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Stockholm Restaurant Recommendations


SamanthaF
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The restaurant Bon Lloc is appearently shutting down business.. Really really bad.

Hector, could you please clarify your statement? Do you mean its "really really bad" that the restaurant is shutting down, or do you mean to say that the restaurant is closing because it is "really really bad?" If the former, I agree, if the latter, I would disagree.

U.E.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

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  • 1 month later...

Now, the last year has brought some changes to the Swedish capital, and here is a brief update:

- Bon Lloc is now closed after a very successful journey. Missed by many, even though yours truly did have two disappointing experiences at this usually fantastic restaurant during the last year. Chef Mattias Dahlgren will open a new place in the nearest future, but no news about when, where or how yet...

- Franska Matsalen (The French Dining Room) at the Grand Hotel also closed recently after more than 120 years of culinary exellence. This stiff, but beautiful restaurant was re-vamped in the late 80's and has since then become less stiff and less traditional. Not less expensive, though... The Grand Hotel will apparently be launching a new concept in the coming year, but I will certainly miss this temple of taste!

- Lux. Situated in an old factory canteen outside the centre of Stockholm, Lux is certainly one of my new favourites. This 2 year old is very confident and, in my book, also truly competent. Experimental and avant garde, but always with respect for traditional values and techniques - it is both new and familiar at the same time. So, you can easily invite both your mother in law AND your most advanced foodie friends without being nervous about the reactions. Highly recommended!

- Mistral. I have yet to try this Old Town Liliput restaurant. Only 5 tables and a two month waiting list has created quite a buzz around it, and it has recieved massive press appreciation. However, some quests do think that the menu is a bit too provocative - and they really do try to challenge your taste buds. Not the El Bulli way, but with serving very homey and traditional dishes and ingredients in a not-so-traditional style.

- Centro. A new place, situated in the epicentre of Stockholm. After a 2 million EUR renovation of an old irish pub, Centro is now a very modern and confident newcomer. Bustling bar scene and very high ambitions in the kitchen. Obviously El Bulli/Fat Duck inspired, but less experimental and provocative and with some of the best food I have had in Europe for a long time. Certainly worth a visit, but if you want a quiet and romantic evening, be warned. This is not your traditional fine-cuisine place...

- Nox. Exclusively renovated old bank in the centre of town. Beautiful and very cosmopolitan. Not for the Michelin seeker, but highly recommended for a bisto dinner of the highest standard. Noisy and crowded, and with a very chich "Nikki Beach Style" garden.

- GQ. Stands for gastronomic intelligence. Have not been there yet, so I can´t recommend it, BUT I do know that the people behind it are very competent. Many years at the traditional luxury style "Gässlingen" is a blue stamp for cooking at the highest level. GQ however, is less traditional than Gässlingen, and more into the GI, lowcarb blah blah blah trends...

Some of the "good old ones":

- F12. Modern food. Modern interior. Modern outside balcony with modern club kids and a DJ. Very traditional business type guests. Food is not challenging, but always right in the middle of the current trend, and very well prepared. Worth a visit!

- Operakällaren. At the opera house, this is an institution in swedish culinary life. The dining room is absolutely stunning and with the mix of the new ultra chic cocktail veranda - this place has come alive again! The cooking is very traditional high end french cuisine, and the level of quality is fantastic. You will not be suprised by anything this place has to offer, but at the same time - it will never let you down!

- Pontus In The Green House. Another favourite. The still young Pontus Fritihof blends traditional french cuisine with both new and old world influences. On the outside, this is a very old fashioned place, and the service is really traditional luxury style. However, the cooking is sublime and actually quite contemporary. Also, if the sampler menu is too steep for you - the three course fixed price menu at around 36 EUR is honestly one of Stockholms best bargains (and best kept secrets until now)!

- Vassa Eggen. Is now well established as one of the best in town. Modern settings, and a very competent kitchen. I have only tried the once, but it was a very nice experience. Well planned menu, and truly balanced tastes aswell as impressive sommelier work. Placed in the Elite Plaza Hotel in down town Stockholm.

