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Kion


Jason Perlow
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Kion (click for web site)

509 E 6th St, New York, NY

(212) 529-5200

Peruvian is a cuisine I am just starting to get acquainted with. Unlike many of the Spanish Speaking countries in South America, which share many of the same dishes with just regional variations, Peru seems to have a totally separate and unique food culture. But apparently, even taking this into consideration, there is the entire Asian aspect and sub-cuisine layered onto the Peruvian food landscape that we really don’t get much exposure to here in the US. Besides the indigenous ethnic groups in Peru, there is also the influence of the Japanese culture in Peru due to many years of immigration. While the Japanese are no longer such a large ethnic group in the country (a significant re-emigration to Japan occured in the early 1990’s) 80,000 Japanese still live in Peru and represent the 3rd largest population of Japanese living outside Japan (Brazil and the US ranks 1st and 2nd).

Kion, in Alphabet City, which opened less than a year ago, is a swanky bar and restaurant featuring Japanese/Peruvian fusion cuisine. It is among one of the most unique restaurant concepts in New York, with a groovy environment and fantastic food to match. If you’re looking for something different than the typical Sushi experience, Kion should be on your watch list. It could be said that Kion is similar to Nobu, in that it stylistically represents Japanese/Peruvian fusion (Nobu Matsuhisa worked in Peru for many years and his cuisine is influenced by it). However, unlike Nobu, it shows its Peruvian side more than it shows its Japanese side.

We didn't order any actual sushi rolls on this visit but we saw some going out to other tables and they looked great.

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The bar has some interesting liquors onhand, including a number of very good premium Rums.

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This may look like a girly-man drink, but it is actually a Pisco Sour, the national cocktail of Peru. Pisco is a type of brandy made in Peru.

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Perfectly Rare Skirt Steak, with Argentine Chimichurri Sauce.

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Spicy Mussels with Rocoto Pepper

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Traditional Peruvian Ceviche. Be sure to drink the juice, the Leche del Tigre (Milk of the Tiger)

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Chulpa, a type of seafood bisque. This had nice shrimps and crabmeat in it.

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Zapallitos Picante, Roasted Zucchini filled with shrimp, crabmeat and goat cheese

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Closeups of some of the other Ceviches as well as the crunchy oysters.

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Coco Tuna ceviche, in coconut milk, along with a Pepino Rollo, a cucumber stuffed with salmon, avocado and seared tuna in sesame Yuzu sauce.

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Toro Con Patta, Tuna belly tartare with avocado mousse, capers and lime juice.

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Causa, a traditional napoleon of of shrimp, crabmeat, ceviche, avocado and potato.

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Lomo de Cerdo, grilled pork loin chops with aji panca served on a bed of Carapulca (naturally freeze dried potato) with salsa criolla.

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Tramboyo, crispy whole fried fish.

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Sushi Rice

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Peruvian Roast Chicken

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Owner Mario Martinez and Chef Miguel Aguilar

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Dessert Sampler with Tempura Fruit and Chocolate Wontons.

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Steps heading into basement bar area

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Psychadelic tatami room

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You can learn Samba and the Tango here, but I’d advise against too many Piscos beforehand.

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Edited by Jason Perlow (log)

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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was it as good for you as it was for me, jay? hehehe! a great evening! glad to hear rachel is feeling better!...i would love to mention that the chicken was the most perfectly seasoned and cooked chicken i have ever tasted. and the pork loin (lomo) is something that i can't stop thinking about. i really love this place, and the price point is not bad.

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I want to try their sushi rolls the next time we go back. And maybe hang out in that wild tatami room downstairs.

The pork was excellent and I really like that freeze dried/reconstituted Carapulca stuff. Its like Incan space shuttle food. Its amazing that the native people had the knowledge to do that (thousands?) hundreds of years ago.

The chicken was one of the best examples of Pollo a La Braza I ever had. The seviches all were awesome but that Causa was a real eye opener. Chulpa soup was excellent as was the spicy zucchini appetizer and those rocoto pepper mussels. There wasn't anything that we tried that I didn't like.

Edited by Jason Perlow (log)

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I can't believe this place has completely eluded my radar screen. I just don't walk far enough east on some of the local side streets. That place looks really cool and the food is appealing. Thank you very much for the great photos and great report!

Does Kion have its own website? If not, anywhere else we can look at the menu online?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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The website has some really cool photography but its got an awfully loud soundtrack that you can't turn off as far as I can tell. Dont let this dissuade you from eating there though, the food is excellent.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I had wanted to try this place out a while ago, but it was desserted and, let's face it, it's not exactly the most well-designed space in the city. Makes me think of what someone would refer to as "Club New York" in a place like Topeka, Kansas.

I'm glad to find out that that food is much better than their sense of style. (Well, the presentation of the food did look awesome, and they weren't dressed too horribly.)

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I had wanted to try this place out a while ago, but it was desserted and, let's face it, it's not exactly the most well-designed space in the city. Makes me think of what someone would refer to as "Club New York" in a place like Topeka, Kansas.

I'm glad to find out that that food is much better than their sense of style. (Well, the presentation of the food did look awesome, and they weren't dressed too horribly.)

Well, the space was previously a place called "Industry".

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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