Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

wd-50 2004 - 2007


flinflon28
 Share

Recommended Posts

Admin: An archive of previous discussion on wd-50 may be found here.

Has anyone visited WD-50 recently? Wylie had a table at the Time Out New York tasting two weeks ago and it was delicious! He was also very friendly. Has anyone had a recent experience they'd like to share? I'm thinking of making a reservation for next month.

Edited by slkinsey (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I ate at the bar on Friday night .... first time in a few months....interesting fall menu.

Began with venison tartare and edamame ice cream....this dish was more cerebral than tasty...it needed some sort of bite (maybe the obvious -- wasabe?)

Delicious, unctuous pork belly...highly recommend this. For fun, I asked the bartender to pair a beer with this dish -- he chose an Anchor Steam Porter....which, of well-known brews, was a fine choice.....however, I was looking for something more artisanal/obscure....I didn't look at the beer list but I'm surmising that it must be rather ordinary...

dessert: pineapple with tequila ice cream and chili sauce (which would have worked with the venison tartare)....terrific. thankfully, the rumors of Sam Mason leaving a few months ago were untrue....he's still going strong.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I happened to have eaten there Friday night also, and it was stunning. Certainly recommended. The veal tongue, endive soup, lamb rack, and monkfish were all amazing. Sam was trying out a few new dessert that night which were also top notch. The chocolate cream with Tonka bean ice cream is worth a trip to NYC alone...

WD~50 has some really cool stuff that everyone who is interested in expanding their horizons must experience. I warn you: It is not the kind of pace that you would want to eat twice a week, but it will provide you with a sense of discovery in a way that will make you both analyze and simplify food as we know it

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Yup, I had the Foie Gras.  The textures are absolutely amazing, though I didn't care for the Nori flavor (I found it too assertive).  A highly recommended dish on execution alone.

the nori is also in the liquid center ? is it a kind of vinaigrette or coulis or what is it ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, I had the Foie Gras.  The textures are absolutely amazing, though I didn't care for the Nori flavor (I found it too assertive).  A highly recommended dish on execution alone.

the nori is also in the liquid center ? is it a kind of vinaigrette or coulis or what is it ?

The nori in the center could probably be considered a syrup. It was so dark and sharp in flavor that I wouldnt be surprised if Wylie was using some anchovy product; ala his signature dish. The Foie Gras is certainly inspiring.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can't remove the sensuality from eating. To say that Dufresne doesn't stretch his food by the pleasure principle is only to say that it's all very nice without actually being . . . very nice. For those who haven't eaten widely along these lines: This isn't because it's avant guarde - but because it's Dufresne's cooking. Gagnaire certainly had me groaning with visceral pleasure (not to mention squirming with shock). Blumenthal's ice-creams (not to mention his other dishes) - bacon and egg, sardines on buttery toast, pommery mustard - were nothing if not absolutely sensual. To hear Tarka speak of Achatz is a study in adjectival sensuality.

A meal last week at WD-50 had me agreeing with many of the above posts. The cooking was very well done, imaginative, well crafted - but none of it in a world of limited budgets was a reason to return.

The most exciting dish was actually a tagliolini made with pureed shrimp which Wylie sent us as an extra course (I was fortunate enough to be dining with a aquaintence of his).

Generally I thought the apps portions were too small, and oddly, the mains were rather over-large. Perhaps catering to some New York quirk. The crowd was interesting - it didn't seem to have many train-spotters (like meself), just New Yorkers out for a good meal.

The deserts, I thought, were sensually the most successful - especially the Carrot-lime ravioli, coconut tapioca, lime sherbet, cumin. A fantastic dish, and a real adventure to eat.

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been following this thread with interest as I expect to finally visit WD-50 with some friends in December. I very much enjoyed WD's food at 71 Clinton. I particularly enjoy creative food so long as it is successful. What I had at 71 Clinton most certainly was on every level. In what way or ways is his food different now than then (for all or anyone who can compare)?

