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Lievre a la royale in Paris

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This just came to mind: Seeing how I can't get anything of the sort in The States, bonus points to anyone who can direct me to a plate of lièvre à la royale.


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

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This just came to mind: Seeing how I can't get anything of the sort in The States, bonus points to anyone who can direct me to a plate of lièvre à la royale.

This is out of date - but you might check out the restaurants where the dish is mentioned - see if they still exist - and whether they still serve the dish. Robyn

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This just came to mind: Seeing how I can't get anything of the sort in The States, bonus points to anyone who can direct me to a plate of lièvre à la royale.

On special order at Senderens. At Le Bristol. Maybe Gérard Besson. Definitely Bernard Loiseau (serves both recipes together). La Table de JR.

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This just came to mind: Seeing how I can't get anything of the sort in The States, bonus points to anyone who can direct me to a plate of lièvre à la royale.

On special order at Senderens. At Le Bristol. Maybe Gérard Besson. Definitely Bernard Loiseau (serves both recipes together). La Table de JR.

Are you saying that I'll always find it at Le Bristol, B. Loiseu's, and La Table de JR? This IS exciting.

I'll just have to make sure I don't tell whomever I'm eating with what it is. The last time I ordered it, I accidentally let it slip to my friend - after he took a bite - and he just about left the restaurant. Amateur. :hmmm:


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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This just came to mind: Seeing how I can't get anything of the sort in The States, bonus points to anyone who can direct me to a plate of lièvre à la royale.

On special order at Senderens. At Le Bristol. Maybe Gérard Besson. Definitely Bernard Loiseau (serves both recipes together). La Table de JR.

A few restaurants do serve lièvre à la royale in Paris but it is a very seasonal dish, so most of those that do serve it only for a short period within the year, i.e. from one to three weeks. Beware: sometimes the dining-room is booked up weeks in advance just for that recipe.

Philippe Delacourcelle at Le Pré Verre makes a wonderful lièvre à la royale sometime in November, but considering the chef's recent ventures you might have to go to Japan to order it this Fall. If he isn't in Paris then, don't bother ordering the dish, if indeed it is mentioned on the chalkboard at all.

Don't forget La Biche au Bois for game in the Fall, they should have a LALR too. The best lièvre à la royale I ever had was prepared by Marie Naël, chef of Ecaille et Plume on rue Duvivier, back in the 90s. But that restaurant is no more and years later I still miss it.


Edited by Ptipois (log)

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A few restaurants do serve lièvre à la royale in Paris but it is a very seasonal dish, so most of those that do serve it only for a short period within the year, i.e. from one to three weeks. Beware: sometimes the dining-room is booked up weeks in advance just for that recipe.

Philippe Delacourcelle at Le Pré Verre makes a wonderful lièvre à la royale sometime in November, but considering the chef's recent ventures you might have to go to Japan to order it this Fall. If he isn't in Paris then, don't bother ordering the dish, if indeed it is mentioned on the chalkboard at all.

Don't forget La Biche au Bois for game in the Fall, they should have a LALR too. The best lièvre à la royale I ever had was prepared by Marie Naël, chef of Ecaille et Plume on rue Duvivier, back in the 90s. But that restaurant is no more and years later I still miss it.

Is early December too late for lièvre à la royale? The last time I had it (not in France) was in November, as you say.


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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It was on the menu at Taillevent last October. I did order it..very good....

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This just came to mind: Seeing how I can't get anything of the sort in The States, bonus points to anyone who can direct me to a plate of lièvre à la royale.

I believe that Restaurant Michel Rostang at 20 rue Rennequin in the 17th arrondissement, not far from the Arc de Triomphe, serves a beautiful plate of le lièvre à la royale on their fall or winter menu:

Le lièvre à la royale et son rable cuit rose, taglierini au beurre @ €69

And they also serve a delicious pressed duck dish for two, which is one of their specialities, and it is always on the menu:

La canette "mieral" au sang, servie saignante en 2 services, sauce au vin rouge liee de son sang et au foie gras, mitonnee de cuisses, petite salade aux aromates (pour 2 personnes) @ €73 / pers

Around the week before Christmas in 2005, my husband and I had le lièvre à la royale, and it was absolutely delicious. We have had la canette "mieral" au sang many times, and it is always a treat, too.


"Some ladies smoke too much and some ladies drink too much and some ladies pray too much, but all ladies think that they weigh too much."

