Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Composed Salads--Cook-Off 12


Chris Amirault
 Share

Recommended Posts

Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.

For our twelfth Cook-Off, we're going to continue the cool food trend with composed salads. Ok, yes, another northern-hemisphere-centric cook-off: mea culpa. But even if you've been in the hazy, hot, and humid zone the last six or eight weeks, you surely can appreciate the pleasures of a good composed salad.

Which is... what exactly? Well, Dave the Cook found this definition from The New Food Lover's Companion on the FoodTV website:

A salad in which the ingredients are artfully arranged, rather than tossed together. The dressing for a composed salad is usually drizzled over the top of the ingredients. In French the term is known as salade composée.

That'll do for now -- but if you have a working definition of your own, please share!

Unfortunately and unusually, our eGulleteer forebears haven't done too much research on our behalf. Save for a few threads on Waldorf salad, potato salad, and the like, there aren't too many topics devoted to our composed salad days. Whither Cobb? Nicoise? And what about the composed salad traditions in Thailand, Russia, and elsewhere? What should one drink with them? How should one serve them?

Roll up your sleeves and get to steaming, whisking, chopping, and assembling!

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would a Caprese Salad count? I made one last week, and since my own tomatoes aren't ripe yet, I'm not going to make another one until they are, so a description will have to suffice (rather than a picture, I mean).

On a round plate arrange slices of fresh mozzarella, red ripe tomato and whole basil leaves, overlapping each other. Grind on some fresh black pepper and a sprinkling of sea or kosher salt. Then a generous drizzle of some really good olive oil, and finish with a light sprinkling of vinegar -- I've been using a Spanish Sherry vinegar lately and I vastly prefer it to run of the mill Balsamic (the blonde color is less distracting than dark Balsamic as well).

This was served with served with crostini. Nice thick slices of rustic bread, toasted until crunchy throughout (about 10 minutes at 325F), lightly rubbed with a cut clove of garlic and drizzled with more olive oil. What a fabulous lunch.

Compare this to the Caprese I observed being made at Umberto's Clam House on Arthur Avenue in the Bronx. Slices of a sad pink tomato were layered with the mozzarella -- such a shanda. No basil. No salt & pepper. A drizzle of olive oil of no particular consequence, more oil & vinegar at the table. Really, what is the point of this? Salad Caprese is only good when the tomatoes are ripe and in season. It should not be on any menu as a regular item, but only a seasonal speciality, IMO.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That should not happen on Arthur Avenue, Rachel. They are ruining their good name!

You are lucky to have tomatoes growing, though. Soon your own Caprese will be ready and delicious. . .

Last week I had some great arugula from the Farmers Market and a good skirt steak.

Tossed the arugula with a balsamic vinaigrette, rubbed some herbs and garlic onto the steak, and cut up some zucchini, yellow squash, and onions in slices about 1/3" thick and seasoned them with salt and freshly ground pepper.

Heated the griddle on the stove, brushed with more olive oil and grilled the veggies and steak.

All done, sliced the steak on the diagonal.

Arugula on plates, steak fanned out on top with juices left on the plate after slicing poured over it, veggies cuddling up next to it.

Served with a pleasant rosemary-olive oil bread gently heated in the oven.

Easy, quick. . .and yummy!

Edited by Carrot Top (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I had it last Monday, so a little late now. I also want to point out that I did not order the pitiful looking Caprese, I was alone and therefore sitting at the bar/counter area (not the drinks bar, more of a diner counter) and watched the salad guy make lots of caesars & more than one Caprese. It really looked like they wanted big round tomatoes with no regard for taste. Sad.

Carrot top - I made something similar with the arugula from my garden before Jason left on his business trip almost two weeks ago. (sniff) He's home tomorrow night, and the arugula plants are nice and full again, so I think something similar might be made over the weekend. Steak is great on top of arugula. Mmm.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mmm. And steak salads are really so pleasant for a casual meal in the summertime!

The steak that I had this time was truly so excellent to start off with that I wanted to keep the extra flavors on the simple side. . .but when I can't find a piece of meat with a distinguished flavor, I use a stronger dressing to top it.

The two dressings that I tend to use over and over are a very mustard-y vinaigrette with minced shallots, capers, and fresh thyme. . . and an oriental-style dressing similar to a mayonnaisse but thinner, made with a soy sauce-star anise-garlic reduction, flavored with sesame oil. . .scattered with fine-cut scallions to finish.

I wonder what other people out there might be using as dressings for their steak salads?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wonder what other people out there might be using as dressings for their steak salads?

Balsamic. I know some people seem to think balsamic is over, but I still like it. Balsamic, dijon, olive oil, fresh garlic, salt and pepper. I think steak needs a bold dressing.

