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Montreal in Gourmet


jamiemaw
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The March, 2006 issue of Gourmet magazine is a special issue dedicated to the cuisine, markets, restaurants, cheeses and boutique hotels of Montreal.

Lots (48) of local recipes too.

Calling Montreal 'North America's Most European City', the editors go into great detail. Lesley Chesterman leads the batting order with an article entitled 'The French Connection.'

I look forward to your thoughts. And although it looks pervasive to an outsider, is there anything else you might have added?

from the thinly veneered desk of:

Jamie Maw

Food Editor

Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com

Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

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European in which way and to what degree ...what exactly defines montreal as the european city in north america....i personnaly don t know. is it a few good boulangeries....a couple of authentic french bistro's...or the fact that we speak french ?

Edited by bigorre (log)
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European in which way and to what degree ...what exactly defines montreal as the european city in montreal....i personnaly don t know. is it a few good boulangeries....a couple of authentic french bistro's...or the fact that we speak french ?

All will be revealed when you part with your $4.99.

from the thinly veneered desk of:

Jamie Maw

Food Editor

Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com

Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

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Nice issue. Leslie's article was particularly enjoyable. I felt like an insider reading it as a lot of it is familiar from this site and subsequent personal experience.

I have not been to a North American city with a more European feel to it than Montreal. Perhaps the language has something to do with it, but I think it is more than that even if it is difficult to put a finger on what it is.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Perhaps the language has something to do with it, but I think it is more than that even if it is difficult to put a finger on what it is.

Of course the language has something to do with it! The majority of the residents of this North American metropolis have been speaking French nonstop for four hundred years or thereabouts.

Montreal also boasts architecture from the 17th century to the 20th, a population that has always considered a chic appearance and a good meal a right, not a privilege, and a certain "European" insularity.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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European in which way and to what degree ...what exactly defines montreal as the european city in montreal....i personnaly don t know. is it a few good boulangeries....a couple of authentic french bistro's...or the fact that we speak french ?

All will be revealed when you part with your $4.99.

i guess jamie has a commission on the sale of the magazine

why european? because of french speaking? this can be exotique for a tourist but has no impact on the local realities

there is more better french in nyc than here

anyway this is gourmet magazine so lets be serious

Edited by Vinfidel (log)
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Nice issue. Leslie's article was particularly enjoyable. I felt like an insider reading it as a lot of it is familiar from this site and subsequent personal experience.

I have not been to a North American city with a more European feel to it than Montreal. Perhaps the language has something to do with it, but I think it is more than that even if it is difficult to put a finger on what it is.

Then clearly you haven't been to Dog River, Saskatchewan, Doc. There, porridge-thick (chardonn--eh?!) accents grunt and collide in the muskeg zephyrs. The landscape is eerily reminiscent of the more chic precincts of the Russian Steppe.

Speaking of which, step inside the Ruby Diner to sample the daily specials, from stuffed goldeye or baked pickerel bechamel to chump of bison. But keep your fork, Duke, 'cuz there's pie - Saskatoonberry pie - à la mode! The parvenus of Paris should be so lucky, but need not apply.

And did I mention the women? Well, I love a woman in uniform, especially if she's packing heat and her cheekbones are so sharp you can hang your laundry off 'em.

Montreal, a great city. But Dog River is clearly the most European of all unincorporated North American jurisdictions and a blessing to us all!

from the thinly veneered desk of:

Jamie Maw

Food Editor

Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com

Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

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Nice issue. Leslie's article was particularly enjoyable. I felt like an insider reading it as a lot of it is familiar from this site and subsequent personal experience.

I have not been to a North American city with a more European feel to it than Montreal. Perhaps the language has something to do with it, but I think it is more than that even if it is difficult to put a finger on what it is.

Then clearly you haven't been to Dog River, Saskatchewan, Doc. There, porridge-thick (chardonn--eh?!) accents grunt and collide in the muskeg zephyrs. The landscape is eerily reminiscent of the more chic precincts of the Russian Steppe.

Speaking of which, step inside the Ruby Diner to sample the daily specials, from stuffed goldeye or baked pickerel bechamel to chump of bison. But keep your fork, Duke, 'cuz there's pie - Saskatoonberry pie - à la mode! The parvenus of Paris should be so lucky, but need not apply.

And did I mention the women? Well, I love a woman in uniform, especially if she's packing heat and her cheekbones are so sharp you can hang your laundry off 'em.

Montreal, a great city. But Dog River is clearly the most European of all unincorporated North American jurisdictions and a blessing to us all!

