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mnebergall

Restaurant Eve

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Steve,

Glad you thought the conversation was worthwhile. I will certainly be more careful in the future about describing states and timings and levels of intoxication! :raz:

Regarding the neighbhorhood designation, I think to me, this is a *really* high honor. In NY, my favorite restaurants are what I'd call neighborhood-- ie. Prune, 71 Clinton, Tasting Room, etc. In my opinion, these somewhat smaller, slightly more casual joints offer great food at reasonable prices --and I feel this is lacking overall in DC. We're dominated by big corporate-esque hotel-esque establishments, like DC Coast, 15 ria, Galileo, Kinkead's...sprawling places that lack a true sense of intimacy with chef and owner. Sure there are exceptions, and I'm hoping for more of them.

Happy to be a rabblerouser in my remaining days before I leave you all for the Midwest! :biggrin:


Food is a convenient way for ordinary people to experience extraordinary pleasure, to live it up a bit.

-- William Grimes

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It might just be semantics keeping us apart on that Sara--to me, intimacy occurs at all price points and at all destinations, from high to low, and yes, even within hotels. And also to me neighborhood places can also be destination restaurants--like the ones you mentioned, and to that list I'd add a Blue Hill in NY or a Django in Philly as perhaps even better examples--which are both pretty good comparisons for Eve, by the way. It might be the "casual" tag that separates us a bit--and the difference between that and what might be called a more relaxed formality--and my initial (and perhaps incorrect) impression of Eve is that it aims to provide this formality just in a transparent way--delivering heightened expectation and service--like at a Blue Hill--whereas places like you mentioned, a Prune or an Alias on the really low East side, or the byob Django, as you know one of my favorite US restaurants, do not. And that's one difference between a place that serves entrees priced in the mid to high teens and a place like Eve with bistro entrees hovering around 20. I think most people's expectation of Eve, even in the bistro, will be a little higher than that--yet without sacrificing any intimacy. We'll both have to try the tasting menu side of Eve next time to get a feel for that level of service as well, and that will undoubtedly be another huge way it can distinguish itself against the other casual/neighborhood restaurants you've listed--if not the other fine dining options around town. Yes they are in a neighborhood, but they really transcend the neighborhood already--and people will travel to them, regardless of the (mostly underwhelming) neighborhood. Are Firefly, Palena and Nectar "neighborhood" restaurants or are they really much more than that?


Steve Klc

Pastry chef-Restaurant Consultant

Oyamel : Zaytinya : Cafe Atlantico : Jaleo

chef@pastryarts.com

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I think "neighborhood" restaurants have increasingly become "destination" restaurants partly as the result of a fetishization of such places-- in other words, these places have become "cool" in the same way that the louder, pricy, splashy places were in the 1980s. (I'm thinking of that movie American Psycho--is that it?--at the moment.)

I agree with putting Blue Hill and Django, and Chloe, Barbuto, and Spotted Pig for that matter, in this category. I also agree there's diversity within the label of 'neighorhood' restaurant--diversity in terms of attitude/approach primarily, while actually, I don't think the variation in the primary outcome (the food) is all that different (among the highly acclaimed of this category). Nectar and Blue Hill strike me as fairly similar, as do Django and Chloe and Barbuto. With regard to intimacy levels--sure, they can be achieved in any setting, largely contingent on who you're with. I know some don't think Nectar is intimate--and I don't agree. The Inn at Easton, which I wrote about recently, surely is intimate--if you want it to be. But is it a neighborhood restaurant? No, I really don't think so (tho I don't live in the neighborhood)--it's a special occasion destination.

Not sure I've gone much beyond agreeing to a difference in semantics here Steve, but it's an interesting discussion, at least to me! What is the goal of Eve, as seen by the owners? Who is their ideal clientele? Foodies? How price-accessible do restauranteurs really want their places to be? Is one ideal to bring great food to people who might not be able to pay $25 entrees? Or has that ideal translated/transmuted into a plethora of chains who think they're doing just that?? Located in neighborhoods near you, everywhere...

ps. Having a tasting menu at all-- as Eve and Blue Hill do-- definitely sets a restaurant into a different sub-category, I think. Hugo's in Portland seems to conceive themselves as a neighborhood place, offering three different menus as does Eve. I'm going there in August and will report back on how well they pull it off.


