating the link to that article (which also includes a recipe): clickie

If I find some time to do some felafel experiments, I will probably be one of the baked-not-fried guinea pigs. I'll have to finally break down and get myself a food processor, though. (Yep--I don't currently own a food processor. The Foodie Police are knocking at my door right now. :laugh: )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If someone knows the proper technique I'd love to hear it.  The first couple I made like little discs, but then I started kind of mounding the falafel mixture, those looked more like what I'm accustomed to seeing.

What I usually do is grab a small handful and toss it back and forth from palm to palm, squeezing ever-so-gently until I have a somewhat spherical little lump. I lay them out on a cutting board and then lower them into the oil gently with a large spatula. A few little hunks may set off on their own once they hit bottom, but they usually hold together pretty well.

Once they start browning fairly seriously I roll them around to cook their little green "heads", which I like to leave sticking out until they get up to temperature so as to provide an escape path for the steam. Also: watch your temperature. This isn't tempura, and I don't know what the smoking point of olive oil is, so use roughly the same amount of heat you would to fry an egg.

I find that they take much longer to brown up in the olive oil, but the taste is well worth it, and it's pretty easy to reclaim most of it for another go-round later in the week. I prefer to store the raw mix in the fridge/freezer to making them all at once and re-heating later.


Edited by nduran (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By David Ross
      Welcome back to our popular eGullet Cook-Off Series. Our last Cook-Off, Hash, took us into a heated discussion of the meat of the matter--should it be chopped, hashed, sliced, diced, or chunked.
      Click here, for our Hash discussion, and the answers to all of your questions about this beloved diner staple. The complete eG Cook-Off Index can be found here. Today we’re launching eGullet Cook-Off 59: Cured, Brined, Smoked and Salted Fish.
      Drying fish is a method of preservation that dates back to Ancient times, but more recently, (let’s say a mere 500 years ago or so), salt mining became a major industry in Europe and salt was a fast and economical way of preserving fish. Curing agents like nitrates were introduced in the 19th century, furthering the safety and taste of preserved fish.
      Where I live in the Pacific Northwest, Native Americans have been preserving fish and seafood for millennia. While we are best known for our ruby-red, oily-rich, smoked salmon, other species of fish found in the Pacific and in our streams are delicious when cured and smoked including Halibut, Sablefish and Idaho Rainbow Trout. And don’t think that you can’t smoke shellfish, alder-smoked Dungeness Crab is a wondrous Pacific Northwest delicacy that evokes memories of crab roasting over a driftwood fire on the beach.
      Another method of preserving fish is to bath the beauties in a brine—a combination of water, sugar, salt and spices that adds flavor and moisture to fish before it is dried or smoked. And speaking of smoked fish, you can do it in a small pan on top of the stove, in a cast iron drum, a barbecue pit, an old woodshed or a fancy digital smoker. The methods and flavors produced by smoking fish are endless.
      Old-fashioned ways of preserving fish, (while adequate at the time), aren't always the best method today. Today's technology provides us with the tools to create cured fish that is moist, succulent, tender and with a hint of smoke. The Modernist movement has certainly played a role in bringing this age-old craft into the 21st century, so for the avant-garde in the crowd, show us your creative wizardry for preserving fish the "modern" way.
      Cured, Brined, Smoked or Salted, the art of preserving fish opens us up to limitless possibilities that transcend the boundaries of cuisine and culture. So let’s sew-up the holes in our fishnets, scrub the barnacles off the rowboat and set out to sea in search of some delectable fish to cure, brine, smoke and salt.
    • By David Ross
      Welcome back to a time-honored, cherished eG tradition, the eG Cook-Off Series. Today were venturing into a new world for Cook-Off's. Member Kerry Beal came forward with a Cook-Off idea we just couldn't pass up--Pork Belly--and inspired a new idea for future Cook-Off's. Knowing we're a community of great culinary minds, we'll be inviting the Members to send us ideas for potential future Cook-Off's, (more information to come later). Take it away Kerry and let's raid the larder and start cookin.
    • By David Ross
      Fall is but a whisper of the recent past--at least it is where I live in the upper reaches of Eastern, Washington. We had our first fluff of snow a week ago and a reasonable November storm is predicted for this weekend with temperatures holding at a chilly 18 degrees at night.
      Along with the rumblings of cold winter weather and Holiday feasts, we turn our culinary musings to time-treasured, comfortable dishes. And so I invite you to join me in another kitchen adventure--the inimitable eG Cook-Off Series. In 2013, we've tackled the tricky cooking of Squid, Calamari and Octopus and we made delicious dishes out of the humble Summer Squash.
      (Click here http://forums.egulle...cook-off-index/ for the complete eG Cook-Off Index).
      But today we're shunning all manner of counting calories, salt or fat content--for what is rich in flavor is good for the soul my dear friends. Please join me in crafting, nuturing and savoring a dish of Confit.
    • By David Ross
      Hello friends and welcome back to a time-honored tradition--the popular eG Cook-Off Series. We're in the heat of summer right now and our gardens are literally blooming with all manner of peak of the season ripe fruits and succulent vegetables. And there's no better time of year to honor a vegetable that is often maligned as not being as colorful or trendy as the chi-chi breakfast radish or the multi-hued rainbow chard.

