Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cooking with "All About Braising" by Molly Stevens (Part 1)


Recommended Posts

Snowangel and I decided that with all the braising going on here and with the knowledge gained from Fat Guy's excellent eGCI Braising course, we should start a braise of the month. In this case we'll be using recipes from Molly Steven's excellent All about Braising book.

I'll kick this month's braise off with a short rib braise I did from her book last night.

Short Ribs in Porter Ale with Maple Rosemary infused Glaze

I picked up some nice meaty short ribs. Who knew though that "sliced short ribs" meant the bone had already been sliced away from the meat? What you see here is my clumsy attempt to tie them back together again. The recipe calls for them to be sprinkled with salt a day or two before. Since I forgot that part, I managed an hour before:

gallery_6080_825_39327.jpg

The ribs are browned, then the carrots and onion are added and browned. The recipe called for Porter Ale, and after Brooks filled me in on what that was, I had Don snag some from the LCBO for me.

gallery_6080_825_47229.jpg

I found the Le Crueset braisier perfect for short ribs application.

gallery_6080_825_47329.jpg

The ribs are braised in a combination of porter ale and beef stock. The recipe calls for 2 1/2 to 3 hours at 300, but I did mine for 4 hours at 225.

Once the ribs are done, remove them from the oven, transfer them to a flameproof dish and cover and keep them warm. Then remove the veggies and strain the liquid into a pot and reduce by about a half I guess.

Ribs just out of the oven.

gallery_6080_825_3102.jpg

Somewhere along the way, you've taken the maple syrup, heated it, and added a sprig of fresh rosemary. Cover and let it infuse for an hour or so.

When the liquid is reduced, take it off the heat. In the meantime, some squeezed prepared horseradish is added to the maple syrup and rosemary. Take the rosemary out and brush the ribs with the glaze. Pour the reduced liquid around the ribs and stick under the broiler until the ribs are carmelized.

Ribs out from the broiler.

gallery_6080_825_20791.jpg

You'd have thought the glaze would have been sweet, but with the rosemary infusion and the addition of the horseradish, it was not. I might be tempted to add a bit more horseradish next time though.

These were damn fine ribs, I have to say. So come on, braise along with us. If you don't have Molly's book, I strongly urge you to get it, because it's amazing.

Snowangel gets to pick the next recipe. :biggrin:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks and sounds fabulous Marlene. Now I wish you had posted this before I started on my port and wine braised short ribs this afternoon :wink:

In your opinion, how does it compare with wine braised short ribs?

Cheese: milk’s leap toward immortality – C.Fadiman

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lise,

Since this was my first ever short rib braise, I can't make a comparison yet, but you can bet that I'll be trying wine next.

I did do a pot roast not long ago in wine, and the one thing I noticed was the difference in smell. The pot roast just smelled more heavenly when it was braising!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to admit, the intoxicating aroma was indeed the first thing Dale commented on when when he came home after work.

However, you've made a good point, one I've never thought too much about before, and you're right, braising or stewing in beer, ale, etc. doesn't seem to perfume the house as much. I had Steak and Guinness stewing for a few hours this week and a carbonade flammande two weeks ago, and neither aromatized the house the way a wine based braise or stew does. That's not to say that beer braised foods are less flavourful because they certainly are, just that the aromas don't seem as intense. Very interesting.

Cheese: milk’s leap toward immortality – C.Fadiman

Link to post
Share on other sites
Snowangel gets to pick the next recipe. :biggrin:

I'm on for tomorrow. They had beautiful country-style ribs (bone-in) at the meat market today. I also have a mango. So, it's the pork with lime/mango and coconut tomorrow night. I will post more about after it's done.

I must admit that I have done three other braises from this book -- the pork in milk, brussels sprouts and chicken with prune and olives.

They have all been outstanding. Really wonderful.

At some point this week or next weekend, I want to do the leeks with bacon.

Oh, and I have a aide of wild salmon in the freezer and there is that salmon braised with bacon and mushrooms....

One of the great things about braising is that I can get everything into the oven before the kids get home, which leads to more time to help with homework.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to post
Share on other sites

And the hits keep coming.

