Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Shel_B

Adding Salt to Coffee?

Recommended Posts

A couple of weeks ago we had an event here at my apartment building.  The woman who made the coffee told me that she added a small amount of salt to the freshly brewed coffee.  I was stunned ... never heard of such a thing!

 

A few days ago I was watching an old episode of Good Eats, and there was Alton adding a pinch of salt to his fresh-brewed French press coffee, saying that the salt reduces bitterness.  Once again I was surprised.

 

So, what's the story behind adding salt to fresh-brewed coffee?  Is it done if the beans are mediocre or poorly roasted?  Or when certain methods are used for brewing?  Or is it just something people do because they heard about it and don't know better ... like how searing a steak seals in juices?  Do you put salt in your coffee? 

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a trick that's been around a very long time—it's especially useful in suppressing the bitterness of cheap robusta coffee.

My grandparents—extremely frugal folks—added a tiny pinch of salt to the coffee pot for decades.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard about it a long time ago, tired it once or twice. I couldn't tell any real difference but I am not very discerning at the differences between differences in the coffees I generally use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well,  well,  just to review, well ....

 

percolator coffee , ....   well;

 

it's  true that a tiny  ( tiny ) bit of salt, changes the ability of Le Tongue to transmit "  taste "  or just get better at it transmissions.

 

it should not ' taste ' salty, so if you try this and it tastes salty use less.

 

however, well, Percolator ?

 

it does indeed need a big boost for  ' flavor '   a Big Boost.

 

and no In not a Coffee Snob.

 

I have looked into my Personal Cup   ( a double espresso now days and forever )

 

and indeed a tiny tiny tiny bit of salt

 

( 4 molecules, no more ) changes Le tongue's dynamics.

 

Id use more than 4 molecules for the percolator.   just saying.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Seems to me I recall something about eggshells being tossed into percolating coffee.  I definitely remember salt but it goes back many decades. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Egg shells and even whole eggs, plus a pinch of salt were used in boiled coffee, Norwegian or Swedish coffee or as many call it "Cowboy Coffee"  boiled in a big graniteware coffee pot over a campfire (or nowadays a grill).

 

I was introduced to it in 1956 when I went to Minneapolis to attend baking school (Dunwoodie) and lived with a Norwegian family.

They made coffee that way.  

 

I'm sure coffee was made that way on my grandpa's farm but by the time I was a child in the '40s, there were more sophisticated and modern brewers.  My grandpa loved gadgetry - no question where I got the trait.


Edited by andiesenji (log)
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, egg shells and egg whites helped clear coffee when it was simmered in water without any thing to keep it separate from the water. "Cowboy" coffee: just throw the grounds into a pot with water then worry about removing the grounds later.  Egg and egg shells' ability to remove solids has been long known. Jaques Pepin, in La Technique uses egg whites to clear stock when making consommé.


Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something weird is going on with egg shells. I have no desire to prove the science or debate it. After I read somewhere on here that if you are trying to fish a small fragment of shell out of eggs that you've broken into a skillet or bowl, your best tool is the shell the eggs came of. I didn't believe it because it made no sense within the science I know. After a bout of attempting to fish a piece of shell out of eggs with a stainless teaspoon several times, I tried one of the discarded shells in desperation. Like it had some sort of magnetic property, it magically fished out the shell fragment on the first try. I haven't deviated from the method since. Works efficiently every time for me, but I haven't a clue why this is so.

 

I have also had this cowboy coffee and it does help to settle the grounds when just cooking coffee grounds in a pot of water. Can't explain that either, but it works. Handy during a power outage.

 

I believe that a little salt would balance out an overly bitter flavor, but since I've never run into a coffee too bitter for me, I haven't tried it. I will keep it in mind if I ever do. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I've always heard of this as camp or canoe coffee but some call it cowboy coffee (not too many cowboys in my part of the country) :D

Always made by boiling water, taking it off the fire, throwing in the grounds, waiting a few minutes then pouring in some cold water to settle the grounds.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had never heard of putting salt in coffee until I met my husband.  As I was growing up, my parents always drank coffee twice a day, using beans my mother ground before she made it.  He insists on a pinch of salt in with the coffee before brewing.  We buy coffee that is ground for us when we buy it.  I can't tell the difference between the salt added and no salt added.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎4‎/‎29‎/‎2016 at 10:17 AM, DiggingDogFarm said:

It's a trick that's been around a very long time—it's especially useful in suppressing the bitterness of cheap robusta coffee.

