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Dman104

La Potence - Where can I eat this?

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Not sure if this is the right place to be posting this. I'm looking for a restaurant that serves La Potence, had it a few times on holiday in the French Alps several years ago and want to introduce this to my girlfriend. Does anyone know of anywhere that serves this??? I live in the South East (Milton Keynes - an hour out of London) but enjoyed it so much last time that would be willing to travel a fair distance to have this meal again.

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What is it? Neither I or Mr Google have heard of it.

French is my first language, but I don't know any use of "La Potence" as something to eat.


Edited by liuzhou (log)

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Never heard of this before. I did just a quick search on the web--the dish is also called la potence

flambee.

 

Try a google search "restaurants that serve la potence"

 

I also picked up at least one YouTube video with a google search for "youtube la potence flambee"

 

Off the top of my head, this dish is a house specialty, not common at all, and I noticed only a handful

of restaurants--worldwide--that serve it.

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Here is a description for anyone who cares to know what it is.
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Here is a description for anyone who cares to know what it is.

 

From what I have found that is merely one version. There is also a version using shrimp. But very rare.

 

I don't think it is a specific dish.

 

"La Potence" means "gallows' in English, so I guess the protein is dead.

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From what I have found that is merely one version. There is also a version using shrimp. But very rare.

 

I don't think it is a specific dish.

 

"La Potence" means "gallows' in English, so I guess the protein is dead.

Interesting. Most of the hits I got mentioned beef and it did say that it was enjoyed in the French Alps not in a coastal area. Let's hope the OP cares enough to check back in and clarify what is meant by La Potence.

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In my research on this dish, I found a now closed restaurant in (of all places) Glendale, AZ, that used to have it on the menu. There's still discussion of the dish in English and photos of it being flambeed along with the array of sauces and wild rice that were served with it there. I have no idea if this is representative of how it's traditionally served in France.

 

http://www.yelp.com/biz/le-chalet-glendale-2

 

You'll need to use your browser's "find" function to cut to the chase on the discussion of "la potence" in the 198 reviews. I don't know of any shortcuts to go to directly to the photos of it in 149 of them. Most of the photos are of crepes, but there are lots of the spectacular La Potense they used to serve, and IMO photos of crepes aren't bad at all.  :smile:

 

I think the name derives from the meat being presented hung suspended from a hook before being flambeed tableside.

 

This is a very interesting dish I had never heard of either; it sounds delicious; and I sincerely hope the OP can find it to share with his girlfriend.

 

There are very few English-speaking sites with much to say on it, but it was very interesting finding out about this French specialty. As others have said, it's a rarity in the English world.

 

Here's another link to Google images of "la potence flambee" (thanks djyee100) because googling for just "la potence" only brought up a lot of creepy images of actual gallows with only a few images of this dish in the focus of this topic.

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=la+potence+flambee+images&espv=2&biw=1097&bih=546&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=-79hVcrIGcOayASFsYHgBA&ved=0CCAQsAQ


Edited by Thanks for the Crepes (log)

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Hi Dman 104, 
I know one place serving this special dish : This is restaurant " La Fromagerie in Courchevel" this is a skiing vacation spot in savoie (French Alps). 

For further information:
 Restaurant La Fromagerie
La Porte de Courchevel   
73120 COURCHEVEL 1850

Tél. : +33 (0)4 79 08 27 47
Fax : +33 (0)4 79 08 20 91

 

If you want to buy your own  "gallow", check this:

 

 http://www.savoie-specialite.com/potence_pendu,14,r.html 

 

Sorry , it's in French.

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