Tonight was pork braised with mango, lime and coconut (milk). I didn't have any serrano chilis, so substituted a big bird.

This dish was really outstanding. I'll admit up front I didn't brown and braise in a skillet. I did it in my LC. Heck, that pot has to serve as more than just decoration. And, after the browning parts, I did it in the oven. I didn't have nearly as much evaporation as Molly suggested her technique would provide, but that was just fine with us.

The only warning I can give is that this dish does need a green garnish. Parsley would be OK, but I think green onion tops would be, well, tops! So, I didn't photo it. I didn't have a good green garnish. Best of all, everything I've needed for every recipe from this book is available, easily, at my local supermarket.

I can't say that I'll only do a braise a month from this book, at this time of year. Later this week, I expect it will be the braised salmon.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to post
Share on other sites

Lise, you should get the book. This thread is intended to relate experiences with Molly's book, but hell, all recipes are welcome!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

my book is on the way and the thread is killing me...i am very anxious to pariticipate with all senses! fedex, hurry, hurry!

edited for terrible typing

Edited by chezcherie (log)

"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

Link to post
Share on other sites

While this receipe calls for bone-in short ribs, I used this recipe for boneless short ribs for our SuperBowl party main dish. It worked out great. I used the Anchor Porter in part because Anchor is one of my favorite breweries to begin with.

Charles a food and wine addict - "Just as magic can be black or white, so can addictions be good, bad or neither. As long as a habit enslaves it makes the grade, it need not be sinful as well." - Victor Mollo

Link to post
Share on other sites
Lise, you should get the book.  This thread is intended to relate experiences with Molly's book, but hell, all recipes are welcome!

No problem, any excuse to get a new cookbook works with me :wink:

Cheese: milk’s leap toward immortality – C.Fadiman

Link to post
Share on other sites

Made Bisteces Rancheros tonight. Shoulder beefsteaks braised with tomatoes, potatoes and poblano peppers.

Some obeservations/suggestions:

use cazuela if possible;

white onions are perfect - pungent/sweet balanced although don't slice them too thin - negatively affects the presentation;

potatoes - although sliced thinner than suggested 1/8 inch they came out underdone - parboiling?

tomatoes - the idea of flattening is a smart one - a visual plus.

poblanos - for a perfect heat i suggest to double the amount.

Overall - should be added ti the list of highly recommended recipes in this book.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the report, helens. In lieu of a cazuela, what would you recommend?

I would have thought that the potatoes would have been cooked through. Probably parboil. Might be easier to briefly parboil them already sliced?

Edited to add: I did mark the recipe in my book to reflect your thoughts.

Edited by snowangel (log)
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to post
Share on other sites

On Saturday I made the "Pork Pot Roast with Apricots, Cardamom & Ginger" and we ate it re-heated last night. It was really delicious. I cut up the finished pork smaller than Molly suggests and served the dish as a stew or thick soup. The sauce was wiped up with some freshly baked bread. It really hit the spot with its hint of heat from the cayenne, the sweetness of the apricots, the tang of the orange - a definite keeper.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites

I made the braised cauliflower with capers and toasted bread crumbs. I enjoyed it very much. I made sure to brown the Cauliflower very well since I am used to roasted cauliflower.

I also made the Chicken Fricasee with artichokes and mushrooms (without the cream), it was also very good. I used chicken thighs and the chicken was melt in your mouth tender.

There was one section where she says to take out the sauteed onions and mushrooms and use brandy to deglaze. I found the onions and mushrooms had released enough liquid to deglaze the pan already. So I just added the liquid and reduced it with the mushrooms and onion in it. I was very pleased with the sauce it created.

I find that I get almost no evaporation using my Le Creuset 5 qt Braiser and dutch oven. So I just remove the meat and reduce on the stove. Or in the case of the Cauliflower, I just took the lid off like the instructions said.

I can't wait to do some of the other recipes.