I love this cookoff. I could eat a composed salad daily.... if somebody else washes the lettuce for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's one I just thought of putting together:

Tender escarole (not the tough old heavy stuff) leaves chopped fairly fine tossed with a bit of good olive oil, sherry vinegar, a touch of salt and a generous amount of fresh ground pepper. . .top with a claw from a fresh Maine lobster right smack dab in the center. . .(an extra one from the batch steamed for dinner last night bien sur :biggrin:) that will then be topped with a swath of fresh lemon mayonnaisse. For the counterpoint, steam some mussels in white wine and a splash of Pernod with a battuto of aromatics that would include onion, carrot, fennel, and flat-leaf parsley. . .steam then gently remove when finished, while allowing some juices and aromatics to remain nestled inside the shells. Mussels in shells to be arranged around lobster claw in slightly casual manner.

What do you think?

Any ideas for improvement?

I might try this when I get back from my weekend trip. . .

Edited by Carrot Top (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I rarely buy prepared salad dressing, but every so often get a hankering for Annie's Naturals Shitake and Sesame. It makes a great dressing for a steak salad.

On another note, we're planning on having sweet corn and BLT's for dinner tomorrow night, and how I'm starting to wonder about a composed BLT salad. Dressing ideas?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On another note, we're planning on having sweet corn and BLT's for dinner tomorrow night, and how I'm starting to wonder about a composed BLT salad.  Dressing ideas?

Sounds like a perfect meal. My first thought for a dressing was a spicy tomato vinaigrette. . .but then that might be too tomato-ey. Second thought was that something like a Green Goddess, but lighter in texture and sparked up with fresh cilantro and fresh mint might be interesting. . .

Of course the children would love Ranch, I bet. :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love composed salads. The last issue of Fine Cooking magazine had some great salad recipes that, although not composed, could be adapted. I made one with red pepper, carrots, and snow peas with a ginger garlic vinaigrette and topped it with grilled skirt steak (the first time) and sauteed shrimp (the second time). It was great both ways.

My favorite salad cookbook is Lettuce In Your Kitchen by Chris Schlesinger and John Willoughby -- yes, the grill guys. You have to love a salad book with a recipe for a "salad" topped with grilled pork ribs. Seriously, there are some really great ideas in the book. I hardly ever follow any of them exactly, but always find inspiration within the pages.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah, I love composed salads. They can look so lovely and abundant all spread out on a big platter!

Here's one I did a little while ago:

gallery_21505_358_24996.jpg

new potatoes, roast asparagus, serranoham, eggs, mint. Dressing was a thinned mustard mayo.

I'm going to think now about doing one for this cook-off, prefereably something I haven't done before.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On another note, we're planning on having sweet corn and BLT's for dinner tomorrow night, and how I'm starting to wonder about a composed BLT salad.  Dressing ideas?

For a BLT salad, I would just use mayonnaise. Homemade would be good, but you could take a good storebought mayo like Hellman's and just think it with a little milk and some of the juices from cutting the tomato. I put mayo on my BLT sandwiches so that's what makes the most sense to me. As for composition, I would use a nice crunchy lettuce, like romaine, torn or cut into large shred and dress it with the mayo. Top the lettuce with three sections: 1/3 diced tomato (if large tomato is used) or quartered cherry or grape tomato, 1/3 crumbled bacon, and 1/3 homemade croutons. Take picture, then toss the salad and eat, mmm.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm...when I was a student, I remember I had a big thing for composed salads. It seemed impossible to have a party without a greek salad edged with red peppers and was it radishes, and decked with feta cheese and olives.

I liked to make them on a huge shallow china platter which was originally part of a great-aunt's bedroom furniture - it originally held her china ewer and wash basin, both also popular items for large family meals in later times!

I'm going to experiment with this when I get back to NZ and get hold of some feta cheese again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm...when I was a student, I remember I had a big thing for composed salads. It seemed impossible to have a party without a greek salad edged with red peppers and was it radishes, and decked with feta cheese and olives.

I liked to make them on a huge shallow china platter which was originally part of a great-aunt's bedroom furniture - it originally held her china ewer and wash basin, both also popular items for large family meals in later times!

I'm going to experiment with this when I get back to NZ and get hold of some feta cheese again!

I've watched and envied every cook-off but have never had the time, space or money to participate in most. Finally one I can do.

Forgot to add that one of my favorites consists of:

Mixed greens (1/3 of an elongated plate)

Italian tuna in oil

white beans (or white and red)

French Lentils

Olives

Capers

Basil

Olive Oil and white wine vinegar applied sparesely

Yellow and Red Tomatoes

A thin wedge of pecorino jutting out from the white beans

All served atop a few stale rounds of baguette

In fact, this is probably what I'll make for the cook-off, assuming it fits the bill of a salad composé

Edited by CharityCase (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I misread the title of this cookoff as "Composted Salads"  :wacko: .

