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Whole vs Non Fat Dry Milk Powders for Baking


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Quick/lazy question as I didn't have time to do the searches for previous posts - apologies in advance. I normally would take the time.

 

Making some fast rise rolls for Easter dinner that I can prep ahead.

 

 Most baking/roll recipes  that use dry milk call for non-fat dry milk powder vs whole milk powder.

 

In the cake, desert recipes from Christina Tosi (Milk Bar) she calls mostly for whole dry milk.

 

What's the risk in using whole dry milk powder vs non-fat dry milk powder when baking things like rolls/bread?

 

I'm looking at a recipe for pull apart style rolls that calls for NF Dry Milk and wondering if it really makes much difference/why.

 

Higher fat content in the whole dry milk to me seems to be a plus in this case.

 

For reference here's the recipe (KA)

 

Buns
  • 3 1/2 cups KA Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 2 tablespoons potato flour or 1/4 cup instant potato flakes
  • 3 tablespoons Baker's Special Dry Milk or nonfat dry milk
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 4 tablespoons soft butter
  • 2/3 cup lukewarm water
  • 1/2 cup lukewarm milk
Edited by rbenash (log)
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  • 5 months later...

I'm not an expert but I use powdered whole milk for all my bread and baking recipes that call for milk and it works just fine. I expect that calling for non-fat in this recipe is because it is their preference (or their default choice), not because whole milk wouldn't work.

 

The powdered milk I buy keeps good for at least a year in a cool dark cupboard.

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I've never used whole milk powder but would be much more inclined to use nonfat dry milk, and to make up the difference with a little butter. Milkfat is perishable by way of oxidation, and will develop off-flavors pretty quickly. You could probably offset this by vacuum sealing and storing in the freezer, but what's the advantage?

 

FWIW, I look for nonfat dry milk that's 100% skim milk solids, and that has been spray-dried at low temperatures (Now brand is very good—I checked with them and they say they dry at 72°C for 15 seconds, so there's very little cooked flavor).

 

I evacuate the air and put the original container in a ziploc bag and store in the freezer. Even nonfat dry milk picks up off flavors easily. I use quite a bunch of this stuff in ice cream and don't want any weirdness. 

Notes from the underbelly

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<snip>

Making some fast rise rolls for Easter dinner that I can prep ahead.

 

 Most baking/roll recipes  that use dry milk call for non-fat dry milk powder vs whole milk powder.

 

In the cake, desert recipes from Christina Tosi (Milk Bar) she calls mostly for whole dry milk.

 

What's the risk in using whole dry milk powder vs non-fat dry milk powder when baking things like rolls/bread?

 

I'm looking at a recipe for pull apart style rolls that calls for NF Dry Milk and wondering if it really makes much difference/why.

<snip>

rbenash, what did you finally do, and how did it turn out?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Please let us know how it works out. Enquiring minds, and all that....

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I use the whole milk powder - often from King Arthur  but I also get Nido at the Mexican Market.

 

I like the results in baked goods because it prevents rapid staling and for some yeast breads that are sweet, it controls the rise so that one has a less fluffy result (than I do not like).  

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Have some frozen unbaked rolls vac sealed in the freezer from last recipe.

 

Everyone loved them so I will definitely be making this recipe again. The recipe is great IMHO for fast bake dinner rolls, not saying they were the

BEST I've had :-)

 

Next recipe I'll use the WMP I have from Hoosier Hill Farm. This stuff smells and mixes like real milk to me anyway. It's vac sealed so should hold well.

 

BTW the recipe I was working with was Anytime Dinner Rolls from ATK.

 

 

Ray

Edited by rbenash (log)
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