Edited by sara (log)

Food is a convenient way for ordinary people to experience extraordinary pleasure, to live it up a bit.

-- William Grimes

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I'll keep playing devil's advocate here--I think restaurants can be many things to many people simultaneously--and my hope is we resist the natural inclination to apply labels to places--because labels can mislead. If I reacted to the "neighborhood" comment wrt Eve that was mainly my intent, Sara, a general reaction and not specific--because pretty clearly Eve's concept is to be different things to different diners at different price points each and every night. Kind of impressive and daring if you think about it--you can have that delicious baby beet salad and other gently priced apps sitting at the bar and a $7 glass of some amazing wine Todd found or you can have the $65+ tasting menu experience which from early reports (not my own, yet) seems to rival if not surpass what Gian Piero was doing so well at Elysium--which I always thought was special--except with the added plusses of Todd, wine and service. It can be a casual stop after work or the perfect upscale place for an anniversary or birthday--several of which were being celebrated in the bistro on July 6th when we dined there (unbeknownst to the house it was also my wife's birthday that night and we chose Eve because our first choice--our neighborhood and destination restaurant Ray's the Steaks--was closed. Michael took 4 days off in row, deservedly, to recover and refresh a bit.)

I think of all the places you mentioned the one that comes the closest to Eve in concept, price point, service and execution is Hugo's in Portland--where I really enjoyed myself last Summer: its number of seats is maybe half that of Eve, but has the chef-driven, modern-leaning stylish cuisine, close farm connection and consciousness, fantastic and fair wine list not quite as good as Todd's, though, where you can have individual dishes sitting at very cool tables at the bar or various multi-course tasting menus in the restaurant--all of which, bar and restaurant is one room about the size of Django maybe in square footage. Hugo's was also the last place beside Eve where I had a killer pork belly dish. But overall your point is valid: DC, for all its wealth, has never been as rich as it should have been with small gems like this or with neighborhood restaurants aiming higher. (There's that n-word again.)

There's a slippery slope when it comes to comparisons with other more established restaurants, and I'm guilty of this too often as well--it can hinder appreciating things just for what they are. But look at the controversy generated in your "other" city when Craig LaBan awarded Django that final bell--how could such a small, unpretentious "neighborhood" byob, with entrees in the mid to high teens, with such a small kitchen and staff, be elevated to the highest ranking? Well, it could because it defied label, it defied category--and at least in LaBan's mind it achieved enough excellence in its own right. Only those with preconceived notions and requirements complained. So when I made my intimacy comments it was irrespective of whoever our dining companions might be--it was solely with respect to service--how the staff teams up to approach you and care for you throughout the evening--and that can function well in big or small house. You're right, Sara, that often the food achieves a certain level of excellence and then it is the intangibles, some of them transparent, that set the lasting mood, tone or remembrance of an experience, at least they do for me. More "experience" or flow and less "dishes that work" or not work viewed in some kind of isolation. That's why I extended that analogy about everything filtering down from chef/owners at the top--you keep your family happy and retain them that loyalty will transfer to the guests in the dining room. You bankrupt restaurants and displace one family or investor after another methinks that too transfers to the guests in your future dining rooms--and impacts how experiences are remembered and whether as a diner you're eager to return.

And I'm not sure about the fetishization angle at least when it comes to DC and the small places, I don't think enough of the media or the public has gotten over the cell-phone-toting/jet-setting celebrity chef angle yet (which way back Phyllis Richman helped to promote) and instead bought into the newer charms and diversity represented well close-in by Ray's, Firefly, Palena, Eve, minibar, Nectar or way out by over-achieving independent places like SBC Cafe or Boulevard Woodgrill. We're inching forward but the vested interests are still well-vested.


