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eugenep

how to choose best green coffee beans

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I was always confused about the description and just knew the difference between arabica and robusta but not much else in selecting green beans. 

 

But found out, from experience and more youtubing and reading: 

 

(1) the different varieties of arabica matter and some taste better than others: e.g., typica is better than caturra 

 

(2) bigger beans within the same variety means the bean was ripe when picked so pick the bigger beans for better flavor. The ratings AAA, AA or AB means the size of the beans with the AAA meaning biggest ripest and better 

 

from the above two I confirmed from experience 

 

another that I haven't really tested/noticed is 

 

(3) method of washing or fermenting beans matters to taste in African beans

 

(4) beans from different regions have a different taste profile 

 

I still don't know if 3 and 4 is true or not. I've been buying from only Invalsa (specializes in Bolivian beans) but maybe I should try Sweet Marias to test for 3 and 4? 

 

Please let me know if you disagree, have other resources, or different standards to add or if some of the above or myths etc

 

 

 

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Define "best". You need to figure out what you like.  Generally anything offered by a specialty green coffee seller is going to be far above the commodity grade stuff where "is it robusta", "does it taste bad" are not questions that should be on the radar.  The importers do cuppings and only things without appreciable faults get bid on.  Whether you _like_ the flavor of a typical Sumatra or Costa Rica coffee is another question. 


Edited by cdh (log)

Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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55 minutes ago, cdh said:

Define "best". You need to figure out what you like.  Generally anything offered by a specialty green coffee seller is going to far above the commodity grade stuff where "is it robusta", "does it taste bad" are not questions that should be on the radar.  The importers do cuppings and only things without appreciable faults get bid on.  Whether you _like_ the flavor of a typical Sumatra or Costa Rica coffee is another question. 

yeah. i thought about that too.

 

who is to say that typica is better that cattura and best is subjective like art and taste judgments 

 

but it looks like it was categorized in a hierarchy of taste and quality by this website https://varieties.worldcoffeeresearch.org/varieties (first upper left tab will filter by quality) 

 

 it does make sense to have a best or better than hierarchy for the following analogy: 

 

in wine, if wine grapes are grown very densely per plot of land to yield the most grapes, then the yield will go up but wine quality will go down 

 

i'm guessing it becomes more watered down in taste and - supposedly - the best burgundies, romanee conti etc., do not plant that much to keep quality up 

 

Now - to the point. Caturra was a hybrid of typica but caturra is different in that the yield is much more per planting. So you end up planting more and getting higher yields 

 

if the yield is higher per plot of land, and if it's like wine grapes, the quality could go down 

 

so a best or better than hierarchy could exist in coffee beans as well if it's similar to wine grapes 

 

 

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That looks like an agricultural recommendation.  It's like a chart that says Riesling is a great wine grape when planted beside rivers.  Fine as far as it goes, but misleading in the extreme if you expect exceptional wine when Riesling vines are planted next to the Cuyahoga.  


Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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Taste is Personal , nothing more , nor anything less.

 

Ive been getting green beans from Sweet Maria's for 18 years.

 

Ive never been disappointed and leave all the work of traveling , local tasting , and transshipment to Tom , @ SM

 

he has a consistent way of describing the green beans , initially it looks a bit complicated 

 

but once you get the general idea , you can order from this w a certain confidence.

 

and I don't work for them etc 

 

roasting level matters a lot w what ever green beans you get

 

I prefer darker roasts , and the darker you roast , the more varietal flavor is lost.

 

but if I don't like lighter roasts , the lighter nuances of varaiteal flavor are lost on me.

 

but I don't mind at all.

 

plenty of difference between something from Ethiopia and from Kenya etc


Edited by rotuts (log)
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hmmm...ok but Geisha is a varietal and it's primacy is indisputable

 

So...if varietal doesn't matter, then I guess you wouldn't believe that Geisha is any better than other varietals of Arabica 

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Value Judgements are Personal.

 

Varietal does indeed matter , to the Personal Palate.

 

palates can be similar , as people are more similar to each other

 

than to other animals.  but no matter what , GreenBellPeppers are a Disease.

 

lets at least get that clear,

 

' better ' is a very slippery slope.

 

Crampons are possibly  helpful 

 

Sweet Maria's has a lot to say about Geisha

 

check it out.

 

what I roast and like , may be similar to what you roast and like

 

or not.

 

a label points the way , but might be tasteless In the Cup.

 

or not.

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2 hours ago, eugenep said:

hmmm...ok but Geisha is a varietal and it's primacy is indisputable

 

So...if varietal doesn't matter, then I guess you wouldn't believe that Geisha is any better than other varietals of Arabica 

 

 

Geisha is a novelty.  It is different, and it is rare.  That's why it is expensive.  Would I want to drink it every day if I could get it for $8/lb?  I don't think so. There... I've disputed its primacy. 

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Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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