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cabrales

Poulet en vessie

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Hi, John:

I'd appreciate knowing whether you have had any poulet/poularde en vessie samplings or other observations since your discussion of the topic in your book.

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This question refers to my writing about my adventures poaching chicken, beef, and lamb (mostly) in Reynolds cooking bags, using these as a substitute for the traditional bladder. This allows you to poach meat without worrying about cooking it dry, and so permits you to add little or no liquid if you wish. You put the meat in the bag, tie it, and put it into a pot with water raised to a bare simmer, and leave it there for three (chicken) or four (beef short ribs) hours. The result is very tender meat surrounded by very flavorful juices, with the scum that you would usually skim away adhering to the sides of the bag. My pursuits of this nature have more or less come to an end with the disappearance of the small-size Reynolds cooking bag from my supermarket shelves. (I think the small one are actually called "medium" size.) Obviously, the large size ones can be used but they're much too big and cost too much. I've tried using the microwave-ready food storage bags with some success, but essentially this is something I don't do nearly as much as I used to. I'm not sure this answers your question: if not, prod me some more.

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John -- Thanks for the response. :wink:

Poaching in plastic bags is an interesting technique. It has even been applied to eggs by Elena Arzak in Spain, in her egg flower with dates dish. She places a bit of white truffle oil in the poaching sac.

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In a somewhat related theme, using the paper-bag method of cooking pasta brings out the aroma and flavor of white truffle oil in a spectacular way.

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John -- Could you discuss your implementation of the paper bag method? (Apologies that I do not know what that method entails)

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