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can't remove the sensuality from eating. To say that Dufresne doesn't stretch his food by the pleasure principle is only to say that it's all very nice without actually being . . . very nice. For those who haven't eaten widely along these lines: This isn't because it's avant guarde - but because it's Dufresne's cooking. Gagnaire certainly had me groaning with visceral pleasure (not to mention squirming with shock). Blumenthal's ice-creams (not to mention his other dishes) - bacon and egg, sardines on buttery toast, pommery mustard - were nothing if not absolutely sensual. To hear Tarka speak of Achatz is a study in adjectival sensuality.

A meal last week at WD-50 had me agreeing with many of the above posts. The cooking was very well done, imaginative, well crafted - but none of it in a world of limited budgets was a reason to return.

The most exciting dish was actually a tagliolini made with pureed shrimp which Wylie sent us as an extra course (I was fortunate enough to be dining with a aquaintence of his).

Generally I thought the apps portions were too small, and oddly, the mains were rather over-large. Perhaps catering to some New York quirk. The crowd was interesting - it didn't seem to have many train-spotters (like meself), just New Yorkers out for a good meal.

The deserts, I thought, were sensually the most successful - especially the Carrot-lime ravioli, coconut tapioca, lime sherbet, cumin. A fantastic dish, and a real adventure to eat.

*blushes*

i'm there on saturday night. if only we'd been able to organise diaries....i'll look out for that desert.

Suzi Edwards aka "Tarka"

"the only thing larger than her bum is her ego"

Blogito ergo sum

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Last month I dinnered WD-50 in New York -- first visit -- and had their tasting menu.

Course 1: "Fluke, artichoke soup, papaya, tuna powder." Not a great beginning. The artichoke and papaya worked well together -- and had an interesting high sour note -- but the fish was lost in the noise.

Course 2: "Foie gras, grapefruit-basil crumble, nori caramel." A nice dish. The nori caramel was inside a foie gras ball, with baby basil leaves, slightly dehydrated grapefruit, brioche croutons, and fleur de sel.

Course 3: "Rainbow trout, pork belly, apple cider, horseradish, miso paper." Pretty good. The apple cider was a cream, and there was also candied lime.

Course 4: "Beef tongue, fried mayo, tomato molasses." An excellent dish which, on another menu, would be called something like "deconstructed deli sandwich." The pickled tongue was delicious, the fried mayo was good, and it came with Romaine lettuce stems and onion strussel.

Course 5: "Shrimp noodles, smoked yogurt, nori powder." This came with prawn crisps and was sprinkled with paprika. A neat dish.

Course 6: "Slow poached egg, parmesan broth, tomato." Course of the night. I've had slow-poached eggs -- 147 degrees is critical -- and they're delicious. This one came with chick pea and parmesan broth, noodles, tomato powder, and baby chives. Absolutely stunning.

Course 7: "Lamb sweetbread, green daikon, eggplant honey puree, chocolate powder." This was the night's only clunker. I wanted the sweetbread to be crisper. The eggplant was delicious,but the daikon wasn't. And the chocolate didn't add. (I'm kind of done with chocolate being the trendy ingredient. Bring back salsify or something.)

Course 8: "Squab, encrusted golden beats, sweet potato juice." The squab was delicious. The beets were covered with crispy beet bits. Everything about this dish was delicious.

Course 9: "Quince tonic, manchego." Palate cleanser. Fine.

Course 10: "Caramelized butternut squash, chocolate consomme." This also came with a puree of graham cracker. Very good.

Course 11: "Chocolate cream, coffee soil, tonka bean ice cream." This came with apricot powder, basil sauce, and apricot sauce. Delicious.

Course 12: "Mulled apple cider, pine-needle cotton candy." The cider was tasty, and the cotton candy was silly.

We expected an edgy menu, and weren't disappointed. Two of the dishes were clunkers, but some were absolutely delicious. All were interesting.

Bruce

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Had dinner with a friend at WD-50 on Thursday and we had the experience we were expecting...challenging food with some hits and misses.

