Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Fat Guy

World's best carrot-cake recipe

Recommended Posts

If you need it, then I got it, FG: :wink:

This is my tried and true carrot cake with maple cream cheese icing straight from Epicurious (as usual):

here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marcel Desaulnier's has coconut and pineapple and is hands-down the best I've ever tasted. You don't really end up tasting either a distinct flavor of coconut OR pineapple, but those ingredients add moisture and texture. I was going to provide an Amazon link but their search engine is seriously broken at the moment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here you go:

Frog Commissary Carrot Cake

There is none better than this. This is the recipe made famous at Phiadelphia's sorely missed Commissary restaurant, one of the places that led the "restaurant renaissance" here back in the 70's and 80's. The Amazon reviews of the Frog Commissary Cookbook say it's worth buying the book just for the carrot cake recipe alone. That might be true, but it's an excellent book all around.

The carrot cake does RULE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carrots are good for you. That's why I always try to eat at least two pieces and make sure they're generous portions :biggrin:

And at age 48 I don't need reading glasses - I think there may be something to that whole "carrots are good for your eyes" thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bo Friberg's Carrot sponge from his " Professional Pastry Chef" is the moistest carrot cake I have ever seen. Never need to use simple syrup, and has gotten rave reviews from all who have tasted it ( a cream cheese frosting of your choice makes a great filling )

Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Which of the above recipes is really the best?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever recipe you use, instead of the usual vegetable oil, use half vegetable oil and half melted butter. You get the characteristic moistness of carrot cake and the wonderful flavor of butter. Mmmm. I could use a slice of carrot cake now!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best recipe would be determined by what you're looking for in your carrot cake. Very moist? Drier, more cake-like? To do nuts/raisins or not? How strong do you like the spicing?

Personally I prefer the cake to be moist (but not overly so, like many zucchini cakes are) and not too sweet. The cream cheese frosting is where I want the sugary sweetness to come in. I've had nuts crushed and scattered on top which is good, since I don't want them in the cake itself. No, no raisins.

That said, Cooks Illustrated's web site has a better than passable recipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I vote for the Carrot Pecan Cake with Fresh Orange Glaze offered by Jean Anderson in "The Grass Roots Cookbook". The cake is baked in a tube pan, split into 3 layers all glazed with a cooked and thickened orange glaze. Perfect for people (like me) who can't abide cream cheese icing.

Other marvelous desserts from this book are:

Banana-Walnut Cake (I omit walnuts from cake and add them to a browned butter icing)

Blue Grass Cheese Pie (my favorite chess pie, has light cream to cut the sweetness)

French Cookies (one-bowl cake-like bar cookies with coffee, raisins and spices, a chocolate icing; great last minute recipe)

The book is from the 70s, has had many reprints but is now out-of-print. Some used copies available on Amazon. Or, if anyone wants any of these recipes, let me know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The carrot cakes above look wonderful. But have you tried them without the frostings? I love carrot cake, but I like it best just as a loaf cake, without any frosting. It is a completely different kind of cake than a layered, frosted carrot cake. I've been making the one in Moosewood for years, it's a standard and pretty good loaf cake, but nothing special. And why shouldn't a loaf cake be special? :smile:

The triple layer cake with citrus cream cheese frosting looks truly wonderful, and I might try that without the frosting. But one question: it calls for only 2 cups of flour (and 2 cups of sugar and 4 eggs). Is that a typo? It seems like it should take more flour than that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Where's mktye when we need her?
:laugh: Off shopping at Ikea.

Carrot cake is my husband's favorite cake. I always use the recipe from The Silver Palate cookbook. Like the one Carolyn Tillie recommended, it contains coconut and pineapple.

But I agree with petite tête de chou--what criteria does one use to judge carrot cake?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Where's mktye when we need her?
:laugh: Off shopping at Ikea.

Carrot cake is my husband's favorite cake. I always use the recipe from The Silver Palate cookbook. Like the one Carolyn Tillie recommended, it contains coconut and pineapple.

But I agree with petite tête de chou--what criteria does one use to judge carrot cake?

Just an aside, carrot cake is my husbands favorite too! I think its more 'homey' and less processed and 'fancified' than most cakes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best one I have ever had is my cousin's recipe. I will be happy to send it to you by PM.

I just found a link to the recipe UCLA Carrot Cake


Edited by Swisskaese (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've tried about twenty recipes for carrot cake in the last two years. My favourite is from Southern Living. The buttermilk glaze between the layers just adds something really special to a great cake.

http://food4.epicurious.com/HyperNews/get/...8005/1/1/1.html

Interesting topic...I was just PM'ing Sinclair about her favorite carrot cake recipe, and it happened to be the exact same one that was my current favorite (although I was planning on trying it with half butter, like what browniebaker said). I make mine without the nuts and sometimes without the coconut. The coconut adds a lot of flavor to the cake though, so I may try it again with ground coconut.

