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JoNorvelleWalker

Packaging Chocolate Eggs

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For my purposes I have mastered the art of packaging chocolate bars, but search as I might I cannot find an eGullet thread or any information on packaging chocolate eggs.  I ask as I have an egg mold in transit.  Assuming I can successfully fabricate an egg, how can I wrap or package it?  All I can think of is cellophane.

 

I've seen pictures so I know some of you are making eggs.  Do not deny it.  When I was little and still celebrated holidays the neighborhood candy establishment sold eggs in windowed cardboard boxes with cellophane grass*.  That was the early 1950's.  Is this still the state of the art?

 

 

*cellophane grass tastes terrible.  And the ubiquitous coconut cream filling not much better.

 

 

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I've used hard bottom bags with a bit of paper grass.  https://glerup.com/shop-now-candy-packaging/bags-pouches-candy-confection-food-packaging/hard-bottom-bags/clear-hard-bottom-bag-140x305-3-1-4-x-2-x-12.html

 

I've seen boxes with inserts to hold the egg, similar idea to these cupcake boxes with inserts https://www.papermart.com/clear-gold-bottom-p-e-t-cupcake-boxes/id=38533

 

dual inserts at The Chocolate Lab: https://www.instagram.com/p/BgkZQ2ChndG/

 

Or attach the egg to a chocolate base so it is free-standing.  From David H Chow:  https://www.instagram.com/p/Bg2KvZuAgW2/

 

 

 

 

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Thanks.  I did not want to make a chocolate base to ruin the egg effect.  The other solutions are too small.

 

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@JoNorvelleWalker which egg mould did you get? How many would you like to ship per box? There are many sizes of cellophane bags, perhaps there are some that are big enough for your chocolate eggs. If that doesn't work, you can get sheets of cellophane wrap -- wrap & tie around the egg. If your shipping, try putting the egg in a box with lots of packing material. 

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8 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Thanks.  I did not want to make a chocolate base to ruin the egg effect.  The other solutions are too small.

 

 

How big is your egg?  

 

You might need to get crafty. 

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17 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Assuming I can successfully fabricate an egg, how can I wrap or package it?  All I can think of is cellophane.

 

Are you asking for a safe way to package chocolate eggs to transport them, or are you asking for some artful suggestions on how to wrap a chocolate egg to make it look classy?

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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Thanks everyone.  The egg size is 265 mm x 180 mm.  I am not looking for a shipping container.  I am just looking for a way to keep them safe and make them look attractive, while not rolling on the floor.

 

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2 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Some sort of ring attached to a heavy cardstock, placed inside a large cello bag or piece of cello basket wrap?

 

I can't envision the setup.  All that comes to mind is a ring stand.  Which would be pretty neat actually.

 

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22 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I can't envision the setup.  All that comes to mind is a ring stand.  Which would be pretty neat actually.

 

Indeed - think cardboard ring stand adapted for egg - lets see if I can find some pics.

 

https://selfpackaging.com/70-easter-gift-boxes have a look at the boxes with the hole that the egg sits in - from there you can slide the whole thing into a cello bag.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Indeed - think cardboard ring stand adapted for egg - lets see if I can find some pics.

 

https://selfpackaging.com/70-easter-gift-boxes have a look at the boxes with the hole that the egg sits in - from there you can slide the whole thing into a cello bag.

 

 

 

These are exactly what I had in mind.  But tragically too small.  Perhaps I will contact them and ask for a suggestion.  Thanks!

 

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10 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

These are exactly what I had in mind.  But tragically too small.  Perhaps I will contact them and ask for a suggestion.  Thanks!

 

So you need to build yourself a bigger one!

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The most basic packaging set-up here in Italy is a ring of food grade plastic (usually HD-PE) used as a base to support the egg, then everything is wrapped in cellophan. Those rings are available in a lot of sizes through professional suppliers, but I suppose you can go to a hardware store and ask them to cut a HD-PE tube to your specifications. The base+egg are closed in a cellophan envelop, then decorated whichever way the shop wants. If you want you can use aluminum foil instead of cellophan, it just depends if you want people to be able to see the chocolate or just the egg shape.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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I forgot this. Episode IX will be released in a matter of months. Lightsabers ready must be.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

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