Msk

Link to post
Share on other sites
On Saturday I made the "Pork Pot Roast with Apricots, Cardamom & Ginger" and we ate it re-heated last night.  It was really delicious.  I cut up the finished pork smaller than Molly suggests and served the dish as a stew or thick soup.  The sauce was wiped up with some freshly baked bread.  It really hit the spot with its hint of heat from the cayenne, the sweetness of the apricots, the tang of the orange - a definite keeper.

I had company the night I made the pork/mango dish and sent the leftovers home with my cousin (he loves leftovers) and prounced them even better when re-heated. I really need to either increase what I make, or quit inviting people over because I haven't had any leftovers myself :hmmm: .

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the report, helens.  In lieu of a cazuela, what would you recommend?

I would have thought that the potatoes would have been cooked through.  Probably parboil.  Might be easier to briefly parboil them already sliced?

Edited to add:  I did mark the recipe in my book to reflect your thoughts.

Susan, any baking or deep saute pan should be fine, i just happen to be mildly obsessed with claypot cooking especially during the winter.

I had these Bisteces Rancheros reheated for lunch, and have a radical suggestion of skipping potatoes altogether. They really don't bring much to the dish and sort of nasty tasting the next day after sitting in quite a sour tomato/vinegar sauce. Maybe just to boil them and smash with some butter and chopped parsley.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the hint on the potatos. They seemed a bit out of place in this dish, anyway. I'm not particularly fond of potatoes with tomato, anyway. Perhaps that's just me. Your comment duly noted in my book.

I don't have a claypot. And, I am somewhat confused about just what a claypot is (yes, I'm admitting my stupidity here). I do have a nice ceramic pot, but I don't think that's what a claypot is. I think mine is glazed inside and out.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to post
Share on other sites

Made the Goan Chicken tonight. Chicken thighs marinated overnight in mint/cilantro/ginger/garlic paste and braised in rum and chicken stock, finished with a splash of cream.

Once again i used a cazuela and braised the dish in oven and not stovetop eliminating the need of turning the pieces over and over, but allowing them to stay juicy while keeping this nice crust of the initial browning.

Also used a dark rum instead of amber as this is what i had. And finished with creme fraiche and not cream as the sauce needed a touch of sourness. The sauce was addictive.

Served over cazuela fried rice - a recipe from one of the first Wolfert's books where you brown raw rice in evoo until toasted and then cook it like a regular rice.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Susan, have you checked your local Marshalls recently?

My local ones carry quite a selection of different spanish/portuguese earthenware casseroles and cazuelas. They are glazed except for the bottom and stovetop safe.

I will do so. I will also be very near a large hispanic market later this week. Could I look there, as well? Am I looking for a particular shape? Will it have a lid?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to post
Share on other sites

Susan, to get the idea check the cookware section in The Spanish Table: Cazuelas and Cocote.

I have both types in couple of sizes but mostly use a 11 inch covered cazuela.

In fact tonight i used it for yet another dish from the book: braised cabbage. Added some double smoked bacon, fresh bay leaves and riesling instead of chicken stock. Very nice, especially sprinkled with coarse sea salt and red pepper flakes (my favorite marash).

I will probably be making country-style pork ribs adobado (sans chicken) tomorrow and then leave the book alone for some time :smile:

Link to post
Share on other sites

On the table tonight was the Salmon baised in Pinot Noir from Molly's book. I used two kinds of bacon -- regular bacon for the braise, and bacon ends for the sauce/garnish. This dish was outstanding. Salmon really stands up well to the other ingredients, which would indeed overwhelm a more delicate fish. This dish however, is somewhat ditzy. There is considerable prep and chopping, which I certainly don't mind, but since this dish braises for such a short time, the work is more concentrated!

I served it with pasta with ricotta and peas from the recent Bittman column in the NY times. This was the perfect starchy accompaniment. This particular dish is not highly seasoned, so it shown in it's simplicity and allowed the rich tastes of the salmon to come through.

Finally, a salad of buttercrunch, a perfect pear, some blue cheese, carmelized pecans.

I would have taken pictures had Peter not dumped almost a full gallon of milk on the floor as I was dishing up.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm late to the party, but we've been braising all sorts of things from AAB since we got the book a couple of months ago. In fact, I've made seven of the recipes.