And the funny thing is, it's the same recipe as this one!

So that's 3 votes for this one... :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8<

The triple layer cake with citrus cream cheese frosting looks truly wonderful, and I might try that without the frosting. But one question: it calls for only 2 cups of flour (and 2 cups of sugar and 4 eggs). Is that a typo? It seems like it should take more flour than that.

>8

We (well, mostly my wife - but I found the recipe) used the recipe as written and had no problems.

As I recall, this is a moist cake, not in any way dense or 'loafy'.

I sometimes don't like carrot cakes, because they taste too 'carrot-y' and not very 'cake-y'. There should be a distinction between carrot cake and carrot bread.

This was very nice with all of the citrus brightening up and playing well against the earthy carrot flavor. The optional candied nuts are a must.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always use the recipe from The Silver Palate cookbook. Like the one Carolyn Tillie recommended, it contains coconut and pineapple.

This one wins my vote too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, listen. This is getting way out of hand. Somebody needs to test these recipes, feed them to a judging panel, and post the results. Otherwise I'm going to have like 8 bookmarks just for carrot cake alone!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here you go:

Frog Commissary Carrot Cake

There is none better than this. This is the recipe made famous at Phiadelphia's sorely missed Commissary restaurant, one of the places that led the "restaurant renaissance" here back in the 70's and 80's. The Amazon reviews of the Frog Commissary Cookbook say it's worth buying the book just for the carrot cake recipe alone. That might be true, but it's an excellent book all around.

The carrot cake does RULE.

Steven, I second Katie's nomination of the Frog Commissary carrot cake. I've made it at least a dozen times, and always -- ALWAYS, I SAID -- folks tell me it's the single best carrot cake. Trust us on this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread sent me searching for my old copy of The Commissary carrot cake recipe, which I obtained while living in Philadelphia in the late 1970s. I compared the two recipes, which were very close, and noted only a few discrepancies, primarily in the pecan cream filling.

My recipe calls for 2 C sugar, 6 T flour, 1 t salt, 2 C heavy cream, 1/2 lb. unsalted butter, I 1/2 C pecans and 1 T vanilla. The preparation instructions are otherwise the same.

For the cake, my recipe calls for 2 C less 2 T flour and confirms the notation at the bottom of the linked page that the amount of baking soda is 1 t.

For what it's worth, I always felt that my recipe's pecan cream filling was sweeter than the restaurant's version, so the published recipe may in fact be better as well as more authentic. I'm posting what I have for those who may prefer a sweeter filling.

In any event, I have never had a better carrot cake than The Commissary's and it was a sad day for Philadelphia when that restaurant closed (although I was long gone from the city by that time).


Edited by Brent Kulman (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Years ago, Cuisinart had a monthly magazine of recipes. In one of them was a terrific, easy food processor carrot cake recipe. If anyone out there has saved their Cuisinart magazines, could they post this recipe for this person. It was the best I ever remember, although a bit on the oily side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      ORANGE CREME BRULEE WITH MILLET GROATS
       
      One of our friends said recently that he doesn't cook for himself. He eats what his wife prepares: sometimes it is something healthy and other times something yummy. It was a joke, of course, because his wife cooks really well, but this sentence is now in our friendly canon of jokes.

      Inspired by our talk about groats, flakes and healthy food, I prepared a dessert which combines excellent taste and healthy ingredients. The original recipe comes from the Lidl cookery book. I would like to share with you my version of this dish. I recommend Crème brûlée with millet groats to everybody who counts calories. It is mild, not too sweet, wonderfully creamy inside and with an incredible crunchy crust on top. That's why we love crème brûlée, don't we? I prepared a cranberry-orange preserve to offset the sweetness of the dessert. The whole dessert looked beautiful and tasted perfect.
       