Ah, an early idea for Cook-Off XIII.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Instead of answering "yes" to every question concerning whether something is or is not a composed salad, I think that we can delve into the more philosophical aspects.

What elements make up a successful composed salad? What textural balances? What flavor nuances? What about color? arrangement? size?

Meanwhile,

I misread the title of this cookoff as "Composted Salads"  :wacko: .

Were you spying on the dinner I made Wednesday night? The viniagrette for the mesclun was referred to repeatedly as "Salty Dressing with Salt." :hmmm:

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah, I love composed salads.  They can look so lovely and abundant all spread out on a big platter!

Here's one I did a little while ago:

gallery_21505_358_24996.jpg

new potatoes, roast asparagus, serranoham, eggs, mint. Dressing was a thinned mustard mayo.

...

That looks so great Chufi! Thanks for the inspiration..

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Instead of answering "yes" to every question concerning whether something is or is not a composed salad, I think that we can delve into the more philosophical aspects.

What elements make up a successful composed salad? What textural balances? What flavor nuances? What about color? arrangement? size?

I'm looking forward to some of the answers regarding this. I first ran across the term "composed salad" maybe 7 years ago (and that particular salad's a winner at my house) but still don't really understand what makes it a composed salad or not. The working definition seems to mean that it's artistically arranged and not tossed - but I suspect that if I said a salad is first composed, then tossed I'd be missing the point.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A good variation on a Caprese salad is to include slices of watermelon and substitute a good creamy feta for the mozzarella.

peak performance is predicated on proper pan preparation...

