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Trip to London Indian restaurants


prasad2
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City of London is one my favorites for dining INDIAN besides of course India and US and especially Amma in New York.

I am the chef/owner of the restuarant THALI. Here is My Webpage. We are about 40 miles North of New York in NEw Canaan, Connecticut.

Last summer I had the pleasure of meeting Iqbal Wahib owner of Cinnanmon Club UK and since then I couldn't wait to go to London.

Starting Nov 24th I should be staying in Chelsea (Central London, I guess) for about seven days.

I definetely plan on visiting several restaurants like, Cinnanmon Club, Zaika, Veeraswamy, Tamarind, Benares, Chutney Mary, Le Port De Indes, Nobu. (Bombay Braserie..not sure)

Any other suggestions please ! and any cuisine is most welcome.

I am there for a reason.... to eat .... to learn... to get inspired. Food is important but also like to check trends.

What I really like to do is to spend a day or two in a couple of restaurant kitchens and I shall reciprocate in a similar way if any one is interested in my kitchen.

May be as a guest chef? May be just to watch the kitchen in action? or may be even to chop some tomatoes or onions.

Thanks a million and looking forward for the culinary trip and your help with connections and influence with some of the fine restaurants in UK.

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Have not been to London's Indian places but have heard good things about Cafe Namaste Spice and Red Fort besides the ones on your list. You might also want to check out the Balti houses of the Indian/ Pak sector, Birmingham I belive its called.

Of course you should have kept your mouth shut as now you will have to give a full report.

Anway have fun

bhasin

Ps would love to chop onions in your kitchen!

Bombay Curry Company

3110 Mount Vernon Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22305. 703. 836-6363

Delhi Club

Arlington, Virginia

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Prasad2

If i were you i would absolutely make sure that Southall Broadway and Ealing Road are a major part of my iternary. Most of the places are no gimmicks places but good food certainly does make up for it, and do not forget there are some pubs serving the most delectable Indian fare, I really enjoyed the food at Glassy Junction in Southall, best part of the experience, if you have any Rupees they take Rupees too.

As far as consistency in food goes my favorite place is Monty's on Ealing Broadway for a slightly nicer restaurant. Let me know if i can be of any further help.

"Burgundy makes you think of silly things, Bordeaux

makes you talk about them, and Champagne makes you do them." Brillat-Savarin

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I definetely plan on visiting several restaurants like, Cinnanmon Club, Zaika, Veeraswamy, Tamarind, Benares, Chutney Mary, Le Port De Indes, Nobu. (Bombay Braserie..not sure)

If you like Contemporary Japanese and are going to try Nobu's, you should check out Zuma, the hottest new restaurant at Knightsbridge. Arguably better than Nobu, but then I may be biased because I'm Indian, more specifically Sindhi.(warning this is a loaded statement !)

Edited by Episure (log)

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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Have not been to London's Indian places but have heard good things about Cafe Namaste Spice and Red Fort besides the ones on your list. You might also want to check out the Balti houses of the Indian/ Pak sector, Birmingham I belive its called.

Of course you should have kept your mouth shut as now you will have to give a full report.

Anway have fun

bhasin

Ps would love to chop onions in your kitchen!

Bhasin: What are you talking about? You Know you are always welcome in my kitchen. We learn new everyday, even if it the simplest thing.

Shall try Cafe Namaste Spice. Red Fort I had tried it the last time. Will give a good try to get to the Balti houses, I am traveling alone, so there is only so much I can eat.

I know I should have kept my mouth shut. On the other hand I am looking for influentual people of the egullet team to Introduce me to the local owners/chefs and share our strenths. I know I am willing to. Rest be assured as soon as I get back I shall post all the happenings I went thru.

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Prasad2:

I agree that some of the best Indaina restaurants in the world are in London. My favorite in the Chelsea area is Vama. The food is absolutely delicious.

Peppertrail

Peppertrail:

I did hear the name Vama and I shall get there. Are there any favorite foods you like it there or are they known for anything special foods?

Thanks

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Prasad2

If i were you i would absolutely make sure that Southall Broadway and Ealing Road are a major part of my iternary. I really enjoyed the food at Glassy Junction in Southall,.

As far as consistency in food goes my favorite place is Monty's on Ealing Broadway for a slightly nicer restaurant. Let me know if i can be of any further help.

Thanks M65:

I remember one restaurant in southall. I know the food is good and real straight food with limited choices. I also remember you could order entrees like Karai and balti and dum pukht for groups of four, six, eight or more. So you end up with one dish but with many assorted rotis. I am going solo, so let me see what I can do but will definetely try to get to one of the pubs in southhall. AS far as rupees, I have to dig my moms purse.

Monty's on Ealing Broadway.. how far is it from Chelsea...

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I think prasad you should post this in the UK list, just in case the resident bongs like Majumdar Brothers are still around :biggrin:

Anil:

I did post it in the UK list and I am still trying to pull some strings to get into some kitchens. Honestly I love working all the time, hence vaccation for me would be more of a pleasure if I can get into a kitchen. Now Mujumdar brothers have not yet seen the thread I guess and may be Andy Lynes the forum leader may get back to us. Who knows?/ :raz::wink::wink:

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I did hear the name Vama and I shall get there. Are there any favorite foods you like it there or are they known for anything special foods?

