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achevres

How about the sauce?

10 posts in this topic

I can never get that NY pizza sauce taste. What are the secrets? Thanks!

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I don't think there are any real secrets. The sauce at DiFaro's in Brookly is one of the best I've had and I think the secret is Dominic DMarco (and his little orgegano plant in the window). Of course, he's been making pizzas in that same spot for the past 40 years.

I think the key is to keep it simple and don't cook the sauce if your tomatoes come out of a can (and try to use ground whole plum tomatoes instead of puree or paste, or anything called "pizza sauce"). San Marzano is the famous Italian imported brand (and type) but there are many great American tomato products such as anything from Stanislaus (6 in 1 is their most famous pizzeria sauce and you can sometimes find it in small cans), Muir Glen, and even Hunts and other major brands. Use dried basil and oregano only if you like them, as well as granuated garlic and salt and pepper to taste. Don't mess with it too much--simple is often better than complex in this matter. Make it thin and easy to spread and don't use too much. I have a couple of recipe variations for this in "American Pie," but I think the main error home cooks make is to cook the sauce. It will get cooked on the pizza so if you cook it in advance it takes away from the brightness of flavor.

Finally, in the end, it's a personal taste issue and, as cooks, it about personal touch.

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I'll add something here, that is pertinent to canned tomatoes. You'll notice that some cans have a white enamel coating on the inside. This helps a lot to keep down the tinny,flavor that plagues so many canned acidic foods (tomatoes, grapefruit juice, etc.). The manufactures who use enameled cans are taking an extra step to keep the flavors fresh. Maybe for restaurant supply there isn't so much choice but for us supermarket consumers, you might as well exercise the choice.

Hal

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Peter, I have a chef connection that may get me a can of Stanislau.

I was looking on the web and Stanislau doesn't have a "6 in 1" product. They have 7/11, Pizzaletto, 74/40, Full-Red PizzaSauce, Saporito and Al Dente (and also plum tomatoes). Which sauce were you referring to?

A company called Escalon makes the "6 in 1" sauce. From another board I get the impresion that 7/11 or the Full-Red sauce are similiar to the "6 in 1". Escalon will ship a "small" order of 3 cans. What do you think? Both brands are fresh-packed.


Edited by achevres (log)

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I don't think there are any real secrets. The sauce at DiFaro's in Brookly is one of the best I've had and I think the secret is Dominic DMarco (and his little orgegano plant in the window). Of course, he's been making pizzas in that same spot for the past 40 years.

DiFara's

-mjr


�As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy, and to make plans.� - Ernest Hemingway, in �A Moveable Feast�

Brooklyn, NY, USA

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In addition to fresh tomatoes, good olive oil and his basil plant I think Domenic DiMarco cooks left over prosciuttini and parmigiano rinds in his sauce to give it that extra something, and then removes them when they have rendered their "oomph"


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Peter, I have a chef connection that may get me a can of Stanislau.

I was looking on the web and Stanislau doesn't have a "6 in 1" product. They have  7/11, Pizzaletto, 74/40, Full-Red PizzaSauce, Saporito and Al Dente (and also plum tomatoes). Which sauce were you referring to?

A company called Escalon makes the "6 in 1" sauce. From another board I get the impresion that  7/11 or the Full-Red sauce are similiar to the "6 in 1". Escalon will ship a "small" order of 3 cans. What do you think? Both brands are fresh-packed.

You're right it's Escalon, not Stanislau. They both are excellent brands, fairly comparable in terms of the riopeness of the tomatoes they choose. I think you'll be happy with either brand. Let me know which one you end up preferring. It would be a great survey for all of us to share favorite brands and why.

Thanks!

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In addition to fresh tomatoes, good olive oil and his basil plant I think Domenic DiMarco cooks left over prosciuttini and parmigiano rinds in his sauce to give it that extra something, and then removes them when they have rendered their "oomph"

What a great trick--no wonder I like his sauce so much! This is one time when pre-cooking may be a plus.

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but I think the main error home cooks make is to cook the sauce. It will get cooked on the pizza so if you cook it in advance it takes away from the brightness of flavor.

  Finally, in the end, it's a personal taste issue and, as cooks, it about personal touch.

Bingo!

I think you might have solved my "brightness problem" Thanks!

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