      In addition to not always being recognized for it's looks, every August and September it becomes the butt of jokes at State Fair competitions across the country. If you can get past the embarassment of seeing the poor devils dressed up and carved into silly, cartoon-like farm figures or pumped-up with organic steroids, you'll find a delicious, low-calorie vegetable packed with potassium and vitamin A. Yes friends, your dreams have come true for today we kick-off eG Cook-Off #62, "Summer Squash."
      (Click here http://forums.egulle...cook-off-index/ for the complete eG Cook-Off Index).

      According to the University of Illinois Extension Office, summer squash, (also known in some circles as Italian marrow), are tender, warm-season vegetables that can be grown anytime during the warm, frost-free season. Summer squash differs from fall and winter squash, (like pumpkins, acorn and butternut squash), because it is harvested before the outer rind hardens. Some of the most popular summer squash are the Green and Yellow Zucchini, Scallop, Patty Pan, Globe, Butter Blossom and Yellow Crookneck.

      My personal favorite summer squash is the versatile zucchini. Slow-cooked with sliced onion and ham hock, zucchini is perfectly comfortable nestled on a plate next to juicy, fried pork chops and creamy macaroni and cheese. But the chi-chi haute crowd isn't forgotten when it comes to zucchini, or, as the sniffy French call it, the "courgette." Tiny, spring courgette blossoms stuffed with herbs and ricotta cheese then dipped in tempura batter and gently fried are a delicacy found on Michelin-Star menus across the globe.

      Won't you please join me in crafting some delicious masterpieces that showcase the culinary possibilities of delicious summer squash.
    • By David Ross
      Welcome back to our reknowned eGullet Cook-Off Series. Our last Cook-Off, Bolognese Sauce, led to a spirited discussion over the intricacies of the beloved Italian meat sauce. Click here for the complete eG Cook-Off Index. Today we’re launching eGullet Cook-Off 58: Hash, the classic American diner dish.
      Yet what appears as a humble, one-name dish is anything but ordinary. The difficulty in defining “Hash” is exactly why we’ve chosen it for a Cook-Off—simple definitions don’t apply when one considers that Hash is a dish that transcends regional and international boundaries. The ingredients one chooses to put into their version of Hash are limitless--we aren’t just talking cold meat and leftover potatoes folks.
      I for one, always thought Hash came out of a can from our friends at Hormel Foods, (as in "Mary Kitchen" Corned Beef Hash). It looks like Alpo when you scoop it out of the can, but it sure fries up nice and crispy. After a few weeks of research in the kitchen, I’ve experienced a new appreciation for Hash.
      So start putting together the fixins for your Hash and let’s start cooking. Hash, it’s what’s for breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.