- Edsbacka Krog. The only two star Michelin restaurant in Scandinavia. Very traditional french cuisine, and obviously very good food. In my mind, it is a bit stiff unless you are celebrating something special - but thats just me. Beautifully set 20 minutes outside Stockholm. Worth a try, if you can afford it!

Phew.. That was some of them for my first post here. Might come up with some more later on...

Edited by Badabing (log)
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Now, the last year has brought some changes to the Swedish capital, and here is a brief update:

*****

- Edsbacka Krog. The only two star Michelin restaurant in Scandinavia. Very traditional french cuisine, and obviously very good food. In my mind, it is a bit stiff unless you are celebrating something special - but thats just me. Beautifully set 20 minutes outside Stockholm. Worth a try, if you can afford it!

Phew.. That was some of them for my first post here. Might come up with some more later on...

Great post, but youve forgotten that Bagatelle also has two stars. :wink:

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Now, the last year has brought some changes to the Swedish capital, and here is a brief update:

*****

- Edsbacka Krog. The only two star Michelin restaurant in Scandinavia. Very traditional french cuisine, and obviously very good food. In my mind, it is a bit stiff unless you are celebrating something special - but thats just me. Beautifully set 20 minutes outside Stockholm. Worth a try, if you can afford it!

Phew.. That was some of them for my first post here. Might come up with some more later on...

Great post, but youve forgotten that Bagatelle also has two stars. :wink:

Hmmm.. The last time I looked, Bagatelle was still in Oslo? :biggrin:

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Now, the last year has brought some changes to the Swedish capital, and here is a brief update:

*****

- Edsbacka Krog. The only two star Michelin restaurant in Scandinavia. Very traditional french cuisine, and obviously very good food. In my mind, it is a bit stiff unless you are celebrating something special - but thats just me. Beautifully set 20 minutes outside Stockholm. Worth a try, if you can afford it!

Phew.. That was some of them for my first post here. Might come up with some more later on...

Great post, but youve forgotten that Bagatelle also has two stars. :wink:

Hmmm.. The last time I looked, Bagatelle was still in Oslo? :biggrin:

Youre absolutely right, my friend, though last time I checked, both Stockholm and Oslo were in Scandinavia :wink::laugh::raz:

Edited by Christopher Haatuft (log)
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Badabing.

Thanks for that update!!

u.e.

The White Guide is, in my opinion, the best and most updated guide to Swedish restaurants. They've just released the 2006 guide.

This is their top 10 Stockholm restaurants:

1. Oaxen

2. F12

3. Esperanto

4. Mistral

5. Edsbacka krog

6. Pontus in the green house

7. Lux

8. Vassa Eggen

9. Leijontornet

10. Operakällaren

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Well, my mistake on Bagatelle - I forgot. I also forgot L' Ensemble in Copenhagen, but they actually could not keep their second star and are now down to one again...

All in all, the last few years of culinary development has resulted in 10 Michelin stars for the danish capital (and another 5-10 that are in that class). This is actually quite amazing, and since Stockholm lost two stars in Wedholms and Bon Lloc, Copenhagen must (for now) be considered THE top culinary city in Scandinavia! Applause!

However, in the coming years - you will most definitely see more stars from Stockholm. Esperanto, Leijontornet, Pontus, Centro and Vassa Eggen are the safest bets...

Edited by Badabing (log)
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As a wee warning to any citybreakers, according to its website, the Lydmar Hotel's had to close (as of Monday) because the bank that owns the building wants it for office space. I stayed there four or five years ago. Terrible room (definitely not one of the ones you see in the magazines), too cool for school service, but not bad food.

Still, it's gone now.

Spanky

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  • 4 months later...

I'm off to Stockholm in October and browsing through this board and a few others, I'm amazed that "Edsbacka Krog", the only 2 Michelin starred-establishment isn't very high on anyone's list.

Has anyone tried it recently? I'd like some advice from a fellow eg'er before I shell out a king's ransom.