From a poem by Ogden Nash - Curl Up and Diet

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This just came to mind: Seeing how I can't get anything of the sort in The States, bonus points to anyone who can direct me to a plate of lièvre à la royale.

I've had it at Petit Marguery...


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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Don't forget La Biche au Bois for game in the Fall, they should have a LALR too.

I must disagree Pti, a rare occasion. Since its ownership has changed the BAuB is a shadow of its old self, despite keeping the waitstaff "on." Their 120 FF game lunch with the vrai BAuB and chestnut puree was a treasure.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Their 120 FF game lunch with the vrai BAuB and chestnut puree was a treasure.

A treasure no longer to be had there?

Oh they still have it (in game season) and it's still reasonable but the sauce (the last time I went) was watery and the biche not top of the line.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Their 120 FF game lunch with the vrai BAuB and chestnut puree was a treasure.

A treasure no longer to be had there?

Oh they still have it (in game season) and it's still reasonable but the sauce (the last time I went) was watery and the biche not top of the line.

Well, that's a biche! Pardon my French.


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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Is early December too late for lièvre à la royale?  The last time I had it (not in France) was in November, as you say.

It might be later, but November and early December are the key period.

If you see any "lièvre en cabessol" being served (not very likely in Paris because it is a Périgord recipe), go for it because it is the ancient, original version of lièvre à la royale.

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Don't forget La Biche au Bois for game in the Fall, they should have a LALR too.

I must disagree Pti, a rare occasion. Since its ownership has changed the BAuB is a shadow of its old self, despite keeping the waitstaff "on." Their 120 FF game lunch with the vrai BAuB and chestnut puree was a treasure.

I mentioned it out of habit, but it is true that I haven't checked it up for some time.

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A few restaurants do serve lièvre à la royale in Paris but it is a very seasonal dish, so most of those that do serve it only for a short period within the year, i.e. from one to three weeks. Beware: sometimes the dining-room is booked up weeks in advance just for that recipe.

Philippe Delacourcelle at Le Pré Verre makes a wonderful lièvre à la royale sometime in November, but considering the chef's recent ventures you might have to go to Japan to order it this Fall. If he isn't in Paris then, don't bother ordering the dish, if indeed it is mentioned on the chalkboard at all.

Don't forget La Biche au Bois for game in the Fall, they should have a LALR too. The best lièvre à la royale I ever had was prepared by Marie Naël, chef of Ecaille et Plume on rue Duvivier, back in the 90s. But that restaurant is no more and years later I still miss it.

Is early December too late for lièvre à la royale? The last time I had it (not in France) was in November, as you say.

I think it is. It's really an early fall thing.

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Is early December too late for lièvre à la royale?  The last time I had it (not in France) was in November, as you say.

It might be later, but November and early December are the key period.

If you see any "lièvre en cabessol" being served (not very likely in Paris because it is a Périgord recipe), go for it because it is the ancient, original version of lièvre à la royale.

Qu'est ce que c'est, "lièvre en cabessol"?

Google was most unhelpful.


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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Lebey just issued a new guide called "où bien manger quoi à Paris" ("where to eat well what"). Under Lièvre à la Royale, I read: Joël Robuchon (l'Atelier, la Table), Carré des feuillants, l'Epigramme, Gérard Besson, Au Petit Marguery, Senderens, Stella Maris. I trust Lebey on these questions.

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If you see any "lièvre en cabessol" being served (not very likely in Paris because it is a Périgord recipe), go for it because it is the ancient, original version of lièvre à la royale.

Qu'est ce que c'est, "lièvre en cabessol"?

Google was most unhelpful.

It is (as I wrote above), the ancient, original version of lièvre à la royale, so basically the same thing with a different name. I see it is more commonly referred to as "en cabessal" and you'll have more Google hits with that spelling.

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Just back from Chez l'Ami Jean: they do it too. In fact, they do both versions -- au torchon et à la cuillère.

Did you ask if they planned doing some later or do they actually offer it right now? In case the latter is true, isn't it a little bit early?

Anyway, I've been pushing back my first visit to l'Ami Jean for about a year, I guess it could be an excellent reason to book a table right now!

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In fact, they do both versions -- au torchon et à la cuillère.

By the way, I guess "au torchon" would be the Ali-Bab version and "à la cuillère" the Sénateur Couteaux's version, or are there some other subtleties about this dish?

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