-- A.B.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our sixth Cook-Off, we're going to be making pad thai. You've surely eaten this Thai restaurant staple dozens of times, marvelling at the sweet, sour, hot, and salty marriage on your plate. There are lots of variations of pad thai floating around the internet, including one by mamster at the eGCI Thai Cooking course. While there is one ingredient -- rice noodles -- that may be hard for some to find, most ingredients or substitutes are available at your local grocer. And, if you're new to Thai cooking, isn't now a good time to get your first bottle of fish sauce or block of tamarind?
      In addition to the course, here are a few threads to get us started:
      The excellent Thai cooking at home thread discusses pad thai in several spots.
      A brief thread on making pad thai, and one on vegetarian pad thai.
      For the adventurous, here is a thread on making fresh rice noodles.
      Finally, a few folks mention pad thai in the "Culinary Nemesis" thread. Fifi, snowangel, and Susan in FL all mention in the fried chicken thread that pad thai is also a culinary nemesis of theirs. So, in true cook-off style, hopefully we can all share some tips, insights, recipes, and photos of the results!
      I'll start by asking: does anyone know any good mail-order purveyors for folks who can't purchase rice noodles at their local Asian food store?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our thirteenth Cook-Off, we're making fresh and stuffed Italian pastas, including gnocchi. I would take a bit here and try to say some intelligent things about pasta in general, but I'm very happy to defer to my betters in the eGullet Society's Culinary Institute! Check out Adam Balic's Pasta around the Mediterranean course here, and click here for and the associated Q&A thread. In addition, Moby Pomerance has three eGCI courses: the first on stuffed pastas in general (Q&A here), and the other two on Tortelli, Ravioli & Cappelletti and Pansotti, Tortelloni and Raviolo.
      Of course, there are also lots of other related threads, including several on gnocchi like this one, this one, and this one; a few fresh pasta threads here, here and here; and a thread on pasta machines.
      So break out your Atlas hand-cranked machine (or, if you're like me, start to justify buying that KitchenAid mixer pasta attachment!), dice up a few heirloom tomatoes, and start cooking! No machine? Then you're on tap for gnocchi, my friend!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to eGullet Cook-Off XLIV! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      We've just devoted a Cook-Off to braised brisket, and we're turning again to moist, well-cooked proteins for our next adventure: ossobuco. You will see it spelled a number of different ways out there, but Marcella Hazan refers to it as one word in her definitive Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, so I'm going with that spelling. No reason to argue with Marcella, after all.
      Ossobuco is braised veal shank, named after the "bone with a hole" that used to be attached to the hind shank of a calf. (Let's all agree to stick to veal, and not have, say, halibut ossobuco. ) The classic Milanese version includes vegetables, tomatoes, wine, and broth, and is served with risotto alla milanese, perfumed with saffron, and with gremolada.
      Some of the versions out there are a bit wacky. In particular, The Silver Spoon Cookbook simmers the 2" thick shanks for 30 minutes atop the stove. Given that Hazan has 1 1/2" shanks in a 350F oven for two hours, I'm pretty sure the SSC is a waste of good veal. Indeed, I'd think that a much lower oven for longer would work wonders.
      There are more things to talk about here than just braising temps and times! For example, many other versions of ossobuco depart from the Milanese approach. In her out-of-print More Classic Italian Cooking, Hazan provides the recipe for Ossobuchi in Bianco, the white referring to a sauce lacking tomato. In The Fine Art of Italian Cooking, Giuliano Bugialli offers ossobuco Florentine style, with peas and pancetta, and Lynne Rossetto Kasper's Italian Country Table offers a home-style version with mushrooms, favas or snap peas, and more intense flavors such as anchovy, sage, and rosemary.
      We have one short discussion of ossobuco here, and an even shorter one on wine pairings here. Indeed, as is often the case with Italian food, the best discussion is the one shepherded by Kevin72, the Cooking and Cuisine of Lombardia, which muses on on the dish's origins and execution throughout.
      I'm wondering a few things myself. Some folks say that braised veal cannot be reheated, unlike other dishes that benefit from a night in the fridge. I'm also wondering what other sorts of sides -- polenta, say, or the Italian mashed potatoes that Hazan suggests for the ossobuchi in bianco -- would work and/or are traditional.
      So who wants to welcome the new year with some bones with holes?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our third Cook-Off, we've chosen Indian lamb curry. Yes, it's true: that's a huge category for a cook-off, and saying "Indian" is about as stupidly broad as saying "American." However, like gumbo, there are some basic elements to most of the many, many permutations of this dish, and several cook-off participants wanted to start cooking Indian at home with several options.
      So, instead of choosing a specific lamb curry, I thought that having a conversation about those different permutations (like the gumbo okra/roux discussion, say) would be interesting and fun. I also wanted to avoid too particular ingredients that some of our cook-off pals can't get in certain places.
      A few things that we can discuss, photograph, and share include:
      -- the spice mixture: If you've never toasted your own spices, then you have a world of aromatic wonder ahead. I'm sure many people can share their ingredients, ratios, and toasting tips for curry powders that will blow away the garbage in your grocery's "spice" aisle. We can also have the ground vs. whole debate, if there are takers!
      -- the paste: many curry dishes involve frying a blended paste of onion, garlic, and/or ginger, along with the spices, in oil or ghee (clarified butter). I found that learning how to cook that paste -- which requires the same sort of patience demanded by roux -- was the key to making a deep, rich curry.
      -- accompaniments: rice dishes or bread (I have a pretty good naan recipe that I'd be glad to try out again).
      Here are a couple of related eGullet threads:
      lamb kangari
      a lamb and goat thread
      If anyone finds more, post 'em!
      So: find yourself a leg of lamb to bone, sharpen your knives, and get ready to update your spice drawer!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to this second anniversary eGullet Recipe Cook-Off! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      A click on that index shows that, while the Cook-Offs have ventured throughout the globe, but they've never stopped in Africa. One could say we've passed through -- gumbo, for example, is widely acknowledged to have roots in Africa, among other places. So, for the first Cook-Off rooted in African cuisine, we'll be cooking up mafé, otherwise known as peanut or groundnut stew.
      Mafé is a traditional west African dish that can be found in the kitchens of Senegal and Mali. It's often served with a starch of some sort (rice, most often) to soak up the nutty stew juices, or, alternately, the starch is part of the stew itself, resulting in a drier braise. While there are a few mentions of mafé in eG Forums, there are no discussions of actually preparing it that I can find except this brief post by yours truly. There are a few recipes elsewhere, including this stew-like one and this more braise-y one, both of which are from the Food Network.
      Mafé is a forgiving cold-weather dish, and one that, like most stews, benefits from reheating (read: swell as leftovers). I'm convinced that mafé is one of the great one-pot dishes in global cuisine, built on a solid base of sautéed onions, peanut-thickened stock, and hearty meat. Like other classics such as gumbo, cassoulet, and bibimbap, it affords tremendous variation within those guides; it would be hard to find very many vegetables that haven't made an appearance in a mafé pot somewhere, and there are lots of possibilities concerning herbs and spices. (I like to increase the heat quite a bit with cayenne, which I think plays off the silk of the nut oil just perfectly, for example.)
      Finally, it's a pleasant surprise if you've never had a savory peanut dish before, and kids in particular tend to think it is the bee's knees. The kitchen fills with a heady aroma -- browned onion, ground peanuts -- that's hard to describe and resist.
      So: who's up for mafé?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...