Also wonder whether anyone has been to Mistral, dubbed "Sweden's answer to El Bulli"...a 6-table place with dishes like almond and Jerusalem artichoke soup with fried apples; mackerel sashimi with crisped pork skin and oyster foam, caviar and fresh herbs, and the signature lamb's-neck confit in pimento-ey chorizo fat

Edited by Sea Urchin Ragout (log)
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I'm off to Stockholm in October and browsing through this board and a few others, I'm amazed that "Edsbacka Krog", the only 2 Michelin starred-establishment isn't very high on anyone's list.

Has anyone tried it recently? I'd like some advice from a fellow eg'er before I shell out a king's ransom.

Also wonder whether anyone has been to Mistral, dubbed "Sweden's answer to El Bulli"...a 6-table place with dishes like almond and Jerusalem artichoke soup with fried apples; mackerel sashimi with crisped pork skin and oyster foam, caviar and fresh herbs, and the signature lamb's-neck confit in pimento-ey chorizo fat

here comes a quick briefing about the stockholm scene for you (top 5 in my opinion)

edsbacka krog:

confident classic michelin style food and service (french) nice countryside surroundings.

F12:

probably the best front of house team in sweden modern and very good cooking by swedens hottest chef Melker andersson

Mistral:

17 seat restaurant with very good tasting menus in the heart of stockholms beautiful "gamla stan" area alot of vegetables preparead as the main ingredient it looks alot like the cooking of michel bras (beautifull)

Esperanto:

probably the hottest restaurant in sweden right now very very adventurous though something for all of you bulldogs and fat ducklings out there.

personally i would probably go for mistral./mag

ps. Oaxen in the archipelago of stockholm is the best restaurant in sweden but i think they close in september im not sure ds

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Think about what you like in Paris. If you like Gagnaire then Mistral is the place for you (book early) if you like Taillevent then Edsbacka Krog (this is your most expensive choice and you need to add a taxi drive of 40-50 USD each way to your equation unless you are willing to test out the train system, in which case you will still need a short cab trip). In my opinion I would choose Mistral because it somehow seems the most "Swedish" of the options (even if the atmosphere at Edsbacka is very Swedish).

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I'm off to Stockholm in October and browsing through this board and a few others, I'm amazed that "Edsbacka Krog", the only 2 Michelin starred-establishment isn't very high on anyone's list.

Has anyone tried it recently? I'd like some advice from a fellow eg'er before I shell out a king's ransom.

Also wonder whether anyone has been to Mistral, dubbed "Sweden's answer to El Bulli"...a 6-table place with dishes like almond and Jerusalem artichoke soup with fried apples; mackerel sashimi with crisped pork skin and oyster foam, caviar and fresh herbs, and the signature lamb's-neck confit in pimento-ey chorizo fat

I think the reason is that Edsbacka will not bring anything new to the table. You will definitely get excellent food - Fois Gras (one of the few in Stockholm still serving it "officially") de canard en tranches minces, framboises et brioche aux herbes. Coquilles St. Jaques légèrement grillées, porc et baies d'argousier. Magret de canard, foie gras de canard poêlé, sauce aux cerises et carottes. You get the picture... I love Edsbacka - but my curiosity would never take me there. BUT - looking for really good french food with a twist of the north: GO THERE!!

Right now, Mistral and Esperanto are the "Pepsis" (the choice of a new generation) of Stockholm, and they are good. Some people might think they are too experimental and I am personally quite tired of the overly crazy, but honestly - theryre fantastic. Which should you choose? Depends on you mood. Where Esperanto is contemporary and young in both flavor and look - Mistral is nature, organic flavors and produce, nose to tail... You get it...

My personal favourite at the moment is Lux...

Some websites:

www.edsbackakrog.se

www.esperantorestaurant.se

www.luxstockholm.se

Mistral does not have a website - but an email rest.mistral@telia.com for reservations.

Have a great time!

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Magnus Lindgren, mdibiaso and Badabing, thanks for your recs! I have booked reservations with Mistral and Esperanto...

One last thing I'm looking for is a recommendation for the more typical standard Swedish far, husmanskost (?). Any places you would specifically return to for the good old Swedish classics?

Thanks again...

Edited by Sea Urchin Ragout (log)
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Magnus Lindgren, mdibiaso and Badabing, thanks for your recs! I have booked reservations with Mistral and Esperanto...