Steve Klc

Pastry chef-Restaurant Consultant

Oyamel : Zaytinya : Cafe Atlantico : Jaleo

chef@pastryarts.com

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And I'm not sure about the fetishization angle at least when it comes to DC and the small places, I don't think enough of the media or the public has gotten over the cell-phone-toting/jet-setting celebrity chef angle yet (which way back Phyllis Richman helped to promote) and instead bought into the newer charms and diversity represented well close-in by Ray's, Firefly, Palena, Eve, minibar, Nectar or way out by over-achieving independent places like SBC Cafe or Boulevard Woodgrill. We're inching forward but the vested interests are still well-vested.

Now THIS we agree on. Exactly. Why is it that larger DC doesn't 'get' it yet? The preponderance of corporate credit cards holding us back?


Food is a convenient way for ordinary people to experience extraordinary pleasure, to live it up a bit.

-- William Grimes

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What is the goal of Eve, as seen by the owners?

Thank you all for your informative discussions.

When Meshelle and I first considered opening a Restaurant we wanted to create a special place that we would enjoy frequenting ourselves, one where after a hard day at the office you could casually stop by for a cocktail and a bite at the bar, or if you felt like dinner but didn't want to cook; a casual restaurant serving great food at reasonable prices and for that special occasion a more formal experience. Encompassing all of our favourite restaurant experiences. We, like all of you, have dined and worked in some of the best restaurants in the world, from our experiences we have tried to create a restaurant that includes some of what we thought were great about other restaurants and exclude those that we think are not.

The challenge of all restauranteurs is a difficult one, it is hard to know that your goal in life, perfection, is a fleeting unatainable one, we are human, we err.

Also there is the notion of taste, to one person my rabbit terrine is bland, to another it is a delicate combination of delicious flavours. Some like stiff formal french style of service where we prefer our guests to feel welcome. It is difficult not to take the negative (although welcome) criticism personally but we try to use them to improve. Remember "degustibus non disputandem" that's the beauty of democracy.

Regards and thank you,

Cathal.


Todd Thrasher

The Guy who says YES CHEF and Sometimes makes a cocktail or two.

Restaurant Eve

110 S. Pitt St.

Alexandria, VA 22314

(703) 706-0450

Eamonn's A Dublin Chipper

PX (Upstairs)

728 King Street

Alexandria, VA 22314

(703) 299-8384

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Questions of restaurant metaphysics aside, Eve remains a very, very pleasant place to have lunch at the bar on a day off. You can sample most of the Bistro menu in a leisurely atmosphere far removed from the post-Sietsema dinner scrum. You can get to know Mike, an efficient and affable host who pours generously from an interesting by-the-glass wine list and has been known to rescue stray dogs in his spare time. And you can dine and drink extremely well: starting with an Eggenberger Hopfen Konig, a clean, hoppy pilsner from Austria, moving on to the Maryland Crabcake (actually, cakes -- there are two, both small, dense and delicious) with a nicely-matched South African Chenin Blanc and winding up with the Confit of Pork Belly and a Rhone blend that I can't recall. (Any chance of getting the wine list up on the Web site? Not nagging, just asking.) With the sun peeking through the front window and colheitas winking from behind the bar, it's actually kind of hard to leave until you remember that you've been parked for 1 hour and 58 minutes and the City of Alexandria is about to balance its budget on your windscreen. Next time, Taxi!


"Mine goes off like a rocket." -- Tom Sietsema, Washington Post, Feb. 16.

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Thank you for all the wonderful discussions about our restaurant!

As chef previously stated, we very much welcome all the criticism.

For iamthestretch: the wine list is being worked on and will soon be posted on the website for your enjoyment. If you would like, I can give you a hard copy of our wine list next time you are in and even discuss it.

The Rhone blend is 1996 Chateau Coup Roses Cuvee Vignals from Minervois and it is 50% grenache and 50% syrah.

Again, thank you for all your wonderful comments!


Todd Thrasher

The Guy who says YES CHEF and Sometimes makes a cocktail or two.

Restaurant Eve

110 S. Pitt St.

Alexandria, VA 22314

(703) 706-0450

Eamonn's A Dublin Chipper

PX (Upstairs)

728 King Street

Alexandria, VA 22314

(703) 299-8384

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John W.!!

"Who sang oh Micky?" (Last question on our application.)

