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Mushrooms


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59 minutes ago, jmacnaughtan said:

I'm curious when people in the UK/USA/etc. talk about chanterelles: are you talking about these or these?

 

girolles.jpg.3d7803e1a2026eb65e06422e50bd2e0f.jpg

 

 

In UK, I'd be talking about these. But I'm in China and will say the same.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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56 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

In UK, I'd be talking about these. But I'm in China and will say the same.

 

I always thought it was the same in France as over there, given it's a French name. Here though, the bottom ones are the chanterelles and the top ones are girolles. I think the generic family name is chanterelle, but I'm not sure.

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Cantharellus cibarius  Latin: cantharellus, "chanterelle"; cibarius, "culinary") is a species of golden chanterelle mushroom in the genus Canthatellus. It is also known as girolle.

 

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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7143FE93-B51E-4A68-9897-E1811E1FE5B8.thumb.jpeg.5b8024cedc9b26ec39031f71b3c3fd37.jpeg

 

This behemoth was growing about 10’ up on a maple tree - never have I seen a mushroom stalk of such girth (there’s a joke in there somewhere!).  Truth be told it must have been multiple stalks which turned into Siamese twins (possibly quadruplets) .... thick as a can of beans!  

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4 hours ago, TicTac said:

This behemoth was growing about 10’ up on a maple tree - never have I seen a mushroom stalk of such girth (there’s a joke in there somewhere!).  Truth be told it must have been multiple stalks which turned into Siamese twins (possibly quadruplets) .... thick as a can of beans!  

 

Jonelmus variety?

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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On 10/12/2020 at 6:56 PM, Nyleve Baar said:

My husband just found a bunch of elm oysters on our property! Will be cooking up something mushroomy tomorrow. What do you like to do with these?

 

 

Sear till browned all over in butter - salt - on good bread.

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Elm oysters cooking in butter - tossed with roasted butternut squash, sage, garlic, ricotta gnocchi and a little Parmesan. Very good. These mushrooms have great texture, but not as much flavour as some others I’ve tried. Definitely worth picking! 

9ADE2010-097B-4449-AA64-A322BF3C47BB.jpeg

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3 hours ago, Nyleve Baar said:

Elm oysters cooking in butter - tossed with roasted butternut squash, sage, garlic, ricotta gnocchi and a little Parmesan. Very good. These mushrooms have great texture, but not as much flavour as some others I’ve tried. Definitely worth picking! 

9ADE2010-097B-4449-AA64-A322BF3C47BB.jpeg

 

Looks good.  I would say most in those pan are a bit past their prime pick'age window as the gills are no longer white but starting to brown a bit.  Ideally you want to pick them before the gills open completely and are still very tight/white.  That will impact flavour.

 

But then again, when comparing to your foraged porcini....not much of a contest!  😛

 

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Thanks for the advice. I've never eaten these before. I did toss out a few my husband picked, as they were one step beyond. There may still be more out there - will look when it stops raining.

 

So the interesting thing about porcinis is that I actually don't love the texture of them when they're fresh, although the flavour is wonderful. I prefer to use them dried. These elm oysters have a nice texture but not as much flavour.

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1 hour ago, ambra said:

I have some fresh shiitakes I might not be able to use this week.. if I were going to freeze them, would it be better to freeze raw or cook first? Thank you ! 

 

Cook first. Uncooked shiitake do not freeze well. The temperature breaks the cell walls and when you defrost them they turn to mush.

Drying is, by far, the best way to preserve them.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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39 minutes ago, weinoo said:

I just came home with a few pints of mushrooms from the greenmarket.

 

39 minutes ago, weinoo said:

What would you do with them if you were gonna have them with dinner tonight (sheet pan chicken).

 

Marsala sauce / gravy?

 

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13 hours ago, weinoo said:

I just came home with a few pints of mushrooms from the greenmarket.

 

1023136631_Mushrooms10-19.jpeg.642c091fac3ac5efa55c5b1b5cc73884.jpeg

 

What would you do with them if you were gonna have them with dinner tonight (sheet pan chicken).

I guess it's too late, and it's not a side dish, but I probably would have done tagliatelle ai funghi. :) What did you end up doing? I'm sure it was delicious!

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2 hours ago, ambra said:

I guess it's too late, and it's not a side dish, but I probably would have done tagliatelle ai funghi. :) What did you end up doing? I'm sure it was delicious!

 

I did the sorta simple sauté above by @heidih.  Ramp butter, thyme, parsley, chives. When I bring home the next batch, I'll get a little more creative.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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