      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      crème brûlée
      100g of dry millet groats
      350ml of almond milk
      1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
      2-3 tablespoons of brown sugar (3 additional tablespoons for the sugar crust)
      juice and skin from one orange
       
      confiture:
      150g of fresh cranberries
      juice and peel from one orange
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Put the millet groats in a sifter, clean them with cold water and then douse them with hot water. Put the groats, almond milk, sugar and vanilla essence into a saucepan with a heavy bottom. Boil it with the lid on without stirring for 15-18 minutes until the liquid has evaporated. Leave to cool down. Add the orange juice and peel, mix it in and blend until the mixture is perfectly smooth. Put the dessert into small bowls and leave in the fridge for one hour. Wash the cranberries. Add the orange juice and peel and the sugar and boil for 10-15 minutes. Try it and add some sugar if you think the dessert is too sour. Take out the bowls from the fridge. Sprinkle them with the sugar and burn it with a small kitchen burner to make a crunchy caramel crust. Decorate the dessert with a small teaspoon of the cranberry preserve. Serve the rest of the preserve separately in small dishes.
       
       


    • By MrJonathanGreen40
      One of my friends is leaving for Spain next week, and I’m planning to surprise her with a party before she leaves. Since she’s a huge lover of sweets, I decided to buy her a cake. I don’t know where to start looking, but my brother suggested that I buy from this online provider of custom cakes. I checked their website, and I think they have cakes that my friend will love. I haven’t bought anything yet because I want to be 100% sure that their cakes are truly excellent. Do you have any idea how I should examine cakes through the Internet? What are the things that I must take into consideration? Thanks!
    • By Kasia
      My Irish Coffee  
      Today the children will have to forgive me, but adults also sometimes want a little pleasure. This is a recipe for people who don't have to drive a car or work, i.e. for lucky people or those who can rest at the weekend. Irish coffee is a drink made with strong coffee, Irish Whiskey, whipped cream and brown sugar. It is excellent on cold days. I recommend it after an autumn walk or when the lack of sun really gets you down. Basically, you can spike the coffee with any whiskey, but in my opinion Jameson Irish Whiskey is the best for this drink.

      If you don't like whiskey, instead you can prepare another kind of spiked coffee: French coffee with brandy, Spanish coffee with sherry, or Jamaican coffee with dark rum.
      Ingredients (for 2 drinks)
      300ml of strong, hot coffee
      40ml of Jameson Irish Whiskey
      150ml of 30% sweet cream
      4 teaspoons of coarse brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of caster sugar
      4 drops of vanilla essence
      Put two teaspoons of brown sugar into the bottom of two glasses. Brew some strong black coffee and pour it into the glasses. Warm the whiskey and add it to the coffee. Whisk the sweet cream with the caster sugar and vanilla essence. Put it gently on top so that it doesn't mix with the coffee.

      Enjoy your drink!
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Pumpkin muffins with chocolate
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for a dessert which was made with internet inspiration and the combination of two other recipes: carrot cake and pumpkin muffins with fruit stew. These muffins were an immediate hit at my Halloween party last year. I had to use baked and blended pumpkin for them. This time I used raw, grated pumpkin. I prepare carrot cake in exactly the same way. One of the ingredients in both desserts is cinnamon. It gives baked goods a slight taste of gingerbread. Thanks to the juicy vegetables, the muffins are moist and yummy even the next day.

      Ingredients (for 24 muffins)
      210g of grated pumpkin
      2 eggs
      200g of flour
      180ml of oil
      180ml of milk
      130g of brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of baking powder
      1 teaspoon of cinnamon
      100g of chopped dark chocolate
      150g of white chocolate

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Put some paper muffin moulds into the "dimples" of a baking pan for muffins.
      Mix together the dry ingredients of the muffins: flour, sugar, baking powder and cinnamon. Mix together the grated pumpkin, oil, milk and egg in a separate bowl. Add the egg mixture to the dry ingredients and mix them in. Put the dough into some paper muffin moulds. Bake for 25-30 minutes. Melt the white chocolate in a bain-marie. Decorate the muffins with the chocolate.


    • By Kasia
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for swift autumn cookies with French pastry and a sweet ginger-cinnamon-pear stuffing. Served with afternoon coffee they warm us up brilliantly and dispel the foul autumn weather.

      Ingredients (8 cookies)
      1 pack of chilled French pastry
      1 big pear
      1 flat teaspoon of cinnamon
      1 teaspoon of fresh grated ginger
      2 tablespoons of brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of vanilla sugar
      2 tablespoons of milk

      Heat the oven up to 190C. Cover a baking sheet with some baking paper.
      Wash the pear, peel and cube it. Add the grated ginger, cinnamon, vanilla sugar and one tablespoon of the brown sugar. Mix them in. Cut 8 circles out of the French pastry. Cut half of every circle into parallel strips. Put the pear stuffing onto the other half of each circle. Roll up the cookies starting from the edges with the stuffing. Put them onto the baking paper and make them into cones. Smooth the top of the pastry with the milk and sprinkle with brown sugar. bake for 20-22 minutes.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×