And.... Where is Marginal Man now?

Welcome to Town Mr. Kliman...So We can know you better....

Please give me your thoughts ON MY personal favorite,...."Can I bring a cake to the restaurant? "

Be Well. Meshe at Eve.

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John W.!!

"Who sang oh Micky?" (Last question on our application.)

And.... Where is Marginal Man now?

Welcome to Town Mr. Kliman...So We can know you better....

Please give me your thoughts ON MY personal favorite,...."Can I bring a cake to the restaurant? "

Be Well. Meshe at Eve.

Tony Basil.

I actually read something about Marginal Man the other day somewhere. Do you actually ask that? If so, you must only employ ex-1980's skaters. Which would explain the last name of your sommelier/window cleaner.


Firefly Restaurant

Washington, DC

Not the body of a man from earth, not the face of the one you love

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Now THIS we agree on. Exactly. Why is it that larger DC doesn't 'get' it yet? The preponderance of corporate credit cards holding us back?

Amen sister!!!!!!!!


"Ham isn't heroin..." Morgan Spurlock from "Supersize Me"

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We had a quick bite in the bar this evening - the oxtail ravioli, house-cured salmon, and a lovely little dessert with peach granita and white chocolate mousse. I really liked the ravioli - and there hasn't been enough love for the leeks. They were lovely and tender and savory and went perfectly with the beef (which was about as non-stringy as it could have been given that it's oxtail and oxtail is, well, stringy.)

The salmon, which I don't believe anyone's mentioned, was good as well - it's a very light cure, sprinkled with chives and cracked pepper, and served with a small side of slaw and oranges, along with some lovely brown bread. Most people insist on stuffing brown bread full of raisins and caraway seeds, but this was as it should be - plain. The rolls are nice enough, but I'd prefer the brown bread with dinner, although it might be a little too filling.

Dessert was just the right size; a small scoop of peach granita on top of fresh peach slices, along with a white chocolate mousse in a white/milk chocolate cup topped with more peach. Light, fresh, and very good.

I think we'll be back sooner rather than later - lots of other things to try. :biggrin:


"Tea and cake or death! Tea and cake or death! Little Red Cookbook! Little Red Cookbook!" --Eddie Izzard

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One more voice in praise of Eve.

Went with a friend last Saturday night. First, I have to say that getting a reservation is Hard Work - I honestly don't know many eateries here that you have to call on Tuesday to make sure you get in on a Saturday night in the middle of summer. But I sort of knew what I was in for, so no complaints from me!

Now, I have to disclose that I work at the restaurant where Cathal ran the kitchen before he and Meshelle opened Eve, but in a very unimportant capacity (part-time hostess). I don't think this had any role in the quality of food, or the ambience, only in how we were treated :biggrin:

First, I LOVED the decor. Very warm, homey but sophisticated, and soooo cozy. Bar is a bit crowded, but not in an annoying way. Unusual setup of bar with the counter and couches along the wall makes the place feel very social and home-like.

Service was very nice. Now, I am not a high-maintenance diner and I generally like my servers as unnoticeable as possible - tell me about the special, deliver the food, answer a random question and bye-bye. Our guy was very good - on hand when I needed him (not often) and not hovering when I didn't.

Now, the food. I understand now why legends of Cathal are still alive at places he used to work. It's awfully good. I have no claim to expertise in judging food except bits and pieces gleaned in the course of late-night tequila-shootin' with the sous, bu the man is seriously good.

Appetizer was baby beets and goat cheese salad. Anyone who hails from Russia has ideas about beets, mainly about how to avoid it when mommy insists. But this dish was really very good, clean, great ingredients shining through with minimum fuss.

I had my mind made up about entrees before going (I know I know..idle hands with Internet access...will have to think about something to put on timesheet) - pork belly for me. But the duck special sounded too good to pass, so I went for it. So good! Can one make duck medium rare and incredibly tender at the same time? Yes yes, that describes mine. Garnished with a very earthy, garlicky-tasting mushroom (something o'woods?) with no trace of garlick ON it, must be some clever basting technique at work. But now I have to come back for my pork!

