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lorib

Vegetarian Restaurant in Amsterdam

4 posts in this topic

Hello,

My husband will be traveling to Amsterdam next month on business. Are there any great vegetarian restaurants there? He may have to entertain a client.

Thank you,

Lori

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Well, old or not, here are some other suggestions just in case anyone else is looking.

Completely vegetarian:

- http://www.bettys.nl

I guess this must be the most upscale veggie restaurant in town. They work with Oliver Roellinger's herbs, among other things. No personal experience to share, but I heard good comments about it. It's located in the Jordaan, 10-15 minute walk from Central Station. Give them a call upfront if the meal should be vegan.

They also sell goodies from different producers to take home. Could be a nice incentive for a client to take home, every time it's used they will think you.

- http://www.maritshuiskamerrestaurant.nl

Living room restaurant with a not so homey look, but the vibe and food do. The owner is designer/chef Marit, who cooks vegetarian with biological, fair trade and local produce. There's no menu, it differs per day so call her beforehand about vegan or dietary requests. Location is near Oosterpark in the East with metro, bus and tram nearby.

- De Bolhoed on the Prinsengracht has an alternative feel to it. Very colourful interior, hindu art on the wall and a book swap corner. It's cosy, but might be an acquired taste. I've heard many mixed reviews about the food and service, but they do have vegan dishes on their regular menu.

- http://www.waaghals.nl/infoENG.htm is near the Weteringschans and the Rijksmuseum, reachable by tram. It has a bi-monthly changing menu, local brewed beers and organic wines. Informal atmosphere, but looks way more neat than De Bolhoed. I heard better reviews about this place.

- http://www.vliegendeschotel.com/en is near the Rozengracht in the Jordaan area, so public transport is nearby. This is Amsterdams oldest vegetarian restaurant. A bit colourful interiorwise, a mostly biological mish mash menu and always vegan options available.

- http://www.restaurantgoldentemple.com is run by Indian people and has an alternative feel. It's located on one of the foodie streets, de Utrechtsestraat near Rembrandtsquare. The menu is international, completely vegetarian + vegan and raw options as well. Might be an acquired taste...

If it's not necessary to have a completely vegetarian restaurant, here are some options that serve nice veggie food too. Let's start with the more upscale stuff, what might be what you are looking for when entertaining a client:

- http://www.restaurantdekas.nl/opening-times-and-bookings opens for both lunch and dinner. If you are looking for a special location then you should take a look on their website. They have a special business table, but check out their nursery and garden room too. Fixed menu, but they happily cater to vegetarians as well.

- http://www.restaurantvermeer.nl is conveniently across Central Station.

- http://www.okura.nl has several restaurants, Japanese, French and a champagne bar with a view.

Less formal:

- http://www.tempodoeloerestaurant.nl on the Utrechtsestraat if you're looking for a rice table. As with all Indonesian restaurants I would advise to check beforehand how their vegetarian policy is. Trassie is a small part of many dishes, but not suitable for strict vegetarians.

- http://www.betawi.nl has been in the top restaurant list of one of the biggest vegetarian online community's for ages. Small, cosy and a bit quirky but enthousiastic staff. If you order an eggplant dish, ask them to cook it so it melts in your mouth. This is 2 or 3 tram stops away from Sloterdijk, so literally almost an outsider.

- http://www.moeders.com is a very homey restaurant, which serves Dutch food as a rice table so you get to try different Dutch dishes. The walls are covered with pictures of mothers. The plates and cutlery were crowd sourced, so no table is layed out the same. Near Rozengracht, tram and bus stops in the area.

- http://www.bierfabriek.com is conveniently located on the Rokin, so just a few minutes walk away from Central Station. Nice space, a lot of wood work and beer brewing kettles. Very limited menu, but one of few places where you will find veggie bitterballen (famous Dutch fried ragout balls, nephews of the kroket) which are even home made. Just 3 choices of beer, but they do have a Dutch cheese board to match.

- http://deprael.nl is a bit hidden in the red light district/Chinatown area. It's a brewery with a proeflokaal, a bit pub like if you will. Small menu, might be a good idea to check beforehand about their vegetarian options. Interior feels a bit outdated as does the menu, but if you're looking for that Dutchie brown cafe feel this is a good option.

Obviously, there's a lot more available in Amsterdam, just a few hints where to look mostly around the centre.

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