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steveM

Source for whole milk powder

12 posts in this topic

I just started a new Craft Chocolate Company and am looking for a source for powdered whole milk on a small scale (3-5kg).  Any suggestions?

 

Steve

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Most of the commercial bakery suppliers sell milk powder in 50 pound bags.

 

When I was catering and baking large  batches - in which I used whole milk powder - I bought NIDO powdered whole milk in the 1.6kg cans by the case.  The product is EXCELLENT.  

At the time I bought it at the local Mexican supermarket because none of the regular stores carried WHOLE MILK POWDER.  They gave me a discount for buying a case.

Now it is available at Walmart.  Free shipping


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Many people here in Pátzcuaro use Nido powdered milk as a substitute for coffee creamer. Bear in mind that there are several forms, generally made for children, so be sure you're buying whole milk powder. I add it to the milk when I make yogurt. The next time we're in the US I'll look for it at Walmart. It's a good product and it comes in a variety of sizes.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

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Formerly "Nancy in CO"

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26 minutes ago, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

Many people here in Pátzcuaro use Nido powdered milk as a substitute for coffee creamer. Bear in mind that there are several forms, generally made for children, so be sure you're buying whole milk powder. I add it to the milk when I make yogurt. The next time we're in the US I'll look for it at Walmart. It's a good product and it comes in a variety of sizes.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Except for King Arthur flour co and a couple of companies that sell on line (more expensive than NIDO)  Nido is the only WHOLE MILK powder I have been able to find in local markets.  

Twenty five years ago, both Carnation and Milkman  offered Whole dry milk as well as the low fat and non fat but now every big company only offers the low fat or non fat options.

When did full-fat milk become a liability?

Vallarta Supermarket has a large section of dry milk and NIDO is prominently displayed.  I was told that it is widely available in Mexico because fresh milk spoils quickly and many people have no refrigeration.  

When I worked in my mom's bakery in the mid-1950s, we added whole milk powder to bread dough, rolls, sweet rolls and even Danish as a way to extend the life of bread and prevent rapid staling.  It helps retain moisture in white, whole wheat and even rye breads.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Thanks for the help.  I have used Amazon but it is only available in small quantities and doesn't make economic sense.  I am trying to find something organic as that is what the target consumer prefers but i will definitely take a look for the Nido.

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17 hours ago, andiesenji said:

Except for King Arthur flour co and a couple of companies that sell on line (more expensive than NIDO)  Nido is the only WHOLE MILK powder I have been able to find in local markets.  

Twenty five years ago, both Carnation and Milkman  offered Whole dry milk as well as the low fat and non fat but now every big company only offers the low fat or non fat options.

When did full-fat milk become a liability?

Vallarta Supermarket has a large section of dry milk and NIDO is prominently displayed.  I was told that it is widely available in Mexico because fresh milk spoils quickly and many people have no refrigeration.  

When I worked in my mom's bakery in the mid-1950s, we added whole milk powder to bread dough, rolls, sweet rolls and even Danish as a way to extend the life of bread and prevent rapid staling.  It helps retain moisture in white, whole wheat and even rye breads.

How did you use milk powder in bread baking? Did you add the powder to the dry ingredients, and if so, how much? I've always baked my own bread and would definitely like to be able to keep it fresher longer.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

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Formerly "Nancy in CO"

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6 hours ago, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

How did you use milk powder in bread baking? Did you add the powder to the dry ingredients, and if so, how much? I've always baked my own bread and would definitely like to be able to keep it fresher longer.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

I add the dry milk to the other dry ingredients and make sure it is mixed well with them.  

This explanation on this site is very good.  

Years ago I found a few recipes in Peter Reinhart's books that included milk powder.  One, The Bread Baker's Apprentice, has several, as I recall.  This is one I prepare often - I use a bread machine to mix and knead it on the dough cycle, remove it and pop it into a plastic bag and put it in the fridge for at least 24 hours, often longer - 2 to 3 days.  It is as close to foolproof as any "artisan" bread.

For a more complete list of possible additives and how they affect the dough,  there is this page on the Cookistry website.

 

 

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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6 hours ago, andiesenji said:

I use a bread machine to mix and knead it on the dough cycle, remove it and pop it into a plastic bag and put it in the fridge for at least 24 hours, often longer - 2 to 3 days.  It is as close to foolproof as any "artisan" bread.

For a more complete list of possible additives and how they affect the dough,  there is this page on the Cookistry website.

Thanks for this, I want to try this just as you've described.

 

 

 

6 hours ago, andiesenji said:

 

For a more complete list of possible additives and how they affect the dough,  there is this page on the Cookistry website.

 

 

 


Edited by lindag (log)

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18 hours ago, andiesenji said:

I add the dry milk to the other dry ingredients and make sure it is mixed well with them.  

This explanation on this site is very good.  

Years ago I found a few recipes in Peter Reinhart's books that included milk powder.  One, The Bread Baker's Apprentice, has several, as I recall.  This is one I prepare often - I use a bread machine to mix and knead it on the dough cycle, remove it and pop it into a plastic bag and put it in the fridge for at least 24 hours, often longer - 2 to 3 days.  It is as close to foolproof as any "artisan" bread.

For a more complete list of possible additives and how they affect the dough,  there is this page on the Cookistry website.

 

 

Thanks for those very helpful links. I also use a bread machine on the dough setting but I like the idea of putting the dough in what I assume is a large plastic bag to allow for expansion when rising and letting it rest in the fridge. I'm going to try this the next time I make bread, which will be soon. Normally I make half and half whole wheat and white flour but this time I'm going to use all white bread flour and make that recipe.

 

N. in P.

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Formerly "Nancy in CO"

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2 hours ago, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

Thanks for those very helpful links. I also use a bread machine on the dough setting but I like the idea of putting the dough in what I assume is a large plastic bag to allow for expansion when rising and letting it rest in the fridge. I'm going to try this the next time I make bread, which will be soon. Normally I make half and half whole wheat and white flour but this time I'm going to use all white bread flour and make that recipe.

 

N. in P.

Right.  I get the JUMBO HEFTY plastic bags with slider.  They are 2 1/2 gallon so larger than the Zip-Lock bags.  

In fact, I just placed an order earlier today from Target, which is offering "buy 3 get the 4th one free" through the 27th.

So I ordered 4 and they applied the discount automatically in the checkout.

And these boxes have 15 bags each instead of 12 in the regular boxes.

Even with the shipping, these are cheaper than Amazon Prime with free shipping.   I use these all the time.  I keep small gadgets bunched in them by "category" and lids that don't fit my lid racks because of odd shapes, my silicone covers, ingredients in small packages also bunched together and hung up (seasonings in packets especially because they slip down under things) and packets of condiments.

Also socks, scarves, wool items that I want to keep moth-free.  Sweaters folded nicely store in them perfectly. 

etc., etc., etc.  

 

Screen Shot 2017-05-22 at 9.26.41 AM.png


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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If any Canadian bakers are following this thread, you can get whole milk powder at Bulk Barn.


Fat=flavor

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