Dessert was chocolate mojito - brick-shaped thingie of mousse crossed with flourless cake structure encased in chocolate glaze with mint Jello scattered about. So good. My friend had a peach granita that was quite good, too, I am just not a white chocolate fan.

I can't wait to try the tasting room! Meshelle told me they are going to start "Industry Nights" on Mondays in August - I am officially on a mission to get all kitchen folks from our place to go already. Oh, and she was so very gracious and wonderful to us - stopped by, like, three times in the middle of a Saturday night rush (I know what that's like!) Just a delight to be around. Face it, being cheerful can be very tiring when it's a part of your job description - we've all had these moments at the end of a busy night when you look at your guests and think, oh would y'all just go cluster!@#$ yourselves! But she was grace under pressure personified. Made for a great night for us.


Resident Twizzlebum

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My wife and I had a phenomenal evening in the Tasting Room at Eve on Friday night. However, a little history first.

About 2 weeks ago we attempted to have dinner in the tasting room as part of our anniversary celebration. We had just finished the 1st course of the 9 course tasting menu when we were told that the gas line had been shut off in the neighborhood, which meant that they could not cook anything. We were disappointed, but knew that this was out of the restaurant’s control. The restaurant staff could not have been nicer about the situation – apologizing repeatedly to us and making reservations for us at another restaurant. Oh, they also refused my offer to at least pay for the wonderful half bottle of Robert Sinsky Pinot Blanc that we drank.

A few days later I e-mailed Todd Thrasher to thank the staff for being so accommodating during a hectic time, and to let him know that we will be coming back sometime in the future.

So, Friday night we arrive at Eve, and are greeted with a “welcome back” by the host. While we are waiting for our table, Todd whips up a killer mojito as well as his version of a "Pina Colada", which contained fermented pineapple, candied ginger and a (coconut?) foam.

Once we were seated, we put our wine selection in Todd’s hands, and he certainly did not disappoint. Highlights included the Tablas Creek Esprit de Beaucastel Blanc and the tasty Duckhorn Paraduxx (Cabernet/Zinfandel blend).

The 9 course tasting menu was really about 12-15 courses, if you include the multiple amuse that were served. The 9 course tasting menu was as follows:

-Lobster Crème Brulee with Asparagus and Tarragon Vinaigrette: Lobster puree trapped underneath a caramelized sugar topping. An unusual, but delicious combination, with the salty/tartness of the vinaigrette a nice balance to the sweetness of the lobster and caramelized sugar.

-Duck Foie Gras with Poached Peaches: Our first experience with Foie Gras. This dish was extremely rich, with the peaches helping to cut the heaviness. I enjoyed the first couple of bites, but after awhile it was a little overwhelming.

-Saffron Shellfish “Paella”: Awesome. Filled with lots of seafood, this might have been my favorite dish of the night. The sauce had enough heat to make it tasty, but did not overpower it. Give me a spoon and a big bowl of this paella and I would be a very happy camper.

-Columbia River Salmon with Twice Baked Potato: A mild piece of fish that tasted very fresh. I am not a big fan of salmon, but this was very good.

-Veal Sweet Breads with Summer Corn “Succotash”: This was my wife’s favorite. A generous portion served with a delicious corn medley. Our only complaint about this dish was that it was a bit too salty. However, the sweetness of the corn helped mellow it out.

-Seared Venison Loin with Spinach, Shallots, Morel Custard and Cherries: This rivaled the Paella as my favorite. The venison was very tender and flavorful.

-Oak Grove Farm “Blue Ridge” with Stinging Nettle Soup: The cheese was delicious, and I wound up stealing my wife’s piece, as she was just too full to eat anymore. However, I did not care for the soup, mostly due to the fact that I apparently do not like Stinging Nettle.

-Cantaloupe Soup with Fromage Blanc: This dish could not have come at a better time, as my stomach was pretty full. It was light, refreshing, and delicious.

-“Almonds and Nectarines”: A moist and delicious almond cake with a roasted nectarine that was filled with blackberries. Terrific, and complemented perfectly by a Le Mont Vouvary Chenin Blanc brought out by Todd.

