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heidih

Your egg journey

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Eggs -  a miracle that we take for granted, sometimes drool over as egg porn. feared nutritionally for a while; the list goes on. 

I needed a hit of protein in a soup today  and meant to do egg drop style but the phone rang, I turned the burner off, and returned to a lightly creamy and simple enriched broth. When I started cooking from Julia Child long ago eggs took am important role. One's first quiche, eggs as enrichment, souffle - long long list. And then forays into other countries - tea eggs, baked whole in shell, in flavorful saucy bakes, eggs and tomatoes in a quicky wok pass. 

 

So...I ask - your most stellar egg forays recently or as standards.?  I live in the land of Eggslut = Alvin Cailan) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eggs  An older topic as inspiration  https://forums.egullet.org/topic/147288-the-egg-thread/

 

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In the past few months I've allowed myself more eggs. I like a small omelet with a little Oaxaca melting cheese and it gives me the chance to use an old well seasoned carbon steel omelet pan. Another new dish (to me) is the simple Chinese staple of wok fried egg and tomato that @heidih mentions above. In a pinch it even satisfies when the tomatoes are less than perfect, like now, during the winter. Over rice it proves just about the easiest two-ingredient meal, not including condiments. And since the revelation of the Kenji hard boiled egg steaming routine we eat more whole peeled eggs. The steaming method not only allows the eggs to be smoothly peeled, but I also find it easier to control how the yolk is cooked.

 

Finally, if you have a few left over shreds of lox (happens rarely), there's always a lox omelet to look forward to. I too love a little egg drop soup, especially if I am sick. Good chicken stock and rice or noodles and a drizzle of egg is makes me feel a little less sorry for myself. I feel a lot less sorry for myself if I can get my husband to make it under those circumstances. 

 

I am not one of those people who swoon over runny yolk egg porn. Forget fried, poached or anything with a giant wobbly yellow globe. I don't even look at the breakfast thread here until later in the day. Oozing on my plate makes we woozy. 

 

 

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43 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

Forget fried, poached or anything with a giant wobbly yellow globe. 

 

I like a runny yolk.  What I can't stand are the runny whites that look like snot.

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1 minute ago, ElsieD said:

 

I like a runny yolk.  What I can't stand are the runny whites that look like snot.


OMG...nothing’s less appetizing!

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I forgot about baked eggs in muffin tins. Just the egg in a greased tin. They were then set on creamed spinach  for Holy Thursday. I've never made them in adulthood. I love love creamed spinach so see ya in the spring with an update. I know that is not what Green Thursday is derived from but how we did it.

 

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ye olde standards - cheese (and other) souffle and keeshees...

 

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My very favorite breakfast splurge at home is a breakfast casserole-of-a-sort in a round ramekin, about 3 inches deep.

 

Layer 1: cheese grits, spread evenly, with an indentation in the center

Layer 2: egg or two in the indention (not being a big egg white fan, I'll often use one egg and one egg yolk)

Layer 3: a sprinkle of ground ham or chopped bacon or browned sausage

Layer 4: a thin covering of Vivian Howard's stewed tomatoes (I canned a bunch, sans the bread crumbs; awfully handy)

Layer 5: grated cheese, whatever I happen to have on hand

 

Into the CSO, steam bake at 350 for about 10-12 minutes. White is done, yolk is runny.

 

I'm also fond of ham and potato croquettes filling in for the English muffin in eggs Benedict. 

 

And a breakfast quesadilla featuring corn tortillas, scrambled eggs, some cheese and maybe some scrambled up chorizo if I have it on hand is awfully good.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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I skipped lunch yesterday and was starving by evening and of course nothing appealed. Toasted some no-knead, dished up some quick-pickled beets, and made a very simple egg salad. Just not too hard boiled eggs roughly chopped and mixed with paprika, S & P, Dijon, and mayo. Total comfort. I never had egg salad until last  year of college when a Texan made it for a quick lunch. She did not cook much but this she could handle (and well). As I recall she used dry mustard but I was out. 

 

Oh we did get scrambled egg sandwiches - just and egg - no dressing) for school lunches. Bit smelly by noon. Melissa Clark tells the story of trying to achieve a   signature lunch sandwich like Harriet the Spy's tomato one. She chose egg salad. The day there was no frozen juice can in her bag - you can imagine. Haz-Mat needed for her locker.


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Until I ran across it somewhere on the Intertubes, I had no idea that Starbucks Egg Bites was a thing. It's basically eggs plus cottage cheese plus your choice of ingredients. Ms. Alex thought they'd be great to take to work for a quick snack or lunch. After a bit of online research, I found this promising Instant Pot recipe and this Instant Pot mold. I made my first batch yesterday, using Swiss cheese, roasted red pepper, baby greens, and touch of salt and white pepper. Ms. Alex proclaimed it a winner.

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Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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14 minutes ago, Alex said:

Until I ran across it somewhere on the Intertubes, I had no idea that Starbucks Egg Bites was a thing. I

 

My friend had them yesterday. They gave her a fork and i said I thought they were portable breakfast - use your hands. A nice protein choice versus sugar laden muffins. Nice she likes them - endless options. 