We were greeted warmly by the hostess which was no small feat as she had been slammed with a party of fifteen ten seconds before we arrived. One thing that struck me as we were seated was that there was not the "smell" you usually experience when entering a restaurant. I suppose it depends on how rich the food is at a particular place but usually there is a mix of aromas that hit me when I am being taken to my seat. For example the smell of what I imagine is a bit of fat and other savory aromas are always linked with being taken to my seat at Daniel. And there's a scent of goat cheese and onion soup at Balthazar.

I imagine that part of this is due to the fact that the restaurant wasn't at capacity when we arrived at 8:00.

Upon being seated I was thrilled to have a view of the kitchen as I am starting culinary school next month and love the sight of a line in action. Wylie was in the house and I was impressed to see how calm everything seemed to be in the kitchen...especially as the orders of the large party downstsairs started flowing in along with those of the regular patrons. The house was definitely full by 8:45. My dining companion was dissapointed to hear that pastry chef Sam Mason was not in that night as my companion has a massive crush on him from the photo on the WD-50 website.

Conventional bread is not served at WD-50 rather a very thin, paperlike starch sprinkled with seeds and possibly pepper. Seeing as how most of Wylie's dishes have a sauce or broth that will not be finished with the main ingrdient a bit of "sop up" bread would be nice but I have to admit that the thin bread is very addictive and most importantly not filling.

Although no one on this forum has really complained about the portions being too small, I have spoken to a number of individuals who said they left hungry.

To be on the safe side we ordered four appetizers to share. The server was kind enough to bring them out as two separate courses. We started with the corned duck on rye crisps and the fois gras with nori caramel. As soon as my companion cut into the fois gras his expression was priceless...it seems he'd forgotten something was going to ooze out and he looked like a gradeschooler who'd done something wrong and was looking to see if anyone had noticed. The combination of nori and cold fois gras was not one that was too appealing. The nori was VERY overpowering. The cool fois gras was tasty on it's own but unfortunately the nori distracted too much for our liking. The corned duck was just what it was...that is not to say it was bad in any sense...in fact it was quite good. I just couldn't really tell the difference between it and corned beef. The rye crisp was lovely and the purple/horseradish/mustard was visually awesome and tasty.

Our next courses were the pickled tongue and the venison tartare. The pickled tongue was a pleasant surprise to me because I never thought I'd ever eat tongue in my life but this is the dish that has fried mayonaise so I HAD to have it. I have to admit that it was pretty good. To me it tasted like baloney...which I guess makes sense. The fried mayonaise is one of those sensations that makes someone stop what they're doing, smack their had like they had a damn good idea and really evaluate what is happening in their mouth. It is like warm heaven and I can't believe it hasn't been done before. A marble sized ball of fries mayo has a delicate skin which pops in your mouth releasing warm liquid on your tongue.

The venison tartare was beautifully presented and must have been a huge hit with my dining companion as he would not part with a bite for me...eventually he relented and I felt the dish tasted like Chrstmas! I can't really explain this feeling but if Christmas with it's snow, pine trees and eggnog where to have a taste it would be this dish. The tartare came with edemame ice cream and cruncy pear.

Entrees came next. I had the monkfish with oyster mushroom, pumpernickel cocoa, pear concome and squash. I felt the portion was quite generous and while the fish was well prepared it was quite bland. I didn't think the pear broth was strong enough to add anything but mositure to the dish and the pumpernickel coca was a jarring and somewhat unpleasant addition to the proceedings. I can almost imagine it tasting good with the squash but if that it is the case it should not have been in the pear broth with the fish.

My friend had the lamb and it was truly the winning dish of the evening. Served with pickled cranberries (how refreshing to not have mint forced upon you when ordering lamb!), goat cheese consome, potato and leek. This was an almost conventional dish and I felt the cut of lamb was the perfect mixture of a bit of fat, lean meat and good flavor. Aces!

Desserts were carrot ginger cake with coconut sorbet and carrot coulis. Stunning dessert and incredibly flavorful and somewhat spicy.