The food just seemed to keep coming and coming with no end in sight. The portions were very generous – my wife had to call it quits after the 6th course, as she literally could not eat another bite of food. The service was every bit as good as the food. I think that every staff member came over to us at some point during dinner to welcome us back to the restaurant and to apologize for the gas outage the last time we were there. Chef Cathal came out to check on us as well. Oh yeah, did I mention that they did not charge us for our food? Both of our 9 course meals were comped because of what happened two weeks ago. This was such an incredibly generous gesture that went WAY beyond what we could have ever expected. Considering all of the courses that you get, the tasting menu is a “bargain” at any price. The wonderful service and spectacular food will definitely bring us back again.


"My cat's breath smells like cat food."

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Oh yeah, did I mention that they did not charge us for our food?

This is one of the most remarkable stories of restaurant generosity I've ever heard. Have you written Tom Sietsema about it?

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Oh yeah, did I mention that they did not charge us for our food?

This is one of the most remarkable stories of restaurant generosity I've ever heard. Have you written Tom Sietsema about it?

Great minds think a like, as I was planning to write to Tom today. My wife and I were blown away by their generosity.


"My cat's breath smells like cat food."

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Oh yeah, did I mention that they did not charge us for our food?

This is one of the most remarkable stories of restaurant generosity I've ever heard. Have you written Tom Sietsema about it?

What is the usual cost on the tasting menu?


peak performance is predicated on proper pan preparation...

-- A.B.

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Oh yeah, did I mention that they did not charge us for our food?

This is one of the most remarkable stories of restaurant generosity I've ever heard. Have you written Tom Sietsema about it?

What is the usual cost on the tasting menu?

The tasting menu is $90 per person.


"My cat's breath smells like cat food."

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Where is Marginal Man now?

Now there's a group I haven't heard in a long time!


(Sitting for lamb chops)

Lamb: Ple-e-e-se Li-i-i-sa I thought you lo-o-o-oved me, lo-o-o-oved me

Marge: Whats Wrong Lisa? Cant get enough lamb chops?

Lisa: I can't eat this, I can't eat a poor little lamb.

Homer: Lisa get a hold yourself, that is lamb, not A lamb.

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QUOTE (Ralph Wiggum @ Aug 3 2004, 11:47 AM)

Oh yeah, did I mention that they did not charge us for our food? 

This is one of the most remarkable stories of restaurant generosity I've ever heard. Have you written Tom Sietsema about it?

This is amazing, but it is certainly in keeping with the experiences we have had at Eve. Two recent anecdotes (admittedly not as remarkable as Ralph's, but I think telling in their own way): 1) We have eaten quite a bit in the Bistro, but have never been able to do the Tasting Room. We finally got a wife approved baby sitter lined up (mother-in-law flying up from Florida :laugh: ) so I called to make reservations for the 7th of August (wife's birthday). Unfortunately, the restaurant is closed the first week in August. After apologizing profusely, Meshelle asks me if I would like her to get us in somewhere else Saturday night. So she e-mails me back with reservations for Maestro, assuring me she has spoken with the manager and we will be "taken care of". 2) I was in the bar for a quick lunch last Friday and the chef came out and started talking with a few of us. He found out I had never had guinea hen (not sure I remember how we got to that point in the conversation) and he was adamant we come in that night to try it (he was doing it in the Tasting Room). I was hesitant, since we dine there quite a bit with our daughter, but only on weeknights, early. But he was sincere and insistent; what came across was the very real desire to share something wonderful. (Like when I found out my wife had never seen "Casablanca.") So we showed up at 1730. Chef sent out crabcakes and then a sensational saddle of venison and the guinea hen (done as a ballontine, mmmm), plus the fettucini with butter and parmesan they always make for Lily, our daughter. Lily loved the guinea hen and the venison as well, though I'm not yet ready to tell a three year old she ate Bambi. All was wonderful, and finished off with a chocolate passion fruit bombe from the tasting room menu. You can't fake soul, and Eve has it; it shows in the food and it shows in the service.