World's Best Braised Cabbage

Not the world's best, because it doesn't contain pork, but very good.

Bistecces Rancheros

Agree with the comments about the potatoes, but otherwise I liked this very much; I'd never bought the thin-sliced chuck steaks before, never even had an idea what you'd do with them. Was this the one with lots of poblanos in it? That's how I remember it tasting.

Caribbean Pork Shoulder

I like almost anything with lime juice in it, and this was no exception. Actually I made the smaller variation at the end, without the skin. Too bad there.

Braised Endive with Prosciutto

This was the world's best braised endive, because of the pork. Daughter Iris is a little skeptical of vegetables, but she sure liked this.

Chicken with Cider and Parsnips

I used chicken thighs instead of breasts and cooked it twice as long. The chicken was nothing special, but the parsnips with the reduced cider were great. Iris loved this one, which reminded me of the little boy in the book French Impressions whose family doesn't realize that French cider is hard cider.

Braised Sausages with Grapes

A variation on the sausage and plum recipe, which I'll try during plum season. I've written about this dish before, so I was curious to try this recipe. The biggest difference is that the one I make doesn't contain wine; the sauce is pretty much just grapes. I liked the taste of the sauce better in this recipe -- it's not as sweet -- but it made the grapes stand out too much. Some nice tart plums might be just the thing, though.

I can't wait to braise a few more based on suggestions from this thread.

Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Similar Content

    • By Mutleyracers
      Hi all. I hope you are well. I am just into baking bread due to lockdown and need help. Ideally I would like modernist bread but the wife is not quite agreeing to that yet. So I would like some where to start for now until she comes around to the idea. After she has tasted all my amazing breads I make. 
       
      I would like this to be in metric rather than imperial.
       
      Thank you 
    • By Burmese Days
      Hello everyone,
       
      This is my first post, so please tell me if I've made any mistakes. I'd like to learn the ropes as soon as possible. 
       
      I first learned of this cookbook from The Mala Market, easily the best online source of high-quality Chinese ingredients in the west. In the About Us page, Taylor Holiday (the founder of Mala Market) talks about the cookbooks that inspired her.
      This piqued my interest and sent me down a long rabbit hole. I'm attempting to categorically share everything I've found about this book so far.
       
      Reading it online
      Early in my search, I found an online preview (Adobe Flash required). It shows you the first 29 pages. I've found people reference an online version you can pay for on the Chinese side of the internet. But to my skills, it's been unattainable.
       
      The Title
      Because this book was never sold in the west, the cover, and thus title, were never translated to English. Because of this, when you search for this book, it'll have several different names. These are just some versions I've found online - typos included.
      Sichuan (China) Cuisine in Both Chinese and English Si Chuan(China) Cuisinein (In English & Chinese) China Sichuan Cuisine (in Chinese and English) Chengdu China: Si Chuan Ke Xue Ji Shu Chu Ban She Si Chuan(China) Cuisinein (Chinese and English bilingual) 中国川菜:中英文标准对照版 For the sake of convenience, I'll be referring to the cookbook as Sichuan Cuisine from now on.

       
      Versions
      There are two versions of Sichuan Cuisine. The first came out in 2010 and the second in 2014. In an interview from Flavor & Fortune, a (now defunct) Chinese cooking
      magazine, the author clarifies the differences.
      That is all of the information I could find on the differences. Nothing besides that offhanded remark. The 2014 edition seems to be harder to source and, when available, more expensive.
       
      Author(s)

      In the last section, I mentioned an interview with the author. That was somewhat incorrect. There are two authors!
      Lu Yi (卢一) President of Sichuan Tourism College, Vice Chairman of Sichuan Nutrition Society, Chairman of Sichuan Food Fermentation Society, Chairman of Sichuan Leisure Sports Management Society Du Li (杜莉) Master of Arts, Professor of Sichuan Institute of Tourism, Director of Sichuan Cultural Development Research Center, Sichuan Humanities and Social Sciences Key Research Base, Sichuan Provincial Department of Education, and member of the International Food Culture Research Association of the World Chinese Culinary Federation Along with the principal authors, two famous chefs checked the English translations.
      Fuchsia Dunlop - of Land of Plenty fame Professor Shirley Cheng - of Hyde Park New York's Culinary Institute of America Fuchsia Dunlop was actually the first (and to my knowledge, only) Western graduate from the school that produced the book.
       