One last thing I'm looking for is a recommendation for the more typical standard Swedish far, husmanskost (?). Any places you would specifically return to for the good old Swedish classics?

Thanks again...

Eriks Bakficka has husman that is very typical for lunch. Have never tried but his pedigree is good. Eriks

Or Bakfickan at Operakällaren. Operakällaren

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  • 2 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I was there recently for a Monday lunch. The place was nearly empty so we got the undivided attention of all the staff!

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Here's a picture from the outside...needless to say I made sure we passed the restaurants a few times during our stay in Stockholm so I could stand and stare inside :biggrin:

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Started with a great selection of breads. The most memorable one was a type of fennel-seeded dark bread which tasted amazing. Also note the flat bread which I assume is typically Swedish as our hotel also served it at breakfast as did various other places.

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My starter was "Bleak roe from Kalix on malt brioche with lemon cream and cured onion". It was absolutely and utterly sensational. Never tasted such exquisite brioche, every lemon cream/onion/Brioche/roe mouthful was perfect.

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Partner chose for the "Herb marinated herring with “Västerbotten cheese” and crisp bread". Good tastes all round...the cheese / herring combo worked but was not exceptional.

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Mains, I went for "Roe deer “Wallenbergare” with peas, almond pommes purée and ligonberries". Not very exciting but exactly the type of perfectly executed comfort food I was looking for. The almond pommes purée were creamy without being too buttery and just had a perfect hint of almond which complemented the peas very well.

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The other mains was, however, a much better choice in hindsight. Dill cod with horseradish, bleak roe, poached quail egg and oyster foam. Superb. The oyster foam and dill infused the whole dish, the cod and horseradish worked...I kept trying to steal more bits from her plate which the maitre d' seemed to take as a compliment!

Overall, Leijontornet greatly impressed from the moment of reservation (they offered us various alternatives when we originally asked for a Sunday evening slot) right to getting the very reasonable bill.

Also went to Mistral during the Stockholm visit...more about this later on once I have deciphered my notes!

Have an upcoming reservation at Leijontornet in Stockholm but am coming up empty with fresh reviews of any detail.

Anyone been lately?  Anyone seen any recent reviews (say, since the restructuring/rebirth with the help of the folks from Oaxen awhile back)?

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Thanks for the post, Sea Urchin Ragout. I've already posted my report on another site and was trying to avoid a double posting. However, as I posed my initial question here, I suppose I should follow it up...

Had an excellent meal at a Stockholm restaurant that is slowly gaining an excellent reputation after a major rebirth approximately one year ago: Leijontornet. Leijontornet is located in Stockholm’s Old Town – an area thick with tourist traps and inflated prices. The room is below ground-level and contains a substantial piece of Stockholm’s original city wall. Leijontornet’s rebirth has consisted of a developing menus and an identity focusing on cutting edge and old Swedish dishes and tastes. As much of a cliché as this sounds (and frankly is!), the combinations worked wonderfully and I (being an American residing in Sweden for 10 years) really appreciated what they were doing. I splurged in regards to my wine menu but enjoyed some wines I honestly would never have been able to sample otherwise. I’ll spare you all any detailed impressions of the wines but they were all magnificent.

I've taken the course descriptions directly from the menu so an occasional "(sic)" perhaps should have been included...

Served after ordering and refilled through the first course: 2004 Grüner Veltliner Honivogl Smaragd

Two tastes: one cold, one warm: one dish with bleakfish roe, pickled herring and mousse of jerusalem artichoke and one dish consisting of a layers of pureed cranberries, truffle mousse thick veal reduction topped with small bits of fried lardo.

Fennel baked cod with horseradish, raw shrimps in brown butter, oyster creme and quail egg

The cod had been taken from a large piece of loin or, what they call over here, back and was simply four or five, silver-dollar sized flakes. The “horseradish” was 3 or 4 cubes made of horseradish, milk and gelatin (or some modern, low-temp equivalent) and provided an initial burst of clean milk flavor followed after several seconds with the nasal sting of the horseradish. All in all, a wonderful dish with a surprising number of contrasting flavors and textures.

