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Felice

La Table de Joël Robuchon

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I was just reading in the Figaro that Joel Robuchon has taken over Seize au seize in the 16th to open a second restaurant called La Table de Robuchon. The article says that it's opening in the begining of May, so it's either open or about to. And unlike L' Atelier, they take reservations. Here's the blurb from Le Figaro:

Bonne nouvelle pour les déçus et les éconduits, la deuxième adresse de Joël Robuchon va ouvrir début mai, en lieu et place du Seize au seize (16, avenue Bugeaud, 01.56.28.16.16) avec le chef Frédéric Simonin qui vient d’avoir une étoile au Michelin. L’esprit contemporain devrait présider à cette table traditionnelle. Car non seulement on pourra s’attabler à la Table de Joël Robuchon (c’est le nom du restaurant), réserver au téléphone et la porte ouvrira de l’extérieur. Si la vie n’est pas belle !


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I made a reservation at Seize au Seize a few weeks ago for dinner on May 26th. I was very, very confused when I discovered I was in fact calling (or reserving at) La Table de Joel Robuchon since I could find no mention of such a restaurant existing in any guidebook or on this site.

While I'm disappointed to have missed the 'old' Seize au Seize, it sounded excellent, I'm excited to have a first dining experience chez Joel since I never made it to Jamin or any of his other places.

I'll post a capsule of my experience when I return in June.

Thanks,

Ben

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Actually, this was already reported by moi-meme some months back, but I neglect which thread it was in...they actually opened a few days ago, and I haven't any feedback yet, although I do know the full kicthen (mostly from Le Cinq)


Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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It is the exact same menu as L'Atelier, only you don't have to sit at a bar to consume it. It isn't to be considered fine dining, but more akin to bistro dining.

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It's not a "fine-ding" restaurant, but I have spoken with their management who informed me that they are looking for a second Michelin star (they already have one, the same team being in place since the restaurant was called the "Seize au Seize")


Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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It's not a "fine-ding" restaurant, but I have spoken with their management who informed me that they are looking for a second Michelin star (they already have one, the same team being in place since the restaurant was called the "Seize au Seize")

If it's the same team, I would think a second star is well within their sights.

Come to think of it, what about Atelier isn't fine dining? food wise that is.

the quality is there.


A meal without wine is... well, erm, what is that like?

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All-

I ate at La Table for dinner on May 27th with my wife, father, and mother. My parents, who were on their way back to North America after two weeks in Spain (and a lot of good meals in San Sebastian and elsewhere) thought it was the meal of their trip. I thought it was wonderful as well.

In the old Seize au Seize space, it's off the beaten track. The crowd was well heeled, well dressed, wealthy, and neighborhoody. We were the only non-French in the place. While the menu was mostly identical to that at the Atelier, there were some different items as well. And the experience was a traditional one as opposed to sushi bar cum haute French dining that characterizes the Atelier. And despite two meals at the Atlelier already under my belt, there was lots of new stuff to try.

The service was exceedingly warm and the atmosphere was genuinely convivial, a rarity in your upper strata restaurants.

Rather than give you the lurid Penthouse Forum version of what we ate, morsel by morsel, here are the highlights.

The langoustines with basil, also available at the Atelier, were served as an amuse. They're sublime. Our other amuse was a foie gras mousse in a martini glass, topped with a truffle froth. It was excellent as well. The crab and avocado appetizer was good. The gazpacho was identical to the soup at the Aterlier, and equally excellent. For main courses, the duckling and the quail (also from the Atelier) were terrific. The dish of the night, however, was the fried fish my wife ordered. I’ve never seen fish presented this way. The insides had been butterflied but the head and spine were intact, and just the butteflied filet had been breaded and fried, then served with a herbed butter. All the mains came with the famous Robuchon potatoes, which, if you haven’t tried them, are basically a delivery vehicle for butter.

By the way, I made Robuchon’s potatoes at home once and they were very good. I’m pleased to report his are better.

The wine list was small but well chosen and the sommelier very friendly and willing to steer us to lesser known wines. We had a bottle of Billecart Salmon rose to start, and the a Bordeaux (the second bottling of Chateau L’Angelus, I think. The name eludes me now).

Why go to the Table when you can eat at the same food at the Atelier in a more convenient location and for slightly less money? Well, it’s a totally different dining experience, one of the best of my trip.

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I noted in the "Digest" a bit back that

Joel Robuchon’s post-rentree “Club” menu (starter, fish or meat, cheese, dessert, coffee and a ½ bottle of wine for 55E) at La Table de…., 16, avenue Bugeaud in the 16th, 01.56.28.16.16, open everyday – the choices are quite interesting sounding, e.g., sautéed girolles with apricot jam and slices of ham, calamari with tastes of paella, and a “pseudo-bouillabaisse” (whose ingredients sound like the real thing to me).

Well, it is nice to have another restaurant, Thierry Burlot + Alain Senderens being the other most notable places, offer more reasonable menus or prices after several years of success at higher levels. Four of us dined there the other day and had the wonderful amuse-gueule of tabouli on top of avocado; firsts of sauteed girolles and herring; mains of male and female ducking (canette and canneton), calamari and the bouillabaisse (no longer confusing called false); nice but chilly cheese, a fine red Bordeaux, and saving the best til last; great desserts of peches de vigne and figs with ice cream. The bill was an easy 99.50 E for each couple.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I noted in the "Digest" a bit back that
Joel Robuchon’s post-rentree “Club” menu (starter, fish or meat, cheese, dessert, coffee and a ½ bottle of wine for 55E) at La Table de…., 16, avenue Bugeaud in the 16th, 01.56.28.16.16, open everyday – the choices are quite interesting sounding, e.g., sautéed girolles with apricot jam and slices of ham, calamari with tastes of paella, and a “pseudo-bouillabaisse” (whose ingredients sound like the real thing to me).

Well, it is nice to have another restaurant, Thierry Burlot + Alain Senderens being the other most notable places, offer more reasonable menus or prices after several years of success at higher levels. Four of us dined there the other day and had the wonderful amuse-gueule of tabouli on top of avocado; firsts of sauteed girolles and herring; mains of male and female ducking (canette and canneton), calamari and the bouillabaisse (no longer confusing called false); nice but chilly cheese, a fine red Bordeaux, and saving the best til last; great desserts of peches de vigne and figs with ice cream. The bill was an easy 99.50 E for each couple.

John, I am confused here. Did you dine at Le Club de JR or one of the other two? And if so, how was the bill 99.50 per couple if the menu is 55 per person?

Thank you for always posting prices, it helps immensely.


Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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John, I am confused here. Did you dine at Le Club de JR or one of the other two? And if so, how was the bill 99.50 per couple if the menu is 55 per person?

Thank you for always posting prices, it helps immensely.

Sorry. The restaurant is the Table de Joel Robuchon, 16, ave Bugeaud in the 16th (from whence came its prior name Seize au Seize), 01.56.28.16.16, open everyday, and it used to run one 100 E per person a la carte. A few weeks ago, they introduced a "club menu" which costs 55 E per person with wine and coffee. The way we got out at less than 100 E per couple was that one of us ordered only one dish (as she traditionally does) so if you invite her to join you, you'll get out for less than 55 E, otherwise count on 110 E per couple.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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