      Recipes
      Here are screenshots of the table of contents.  It has some recipes I'm a big fan of.
       
      ISBN
      ISBN 10: 7536469640   ISBN 13: 9787536469648 As far as I can tell, the first and second edition have the same ISBN #'s. I'm no librarian, so if anyone knows more about how ISBN #'s relate to re-releases and editions, feel free to chime in.
       
      Publisher
      Sichuan Science and Technology Press 四川科学技术出版社  
      Cover
      Okay... so this book has a lot of covers.
      The common cover A red cover A white cover A white version of the common cover An ornate and shiny cover  There may or may not be a "Box set." At first, I thought this was a difference in book editions, but that doesn't seem to be the case. As far as covers go, I'm at a loss. If anybody has more info, I'm all ears.
       
      Buying the book
      Alright, so I've hunted down many sites that used to sell it and a few who still have it in stock. Most of them are priced exorbitantly.
       
      AbeBooks.com ($160 + $15 shipping) Ebay.com - used ($140 + $4 shipping) PurpleCulture.net ($50 + $22 shipping) Amazon.com ($300 + $5 shipping + $19 tax) A few other sites in Chinese  
      I bought a copy off of PurpleCuture.net on April 14th. When I purchased Sichuan Cuisine, it said there was only one copy left. That seems to be a lie to create false urgency for the buyer. My order never updated past processing, but after emailing them, I was given a tracking code. It has since landed in America and is in customs. I'll try to update this thread when (if) it is delivered.
       
      Closing thoughts
      This book is probably not worth all the effort that I've put into finding it. But what is worth effort, is preserving knowledge. It turns my gut to think that this book will never be accessible to chefs that have a passion for learning real Sichuan food. As we get inundated with awful recipes from Simple and quick blogs, it becomes vital to keep these authentic sources available. As the internet chugs along, more and more recipes like these will be lost. 
       
      You'd expect the internet to keep information alive, but in many ways, it does the opposite. In societies search for quick and easy recipes, a type of evolutionary pressure is forming. It's a pressure that mutates recipes to simpler and simpler versions of themselves. They warp and change under consumer pressure till they're a bastardized copy of the original that anyone can cook in 15 minutes. The worse part is that these new, worse recipes wear the same name as the original recipe. Before long, it becomes harder to find the original recipe than the new one. 
       
      In this sense, the internet hides information. 
       
    • By TexasMBA02
      After batting about .500 with my previous approach to macarons, I came across Pierre Herme's base recipe online.  After two flawless batches of macarons, I've been re-energized to continue to work at mastering them.  Specifically, I want to try more of his recipes.  My conundrum is that he has, as far as I can tell, two macaron cookbooks and I don't know which one I should get.  I can't tell if one is just an updated version of the other or a reissue or what the differences really are.  I was hoping somebody had some insight.  I have searched online and haven't seen both books referenced in the same context or contrasted at all.
       
      This one appears to be older.

       
      And this one appears to be the newer of the two.

       
      Any insight would be helpful.
       
      Thanks,
       
    • By K8CanCook
      Update!! --- the sale is still going on at Amazon as of Sunday (11/24) at 11:15am EST
      ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
       
      Did anyone note the sale price on Modernist Cuisine today (maybe yesterday)? Amazon and Target dropped the set of tomes to $379!!!
       
      This price looks like it will change after today...so get it ASAP!!!

      https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/0982761007?pf_rd_p=183f5289-9dc0-416f-942e-e8f213ef368b&pf_rd_r=SRFCHFB5EFTGAA8AZHJX
      -or-
      https://www.target.com/p/modernist-cuisine-by-nathan-myhrvold-chris-young-maxime-bilet-hardcover/-/A-77279948
    • By Bollo
      I need a book on the application of rotavapor machine. I've searched something on web but i can't find something strictly professional for the kitchen please help me. To improve the research. 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...