Langoustine on pearl barley* risotto with warm shellfish jelly and juniper smoked parsnip

2000 Chardonnay “Les Noisetiers”, Kistler

Once again, a dish affecting many senses. The shellfish jelly was based on an intense reduction made form the langoustine shells, I believe. The effect of the smoked parsnip on the langoustine-heavy dish managed, for me, to bring up associations with the smoked, fresh, shell-on shrimp many Swedes love. *I believe the English menu has a wrong translation as the Swedish menu called this “sago risotto” and this wasn’t pearly barley. It had an agreeably chewy texture and the flavor of the sago (or whatever it was cooked with) was reminiscent of sushi rice.

Preserved rabbit and brisket with hazelnut, raisins and juniper, served with cream of truffles from Gotland and burnt apple tree vinegar.

2004 Scharzhofberger Riesling Spätlese

Gotland is an island off the Southeast coast of Sweden. The preserved rabbit and brisket was a rillette-like preparation, topped with the truffle cream and slices of fresh truffle, all encased in a gel infused with the vinager. The smokiness of the vinager worked very well with the fatty meats and, despite the aggressive components, the dish was wonderfully balanced.

Crayfish glazed pikeperch with mousseline of scallops, squid from Kattegatt with burned leek and unripe elderberries

1998 Domaine de Chevalier Blanc

The pikeperch had been glazed with a syrupy reduction based on crayfish shells. The unripe elderberries had been processed/preserved in the same manner as capers. As amused and enamored as I was with the elderberries, this was easily the weakest dish of the evening as the pikeperch had a tough, cured texture.

Taste: braised pork cheek (that’s all I managed to scribble…)

Organic veal in three textures with lingonberries, Jersusalem artichokes and estragon

1991 Grange

The three textures were raw (fillet), braised (brisket) and ? (sorry!). It’s not included in the English description but this was served with an incredible square of homemade blood-pudding that had been seared on the outside but was meltingly fresh and nearly liquid on the inside. The lingonberries had been preserved in an old-fashioned manner from northern Sweden (called "vattlingon", they are simply “preserved” in water) that amplifies their sourness and bitterness while removing much of their (already restrained) sweetness. Truly wonderful!

Savoury cheesecake of goats cheese with caraway seeds, meadowsweet braised beetroot and french toast of almond biscuit

Actually two cheeses on this plate, both from a small farm about 50 miles West of Stockholm, one goat and one nearly liquid, white-mold cow’s. The “French toast” actually combines two, classic Swedish sweets: “Fattiga riddare” (very similar to American French toast) and “mandelkubb” (a dry, crumbly teacake leavened with ammonium carbonate and flavored with bitter almonds).

Served now and with a healthy pause to enjoy by itself: 1990 Château d'Yquem

Taste: gooseberry soup, homemade granola w/dried currents, gooseberries, natural milk

The breakfast of (Nordic) gods! Wonderful gooseberry puree topped with the granola and exquisite, rich unpasteurized and unhomogenized (and ice-cold!) milk.

Chocolate with arrack, semolina porridge and rosehip, bitter almond mousse and frozen buttermilk

The semolina porridge (called “klappgröt” in Swedish) is another old-fashioned dessert made from heavily whisking cream-of-wheat until it gets very light and fluffy. The buttermilk was truly buttermilk (i.e., the byproduct of making butter) and not the cultured product.

Served with espresso: Oatmeal wafers w/hazelnut créme, liquorice caramel, elderberry jellies

I had seen an impressive (for Sweden/Europe) boubon list and asked about a recommendation. What I got was a tasting of: I.W. Harper 12-year old, Old Charter Proprieter’s Reserve, Blanton’s, and some horrible mesquite-infused whiskey served as a “joke” (McKendrick’s?).

Service was formal yet relaxed. The sommelier was obviously enjoying himself and the wines he was serving.

Truly a wonderful evening with excellent food and wine. Leijontornet is well worth searching out for any visitors to Stockholm that perhaps have tried the city's traditional top 5.

Edited by Bridgestone (log)
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