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DeanTheBaker

Milk Chocolate That's Not Overly Sweet?

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Hi everyone,

I am someone who used to hate milk chocolate (and white as well) because they are always too sweet for me.

but recently I got to try Valrhona's Bahibe 46% and it's really good; creamy and not sickeningly sweet.


After Valrhona has changed my mind, I'm on a quest to explore the world of milk chocolate. :D

Are there any alternatives as good or even better? what's your preference when it comes to milk chocolate?

 

Thank you.

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Available in retail bars or for professional use?  

 

Bahibe is good, but my favorite milk is Felchlin Maracaibo Creole 49%, just slightly darker and similarly priced. 

 

Theo makes a 45% milk that’s good, or Dick Taylor just launched a dark milk bar that I haven’t tried. I think dark milk is trending among bean-to-bar makers and we’ll be seeing more. 

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I mostly use Felchlin Maracaibo Criolait (a bit sweeter than the Creole pastrygirl mentioned). I was recently given samples of just about all the Felchlin milks. The Sao Palme is delicious but comes only in what are for me gigantic amounts. So I stick with Criolait. The very best I have ever tasted is Fortunato No. 4 from Peru (available only in the U.S. from Chef Rubber, made by Felchlin--thus the incredible smoothness--but not labeled as made by that company). It's 47% and is smooth as one could ever want (IMO) with no sour dairy notes. BUT (and this is what kept me from using it for everything) it contains no lecithin or added cocoa butter, meaning that it is very difficult to use for shelling--it will go from a bit too fluid to very viscous in minutes--and I wasn't willing to add things to it. So I use it sometimes for fillings. Before I became a Felchlin convert (perhaps fanatic), I used Guittard's Orinoco (now called Eclipse du Soleil); it is lower in cost and widely available.

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You can also blend your own - take a super sweet milk and add a splash of dark to taste. 

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12 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

I think dark milk is trending among bean-to-bar makers and we’ll be seeing more.


I hadn't actually given it any serious thought and don't recall setting it as a goal but looking at what I've done so far, I haven't made a batch of milk chocolate below 40% with most being in the 45% - 50% range. Of course, I'm certainly not setting any trends at my level.

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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1 hour ago, Tri2Cook said:


Of course, I'm certainly not setting any trends at my level.

 

don't say that, say "I'm ahead of the curve, clearly" 😁

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i'm jealous of all of you who live in the states and europe. 😥
I live in Asia, and there are only a few good chocolate brands available (eg. Valrhona, Michel Cluizel, Cacao barry, Callebaut).

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Well, you have other amazing produce available fresh, which I guess we're jealous of - I know I am. :D 

 

Aren't there quite a few cocoa plantations in Indonesia? Should at least be someone selling chocolate from those farms?

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