You are right, Jamie, I hadn't been there! But thanks to you I have now seen what I have been missing :raz:

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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You are right, Jamie, I hadn't been there! But thanks to you I have now seen what I have been missing :raz:

No worries whatsoever, Doc. Dog River is a veritable Champs-Elyse-eh of superior dining opportunites, all washed down with spirited coffee Canadianos!

from the thinly veneered desk of:

Jamie Maw

Food Editor

Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com

Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

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Vinfidel, we can't compare NY and Montreal.  There is everything more in NY.

I am not sure I agree with that. I am going to crib a number of positions that others on this thread have supported in the past. Where in New York can you find a bistro such as l'Express or many other Montreal establishments where the majority of customers speak French, where you can eat legal raw milk cheeses and local foie gras to your hearts content and do so from 12:30-14:30 if you want an eat and run lunch or do the same thing from 22:00-24:00 or any other of the time for that matter.

To quote editor in chief Ruth Reichl "This is Gourmet's sixth single city issue. Devoting ourselves to exploring Paris, Rome, San Francisco, New York and London was wonderful, but spending time in Montreal was perhaps most exciting of all."

Another editor said "This is not just a charming city with terrific food. And it's not just fun to be here. What's really great about Montreal is how much hope it gives you for the future. These people have really figured out how to live."

Don't forget this is a New York based staff.

You see more is not normally better. A food culture has to come from the people. The brilliant chefs, staff, entrepreneurs and other hard working personnel simply find a way to nurture, expand, reconfigure and facilitate the innate desires of those they serve.

Brilliant chefs creating incredibly expensive meals for the expense account crowd does not necessarily create a desirable food culture.

Get this issue. It makes for very interesting reading.

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I think Montreal has much to be proud of. I love visiting the city. It has a lot of character and style. I just don't get there often enough. This is a nice issue. I don't think anyone will learn much that hasn't already been covered here, but the issue provides a little additional validation.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I liked this issue. Didn't read anything that I didn't already know about from personal experience or other sources (including eG) but it's a nice showcase of the city. It's too bad that there were space considerations to adhere to but I only have three minor quibbles:

1. Unless my copy missed something, I didn't see a whole lot written up about Quebec's cheeses apart from the listing of three fromageries.

2. Ontario and BC in particular are home to some great wineries so why in the world is Mission Hill product making up half of the eight wines listed in that cozy menu?

3. Page 58. :wacko:

Okay, so that last one is a personal thing.

Anyway, back to Jamie's original question. The Big Croissant's is an international city with strong European roots and influences; it's a mix of the language, the local history, the architecture and being somehow intertwined in European geopolitics at some point or another since Cartier made it down the St. Lawrence. I don't agree with Vinfidel in needing to do a 1:1 comparison to any other city because overall each city is different so it isn't a meaningful exercise. e.g. I can find better classic French in Tokyo but the city's an entirely different beast than Montreal.

Here's hoping that Gourmet decides to do a single-city issue on Canada's other international city: YVR.

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I really liked the issue as well. Have been there only once for a long weekend and reading about the places we visited and the places we missed makes me want to go back. As a longtime Gourmet subscriber, I think that their writers/editors shine brightly when bound by holding close to a theme throughout the issue and their 'city' issues are a good way to see that.

1. Unless my copy missed something, I didn't see a whole lot written up about Quebec's cheeses apart from the listing of three fromageries.

Knowing full-well that space is at a premium in a glossy magazine, I did actually notice this when going through the issue. One of the fantastic things for US fans of cheese is the lack of inane restrictions on raw-milk cheese. I spent a very enjoyable time at Hamel getting schooled in the range of Quebec's cheeses including very fine raw milk cheeses.

Stephen Bunge

St Paul, MN

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Why doesent any stores have this issue yet?????

where did u find yours

Chapters downtown (Stanley/Ste-Catherine) definitely has copies, as it's where I bought mine. Most of the newsstands should have already received theirs, as the distribution for new magazines is usually done on Tuesdays.

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I read it yesterday and it was very nice. The only things that bothered me a bit was the presomtion that everybody was biligual in our fair city... They did not visit my Montréal :biggrin:

The other thing was that most article were written in a very anglo vision. All the authors cited in the piece are anglo , most music venues described are english. So while the magazine always says that Montréal is so French , all the culture described in it is english ! But this is just a small complain

visit my fondation: www.ptitslutins.org

I started a food blog : http://antoniodelaruepapineau.blogspot.com/

(in french)

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I understand , of course , and said that it was a little peeve of mine about the piece.

And I dont know how it would have been possible to do , but it just my feeling , and overall , the piece is exellent and if I would be a tourist , I would book a trip right away ! :biggrin:

visit my fondation: www.ptitslutins.org

I started a food blog : http://antoniodelaruepapineau.blogspot.com/

(in french)

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