My grandparents—extremely frugal folks—added a tiny pinch of salt to the coffee pot for decades.

 

And that's the coffee used by the woman who suggested salting the coffee ...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/30/2016 at 1:17 AM, DiggingDogFarm said:

It's a trick that's been around a very long time—it's especially useful in suppressing the bitterness of cheap robusta coffee.

My grandparents—extremely frugal folks—added a tiny pinch of salt to the coffee pot for decades.

 

 

Huh. This is interesting. So I guess that's why some people add salt to chocolate too.

It's curious though if you think of it, you add salt to coffee to block out the bitterness and same principle applies to chocolate, but people add coffee to chocolate to enhance its flavour. Food for thought. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a dear friend from Germany that taught me about salt in the coffee  I met her when I was doing post grad work and working 2 jobs, finding it necessary to consume great amounts of coffee.   I noticed that when she made her coffee, she'd get a good pinch of salt and drop it into the grinds before brewing, or sometimes she'd drop it into the brewed pot of coffee.  Puzzled, I ask her what the heck she was doing.  She was equally as puzzled at me for asking, as I was with her putting salt in!   She had grown up with this practice her whole life---so it was just normal to her.  But, she explained that the salt removes some of the bitterness.  

I came to appreciate this greatly.  Relatively speaking, we were both pretty poor, working long hours, and trying to get through school.  So, we weren't in a position to buy the best coffee, and the salt improved things. Given how much of the stuff we drank, its one of those things that made life a little more pleasant during those lean and hungry years. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only thing I add is sugar and milk. Salt shouldn't be necessary, and it can be unhealthy if you get too much salt..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On September 4, 2016 at 7:48 AM, lisaSon said:

Only thing I add is sugar and milk. Salt shouldn't be necessary, and it can be unhealthy if you get too much salt..

I don't think the pinch you add to the coffee grounds is enough to be unhealthy - if indeed salt is evil. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK I know I'm dragging up a slightly dated thread, but I have to say I have always found this to be a very irritating practice.   I have never been a coffee snob  being employed in either construction or the military, neither ever affords good coffee (well until recently setting up a coffee shop and then I had to up my game).  I have always found this to be a psychological red herring for bad coffee so that somehow they could convince themselves it wasn't so bad.  News flash, it is still bad coffee.  More over it seems in my experience it is perpetrated in one of two ways, either by the person who makes bad coffee waaaay too strong anyway guaranteeing it will be bitter, and the person who will add enough you can actually taste it making it exponentially worse.  Either way when I see someone putting salt in coffee I know I'm not going to be drinking it for the enjoyment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What folks like to eat/drink, what they can afford to eat/drink, and how they prepare it is their business.

Can't hate them for taking the edge off of cheap bitter coffee with a little salt.

I'm thinking mostly of some folks I know who lived through the depression-era....they developed a taste for things such as lightly salted coffee or tea , sour milk curds, gruel, smashed potatoes and hot milk, bread and milk, cornmeal mush, lard sandwiches, etc.


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never done it before, I only add sugar or milk. But I have ever drink milk with sault, it tasted not bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      INSTEAD OF COFFEE? - MORNING GREEN COCKTAIL
       
      After waking up, most of us head towards the kitchen for the most welcome morning drink. Coffee opens our eyes, gets us up and motivates us to act. Today I would like to offer you a healthy alternative to daily morning coffee. I don't want to turn you off coffee completely. After all, it has an excellent aroma and fantastic flavor. There isn't anything more relaxing during a busy day than a coffee break with friends.

      In spite of the weather outside, change your kitchen for a while and try something new. My green cocktail is also an excellent way to wake up and restore energy. Add to it a pinch of curcuma powder, which brings comfort and acts as a buffer against autumn depression.

      Ingredients (for 2 people):
      200ml of green tea
      4 new kale leaves
      1 green cucumber
      half an avocado
      1 pear
      1 banana
      pinch of salt
      pinch of curcuma

      Peel the avocado, pear and banana. Remove the core from the pear. Blend every ingredient very thoroughly. If the drink is too thick, add some green tea. Drink at once.

