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Linguine with Squash, Goat Cheese and Bacon


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Linguine with Squash, Goat Cheese and Bacon

Serves 4 as Main Dishor 6 as Side.

I stumbled on this while looking for recipes with goat cheese. It's from Real Simple (and it is!). I couldn't imagine the combination of flavors, but it was wonderful.

  • 6 slices bacon
  • 1 2- to 2 ½-pound butternut squash—peeled, seeded, and diced (4 to 5 cups)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1-1/2 c chicken broth
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 4 oz soft goat cheese, crumbled
  • 1 lb linguine, cooked
  • 1 T olive oil
  • 2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Cook the bacon in a large skillet over medium heat until crisp, about 5 minutes. Drain on a paper towel, then crumble or break into pieces; set aside. Drain all but about 2 tablespoons of the bacon fat from the skillet. Add the squash and garlic to the skillet and sauté over medium heat for 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in the broth and salt. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the squash is cooked through and softened, 20 to 25 minutes. Add half the goat cheese and stir well to combine. Place the cooked linguine in a large bowl. Stir the sauce into the linguine and toss well to coat. Drizzle with the olive oil and add the reserved bacon, the remaining goat cheese, and the pepper. Serve immediately.

Keywords: Main Dish, Easy, Vegetables, Dinner

( RG2158 )

Don't ask. Eat it.

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