I had the "French Toast" which though laughably small was stunning. It consisted of a french toast stick the size of a lincoln log sprinkled with what I think was cinnamon and a bit of ice cream. There is no description on the menu and I was to gone on sparkling wine to rememeber the explanation.

We also asked for some ginger cotton candy which is only part of the dessert menu but they were happy to oblige...WOW! What a flavor sensation. Delicious.

Our dinner of 4 appetizers, two entrees, two desserts and two bottles of sparking wine was $295 with tip.

Are we going back? Probably not. Did we enjoy our meal and were we challenged? Without a doubt. And I love hearing people's reactions when I tell them about fried mayonaise!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, I don't have time to go into a lot of detail at the moment, but I dined at WD-50 last week and in a week of eating at all sorts of wonderful restaurants including Ducasse, Kurumazushi, Babbo, Sripraphai, Sushi Yasuda, Franny's this was my favorite. It is my ideal of a New York restaurant. The food was beautiful, interesting, delicious and fun. The room has received some bad press, though I found it and the service very comfortable. The space, attitude and indeed the food are all perfect for its location. Would I go back? In a heartbeat. My comments on WD-50 are not meant to disparage any of the other restaurants I mentioned. They were all great in their own ways, but none resonated with me quite the way WD-50 did. The two closest were probably Sushi Yasuda and Babbo.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It could be, but I'm not sure that he'd want to be seen in my company. :biggrin:

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doc thanks for your brief review and giving WD-50 such a high mark compared to all the other places you went to last week.

I'm thinking about a few places to go for NYE, WD-50 is definitely one of the places I will consider now!

Happy Holidays :biggrin:

"On ne voit bien qu'avec le coeur. L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux." - Le Petit Prince

Visit My Webpage

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really enjoyed my meal at WD-50 for the reasons I stated above. Since I was the only one at the table who wanted to order a tasing menu we didn't do it, although they did let us order dishes from the tasting menu. I started with the lamb sweetbreads, green daikon, black bean and chocolate powder, which had a subtle lambiness to them and great texture, as my appetizer and then the squab with beet powder encrusted golden beets and sweet potato reduction for my main course. It was under Chef Dufresne at 71 Clinton that I first had squab. It was a revelation then and it still is under his expert hand. The beets and sweet potato juice reduction were also delicious as well as intellectually interesting and visually beautiful. We had an array of desserts all of which were beautiful, fantastic and previously described on this board. The tonka bean ice cream was particularly fun as the only other place we have encountered tonka beans was at Can Roca in Catalunya (actually my wife had them as I was sick that day and didn't partake:sad:).Contrary to some on this board, though, I found the cotton candy to be fun and extremely tasty.

The wine list, though not extraordinarily large, was interesting, eclectic and fairly priced. We had a gorgeous red from the Balearic Islands that went very well with our diverse, but red-wine friendly meals.

It was too dark to get good photos of our meal, but afterwards I did ask to meet Chef Dufresne since I wanted to tell him how much we enjoyed his meal and his restaurant. Amazingly to me, when I introduced myself to him by my given name (the reservations were in my friend's name), he recognized it and referred to me as "docsconz"! We had an interesting conversation about eGullet (He admits to lurking :cool: ), his food, Spain and culinaria in general. He invited us to tour the kitchen and observe some preparation. He was also gracious enough to allow me to take some photos. Even with a digital camera, it is not possible to fully determine when a photo is really good enough. That being said, a few of the photos didn't turn out quite as well as I had hoped and I still missed some opportunities that in retrospect I wish I had taken such as getting a better visual handle on the sous vide cookery.

Some photos from the kitchen of WD-50:

Chef Dufresne cooking at his station.

gallery_8158_501_1103820016.jpg

The finishing station.

gallery_8158_501_1103820074.jpg

Sam Mason checks an order.

gallery_8158_501_1103820386.jpg

An action shot.

gallery_8158_501_1103820458.jpg

From pan to plate.

gallery_8158_501_1103820517.jpg

Finishing touches by Pastry Chef Sam Mason

gallery_8158_501_1103820700.jpg

With Wylie

gallery_8158_501_1103820848.jpg

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It looks like you had a ball and I'm glad you got to meet Wylie. Interesting about his recognizing you...I'd heard rumors that he little to no experience with the internet. My friend wants me to tell you e is vey jealous that Sam Mason was there on the night you attended. we went last thursday and he wasn't working...my friend has a massive crush on him from the picture on the website! :wub:

I LOVED the cotton candy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

. . .  Interesting about his recognizing you...I'd heard rumors that he little to no experience with the internet. . . . .