Vama serves northwest Indian dishes. They were also offering cooking classes at the time I visited. That was a couple of years ago. The one dish I remember most is their Karari bhindi Vama style – batter dipped and fried okra seasoned with amchur, red chili powder and chaat masala. Chicken in peppercorn sauce was another dish I remember. Food is rated 25 by Zagat survey.

Peppertrail

Ammini Ramachandran

www.Peppertrail.com

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Mela on Shaftesbury Avenue.

Thanks Blondie:

I have heard about Mela as well and shall get there and let you know motre about it. Are they known for any specialty foods? :wub:

We had a terrible experience at Mela. Not only was the food awful on the day we were there.. the staff was extremely rude and impolite

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Mela on Shaftesbury Avenue.

Thanks Blondie:

I have heard about Mela as well and shall get there and let you know motre about it. Are they known for any specialty foods? :wub:

We had a terrible experience at Mela. Not only was the food awful on the day we were there.. the staff was extremely rude and impolite

Thanks Monica:

That seems like the double X on the game price is right. Should we a seccond or a third chance.

Monica: How was the ambience. I know you said the food neither the service was good. Any thing to look for?

Thanks again

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Monica's experience is more recent than mine, so maybe Mela's not as good as it was. She's also in a better position to advise you as your standards for Indian food are undoubtedly higher than mine. So I defer to Monica's opinion, but personally I would consider stopping back on my next trip as I really enjoyed my meal there :smile:

Sometimes When You Are Right, You Can Still Be Wrong. ~De La Vega

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I shall check out Zuma. Now again how far is Knightsbridge from Chelsea. Why is Zuma better than Nobu and specifically Sindhi. Explain the statement please, at least I did not get it and I have already had three black labels today!!!

Thanks

Disclaimer: I've nothing to do with restaurant or it's owners. As part of my ongoing research I've been following their progress as it is a classic example of a good cuisine big budget restaurant+ PR Machinery+ Buzz( though there are many Nobu loyals who would disagree about the food part).

Excerpts from various sources-

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As trendy newcomer to the Knightsbridge dining scene, Zuma wins high marks creating a harmonious offering of cuisine, crowd, and character. Prices reflect a fairly deep discount from its most direct rival, but does it aim to compete with Nobu for top Japanese in London?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------London's most chic celebrity restaurant, Zuma, is going smokefree. Favoured by actors, pop stars and footballers, Zuma is to introduce its smokefree policy next week.

The restaurant made the decision after taking soundings from regular patrons who include Kylie Minogue, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jodie Kidd, Sir Elton John, Westlife, Freddie Ljungberg and Guy Ritchie.

"My personal opinion is we won't lose customers, but you never know what will happen," said Rainer Becker, chef and co-owner of the Knightsbridge restaurant. "If you are eating sushi or sashimi and someone is smoking at the next table, it will destroy your dining experience. Nuances of taste and aroma are far more noticeable when the air, and your taste buds, are clear of smoke."

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

When Indian caterer Divia Lalvani and German chef Rainer Becker teamed up in Knightsbridge last year to create the Japanese restaurant Zuma, their hybrid enterprise quickly garnered serious buzz. Celebrated Japanese designer Takashi Sugimoto's company crafted several distinct environments: The main room separates the hurly-burly at the long granite sushi bar from the large lounge in front—where you'll spend plenty of time watching the glitterati while waiting for a spot at the first come, first served sushi bar. The wait pays off: Standouts include a wide variety of maki rolls and sushi, charcoal robata grill dishes such as rib eye steak with daikon-ponzu sauce, and Hokkaido king crab with lime. Chawan mushi dessert, with mango, papaya, and a sort of crème brûlée at the bottom, makes for a sweet finish (entrées, $11-$73).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

It might not quite be on the scale of the recent Goldsmith-Rothschild "merger'', but the coming together of two of the London restaurant scene's brightest young things is none the less intriguing foodies.

For chocolate heir Joel Cadbury is stepping out with Divia Lalvani, the elegant multinational lass who launched the massively successful Japanese restaurant Zuma, before selling out for a seven-figure sum earlier this year.

Edited by Episure (log)

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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Prasad, it might be a good idea to check out the websites of all the restaurant suggestions you have and shortlist them into a doable list as thereis only so much you can eat in a week. Bring back frozen dinners from Marks & Spencers the qualitly is surprisingly good, sepecially the chicken tikka masalla, to try later.

Bombay Curry Company

3110 Mount Vernon Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22305. 703. 836-6363

Delhi Club

Arlington, Virginia

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Now Sabras in Willesden Green, NW 10.. how far from Chelsea?

Thanks

Other side of London (north west). About an hour by tube to Dollis Hill Station. Next to the end of the No 52 bus route, which mighrt be the best way to get there from Kensington.

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