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I made egg bites a couple of times this summer using guidance from Anova's Sous Vide Egg Bites article and links. They were delicious: a major hit in our household! Only problem with them was that we ate them too quickly to have any left for work the following week. I guess I needed to make bigger batches. :D 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Popping in to say I had to google 'Eggslut' thinking I was reading the pronunciation wrong and it was some fancy gourmet thing I hadn't heard of. 

 

Nope. It is what it is. And I love it. 😂

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14 hours ago, Alex said:

Until I ran across it somewhere on the Intertubes, I had no idea that Starbucks Egg Bites was a thing. It's basically eggs plus cottage cheese plus your choice of ingredients.

 

Something similar is available at Tim Horton's as well here in Canada, under the name "omelet bites." My GF's had them occasionally when keto-ing. No cottage cheese in this case. One version has whole eggs with bacon and cheese, the other is egg whites with spinach and cheese.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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4 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Your egg journey ain't over till you sample some lovely 皮蛋 (pí dàn) or century eggs, here with chilli.

 

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That egg's been on a journey, alright.

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5 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Your egg journey ain't over till you sample some lovely 皮蛋 (pí dàn) or century eggs, here with chilli.

 

 

I see them in the stores. I will give it a go someday. Balut however I can't wrap my head around. 

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Looking for something in an old dresser I found these blown out eggs. As a kid we did that, painted them and used on an "Easter Tree". I think these did not get painted cuz the holes were unacceptably large - shell hard as a rock I guess.  They are 3" end to end. We never had geese so they must be from the Pekin ducks (45 years ago!)  We would find the eggs as we herded them into their night shelter.  There was an unspoken understanding that we did not eat them. Where did they go? Pretty sure into baked goods and such. Mom did boil once and we ran outside to spit. Stronger than what we were used to. However I checked around and Whole Foods and some of the other upscales carry them. Oddly Asian markets do not from my brief research and observations. The chicken egg vendors at the closer farmers markets do not raise ducks. So duck eggs are on the forward trial agenda. I've seen @liuzhou and @Anna N use them. Any others?

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I had access to duck eggs at a farmers' market for a few summers. I enjoyed using them for omelettes and probably quiches. It's been 6 years since the last time, so I probably can't remember everything I did with them. My sister and I enjoyed their extra richness and size.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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16 minutes ago, Smithy said:

I had access to duck eggs at a farmers' market for a few summers. I enjoyed using them for omelettes and probably quiches. It's been 6 years since the last time, so I probably can't remember everything I did with them. My sister and I enjoyed their extra richness and size.

 

So just more oomph but not funk? I have spoken to people who to expect a note more like an aged runny cheese or a blue. We build things up in our minds often with no factual or experiencial basis

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4 minutes ago, heidih said:

 

So just more oomph but not funk? I have spoken to people who to expect a note more like an aged runny cheese or a blue. We build things up in our minds often with no factual or experiencial basis

 

Yes to more oomph. I don't remember any funk. Neither my sister nor I is especially fond of stinky cheeses, and we didn't notice a resemblance.

 

I was disappointed the year our local chicken-raiser decided to stop raising ducks and selling their eggs. He said the ducks were so aggressive that they drove the poor chickens to distraction and hurt the hens' laying ability. He said he was never so happy to slaughter livestock as when he finished those ducks! But I was disappointed not to have access to the eggs any more.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Oh yes -we had them together in a big area but with a rooster to "mediate".  Cocksure literally. Major spurs. 

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A friend invited us over for breakfast one day, a number of years ago.  He had duck eggs and ostrich eggs on offer.  I had an ostrich egg which I could not finish.  They weight about 3 pounds each.  John ate duck eggs.  They were both really good.  It was quite a job cracking the ostrich shell.  It's not unlike trying to crack a rock.  I believe he eventually cracked it using a hammer.

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44 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

A friend invited us over for breakfast one day, a number of years ago.  He had duck eggs and ostrich eggs on offer.  I had an ostrich egg which I could not finish.  They weight about 3 pounds each.  John ate duck eggs.  They were both really good.  It was quite a job cracking the ostrich shell.  It's not unlike trying to crack a rock.  I believe he eventually cracked it using a hammer.

 

I can believe the ostrich eggshells were tough. I've seen South African serverware (salad servers and serving trays, for instance) made from wood with ostrich eggshell inlays. Beautiful stuff. It looks as tough as mother-of-pearl.

 

As for the ostrich eggs to eat - I've read one can feed several people!


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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10 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

I can believe the ostrich eggshells were tough. I've seen South African serverware (salad servers and serving trays, for instance) made from wood with ostrich eggshell inlays. Beautiful stuff. It looks as tough as mother-of-pearl.

 

As for the ostrich eggs to eat - I've read one can feed several people!

 

An ostrich eggs equates to 24 chicken eggs.  

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