Tony

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A couple of things:

One evening last week I was sitting at the bar at Restaurant Eve and one the staff brings out this plate of what looks like some fried little fish things. He asks the bartender who they are for and it turns out that one of the bartenders was having for his dinner a plate of the fried fresh sardines that was one of the specials that evening, so they set them on the counter behind the bar for "Ken" to have (he has stepped away for a monemt). A couple of minutes later, Chef Cathal comes out and he is craning his neck to see who ordered the sardines. One of the bartenders points to the plate sitting behind the bar and says "Ken" is having them. The chef says no, no no, give them to my friend here (me). Well, my only experience with sardines is with the tins you get at the store that you have to use a key to wind off the lid. It hard to resist when the chef who prepared the sardines is standing right next to you waiting for your reaction. Well, these were nothing like what I was expecting and they were delicious. Lightly fried with just a hint of batter and drizzled with a garlic aioli. "Ken" comes back and gives me the hairy eyeball when he sees me eating his dinner. Not to worry, they brought him some more.

After a few minutes, the bar filled up and everybody at the bar started ordering the fried fresh sardines. The guy sitting next to me had two orders. It turns out that the folks sitting at the bar ate all they had and no one eating in the restaurant got to have them.

The moral of that story is: if you are in Restauant Eve and they have the sardines on the specials menu that evening, order them you will not be disappointed.

Next: Last Friday evening I was sitting at the bar again (I seem to be doing a lot of that lately) and I get a strong whiff of basil. I said what is the basil odor that I smell. Well Todd Thrasher happened to be making some drink that he was serving in a martini glass that looked sort of purple/pink. Todd had made some sort of drink with purple basil and he poured the left-over from the shaker into a shot glass for me to sample. Totally unexpected, a very basily drink, and very good.

Last: New menu. Need to get down there to try some of the new stuff. H'mm, perhaps another trip the bar is in order this evening.

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Next: Last Friday evening I was sitting at the bar again (I seem to be doing a lot of that lately) and I get a strong whiff of basil. I said what is the basil odor that I smell. Well Todd Thrasher happened to be making some drink that he was serving in a martini glass that looked sort of purple/pink. Todd had made some sort of drink with purple basil and he poured the left-over from the shaker into a shot glass for me to sample. Totally unexpected, a very basily drink, and very good.

O dear. I'm being taken back to Eve for my birthday Monday. I think I'll have to make one of those a present to myself.

Awesome.


A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

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Next:  Last Friday evening I was sitting at the bar again (I seem to be doing a lot of that lately) and I get a strong whiff of basil.  I said what is the basil odor that I smell.  Well Todd Thrasher happened to be making some drink that he was serving in a martini glass that looked sort of purple/pink.  Todd had made some sort of drink with purple basil and he poured the left-over from the shaker into a shot glass for me to sample.  Totally unexpected, a very basily drink, and very good.

O dear. I'm being taken back to Eve for my birthday Monday. I think I'll have to make one of those a present to myself.

Awesome.

Oh no. News flash. Todd has been thinking overtime. Ask for the Restaurant Eve Special Magic drink. It changes flavors half way through (no layers). No kidding, it changes from sour to sweet. Amazing.

PS: The new braised lamb shank is unbelievable, as is the mushroom risotto side dish.

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I'm excited to go back to Eve no matter what, but now I'm thrilled. My darlin' just got us reservations in the Tasting Room for Monday night -- apparently the Tasting Room's a 6 days-a-week affair now.

I'm already salivating.


A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

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nothing really new to add, other than i concur with the remarks most of you all have made.

i treated myself to a solo lunch this afternoon at restaurant eve bistro.

first off, i love the room itself with the verneer and skylighted ceiling.

the food was delicious and i look forward to going back again for a dinner, i dare say.

started with a terrine of wild birds (duck, quail, pheasant, and my most favorite bird....pork) served with poached, dried apricots and brioche batons...

had a very homey potato crusted cod with a stew of tomatoes, olives, garlic and artichokes, served with an aioli...i am ashamed to say i licked my bowl clean. very flavorful, and clean dish.

drank a nice riesling from alsace during the two courses and finished with some coffee.


Edited by pastramionrye (log)

Nothing quite like a meal with my beautiful wife.

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