I met him over two years ago in passing at the Union Square Greenmarket. He was talking to Mike Anthony and Mike and Dan Barber had just done an eGullet Q&A. The subject came up and he said he didn't use or have a computer. I realize that was a long time ago now, but at the time it didn't seem as if it was possible to pursue the subject.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Anonymous Modernist 16589
      I'm looking to buy some new pots and pans and would like to tap into your knowledege and experiance with them. Which pans tend to yield the best and most consistant results. Same for pots. Any and all recommendations would be greatly appriciated, thank you in advance.
      Herman 8D
    • By Doodad
      Has anybody tried making a dark roux in a pressure cooker? Can this be done without scortching do you think? I have made roux in the oven before and started wondering about this topic.
    • By kostbill
      I really want to improve the flavor of my chicken breast so I want to try to inject brine with fat and flavors.
       
      I would like to try brining with some hydrocolloids. The one example I found is this: https://torontofoodlab.com/2013/08/20/meat-tenderizing-with-a-carrageenan-brine/.
       
      However I cannot apply that to my chicken breast because I am cooking it sous vide, so the chicken will not reach the temperature needed for the carrageenan to gel.
       
      I am thinking of using Methyl cellulose, first disperse in hot water, then leave it for 24 hours in the fridge, then add salt, fat and flavors and inject it.
      I am afraid that until it reaches the 50C or 60C that the Methyl cellulose needs in order to gel, the liquid will escape.
      Any ideas?
      Thanks.
    • By Anonymous Modernist 760
      Thanks for putting up this forum 🙂
      I would like to bake using a combination of sous vide and a conventional oven. Would it be possible to put the dough in a vacuum bag cook it sous vide at 37C for the dough to raise optimal and then put it in a conventional oven?
      Thanks
    • By PedroG
      Olla podrida sous vide
      Origin
      Not rotten pot, but mighty or rich pot! Originated in 16th century Spain, olla poderida became olla podrida and was falsely translated into French as pot-pourri.
      Ingredients
      For two servings
      * 100g Brisket well marbled, cooked SV 48h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Pork meat well marbled, cooked SV 24h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Lamb chops without bone, cooked SV 4h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chicken breast, cooked SV 2h/58°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chorizo, sliced approximately 4mm †
      * 125g Chickpeas (garbanzos), soaked overnight in water †
      * 1 Onion chopped medium-fine †
      * ½ Savoy cabbage approx. 200g cut into pieces, thick leaf veins removed
      * ½ Celeriac approx. 200g quartered, sliced about 2mm
      * 2 Carrots sliced approximately 120g about 3mm
      * 1 Leek approximately 20cm / 100g sliced about 5mm
      * Extra virgin olive oil
      * Rice bran oil
      * Dried parsley qs, aromatic, black pepper
      † Beef, pork, lamb and chicken (or at least two kinds of meat) as well as chorizo, chickpeas and onions are mandatory ingredients, other vegetables vary according to desire and availability.
      Cooking
      Boil chickpeas in water for 30-60 min.
      Sauté onions in olive oil, add chorizo, continue sautéing, add chickpeas including its cooking water, add remaining vegetables, cover and cook to the desired softness, stir from time to time. If additional liquid is needed, you may add Sherry instead of water.
      Reduce heat. Season to taste. Add parsley.
      In a heavy skillet, sear the meat dice in just smoking hot rice bran oil (very high smoking point allows very quick sear, not overdoing the center of the meat).
      Sear one kind of meat at a time and transfer to the pan with the vegetables.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...