      Enjoy your drink!
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Even though I would like to change the situation, the winter is coming. Sooner or later there will be sharp winds, frost and unpleasant moisture. I don't know how you like to warm up at home, but on the first cold day I dust off my home recipe for hot and yummy winter teas.

      You can use my recipe or come up with your own proposals for fiery mixtures. Only one thing should be the same: your favourite tea must be strong and hot.

      Ingredients (for 2 teas)
      Raspberry-orange
      8 cloves
      a piece of cinnamon
      2 grains of cardamom
      4 slices of orange
      2 teaspoons of honey
      your favourite tea
      50ml of raspberry juice or 30ml of raspberry juice and 30ml of raspberry liqueur
      Add 4 of the cloves, cinnamon and cardamom to some water and boil for a while to release their flavour and aroma. Remove the seasoning and brew the tea with this water. Crush two slices of orange with honey. Add the raspberry juice or a mixture of juice and liqueur to the tea. Next add the honey with orange. Mix it in. Decorate the tea with the rest of the cloves and orange.

      Lemon-ginger
      8 cloves
      3 slices of fresh ginger
      2 grains of cardamom
      50ml of ginger syrup or 30ml of ginger syrup and 30ml of ginger-lemon liqueur
      4 slices of lemon
      2 teaspoons of honey
      Add 4 of the cloves, ginger and cardamom to some water and boil for a while to release their flavour and aroma. Remove the seasoning and brew the tea with this water. Crush two slices of lemon with honey. Add the ginger syrup or mixture of syrup and liqueur to the tea. Next add honey with lemon. Mix it in. Decorate the tea with the rest of the cloves and lemon.

      Enjoy your drink!

    • By Kasia
      My Irish Coffee  
      Today the children will have to forgive me, but adults also sometimes want a little pleasure. This is a recipe for people who don't have to drive a car or work, i.e. for lucky people or those who can rest at the weekend. Irish coffee is a drink made with strong coffee, Irish Whiskey, whipped cream and brown sugar. It is excellent on cold days. I recommend it after an autumn walk or when the lack of sun really gets you down. Basically, you can spike the coffee with any whiskey, but in my opinion Jameson Irish Whiskey is the best for this drink.

      If you don't like whiskey, instead you can prepare another kind of spiked coffee: French coffee with brandy, Spanish coffee with sherry, or Jamaican coffee with dark rum.
      Ingredients (for 2 drinks)
      300ml of strong, hot coffee
      40ml of Jameson Irish Whiskey
      150ml of 30% sweet cream
      4 teaspoons of coarse brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of caster sugar
      4 drops of vanilla essence
      Put two teaspoons of brown sugar into the bottom of two glasses. Brew some strong black coffee and pour it into the glasses. Warm the whiskey and add it to the coffee. Whisk the sweet cream with the caster sugar and vanilla essence. Put it gently on top so that it doesn't mix with the coffee.

      Enjoy your drink!
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for swift autumn cookies with French pastry and a sweet ginger-cinnamon-pear stuffing. Served with afternoon coffee they warm us up brilliantly and dispel the foul autumn weather.

      Ingredients (8 cookies)
      1 pack of chilled French pastry
      1 big pear
      1 flat teaspoon of cinnamon
      1 teaspoon of fresh grated ginger
      2 tablespoons of brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of vanilla sugar
      2 tablespoons of milk

      Heat the oven up to 190C. Cover a baking sheet with some baking paper.
      Wash the pear, peel and cube it. Add the grated ginger, cinnamon, vanilla sugar and one tablespoon of the brown sugar. Mix them in. Cut 8 circles out of the French pastry. Cut half of every circle into parallel strips. Put the pear stuffing onto the other half of each circle. Roll up the cookies starting from the edges with the stuffing. Put them onto the baking paper and make them into cones. Smooth the top of the pastry with the milk and sprinkle with brown sugar. bake for 20-22 minutes.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       
       

    • By Hezo541
      My friend sent me some Chinese tea called Songxiang tea. 
      Has anybody drunk this kind of tea? It's the first time I've heard of this tea.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×