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IndyRob

Sriracha "Caviar"

8 posts in this topic

There is a big Sriracha thread already, but I'd like to ask about a more specific application.

For me, I think the best recommendation from that thread is sriracha on scrambled eggs. From that, I find that like to dot my eggs with sriracha, so it occurred to me that a spherified caviar form could be cool way to add a visual element to the introduction of novices to the practice.

I read all the spherification threads with interest, but really have never had the desire to experiment with all the forms. But this application, I feel, is one I really want to do.

So, for those so versed, what is the proper path to Sriracha Caviar?

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You could try using agar and dripping the mix into cold oil to create jellied 'caviar'. It won't be liquid inside but the look is pretty much the same and I find it much easier than actual spherification.


James.

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If you want the liquid centers, go with the "reverse" method of putting the calcium source in the base and dropping into a gelling bath. Either way will work but they can hang around longer that way. Gellan-based pearls are a nice option to the agar version if you're not worried about liquid centers. I like the texture and flavor release better.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I just zig zag a good tablespoon squeeze of sriacha on anything I'm eating when it's available but would be interested to see how your experiments turn out...


"Experience is something you gain just after you needed it" ....A Wise man

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Okay, I've received my initial components. As a matter of principle, I've decided to first attempt regular sperification before I try to reverse it, or attempt parallel techniques.

So I have some sodium alginate and xanthan gum for the base, and calcium chloride for the bath. This leads me to another question....

The base formulation offered by Mondernist Pantry involves starting with 500g of base. That's roughly a whole bottle of sriracha. I'll need to reduce that, but it occurs to me that if I keep the base and bath separate, there's nothing to suggest that these won't stay stable in the refrigerator. It that true? I could take both out of the refrigeration and spherify on the fly?

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Well, lesson #1 has been learned. Apparently, the addition of xanthan gum is desireable to achieve some gelling action in something like apple juice - so it doesn't just disperse when dropped into the bath. But adding the same amount to sriracha results in a sort of paste.

Thus, my first attempts more resembled sriracha mouse droppings rather than any sort of caviar. I tried drops of unadulterated sriracha into plain water and they dispersed immediately. Clearly, this is going to be a fine balancing act.

In the interim, it's time to explore the magic that is sriracha paste. :raz:

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Well, lesson #1 has been learned. Apparently, the addition of xanthan gum is desireable to achieve some gelling action in something like apple juice - so it doesn't just disperse when dropped into the bath. But adding the same amount to sriracha results in a sort of paste.

Thus, my first attempts more resembled sriracha mouse droppings rather than any sort of caviar. I tried drops of unadulterated sriracha into plain water and they dispersed immediately. Clearly, this is going to be a fine balancing act.

In the interim, it's time to explore the magic that is sriracha paste. tongue.gif

Well you could take the paste, spread it thin and dehydrate it and have sriracha 'glass' or 'crisps'.

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I somehow remembered this thread today and decided to do another internet search.  There appears to be some more experience now....

 

http://www.foodnrecipe.com/articles/2066/20120822/molecular-gastronomy-recipe-foodnrecipes-tom-yum-goong.htm (might be diluted?)

 

http://www.molecularrecipes.com/gelification/sriracha-pearls-cold-oil-spherification/ (Looks to be exactly what Broken English suggested)

 

http://cookingblahg.blogspot.com/2013/06/sriracha-honey-caviar.html (A little different take)

 

http://www.saltyseattle.com/2011/03/consider-the-oyster-simple-sriracha-bubbles/ (more of a foam, really, but it does look interesting with oysters)

 

And I found that I had either missed or forgotten from the Top Chef Season 12 Premiere - that the first chef eliminated did so with the help of Sriracha Caviar :raz:.


Edited by IndyRob (log)

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