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Kerry Beal

Steamed Puddings- eG Bake-Off X

28 posts in this topic

According to jackal10 this Sunday is "stir up Sunday", the last day to make your fruit containing steamed puddings before the holiday.

I've been following with interest "Spotted Dick: The Topic". I love a good steamed pudding. My dad makes a wonderful one with cranberries and a nice sauce with lots of butter and rum.

I used to made a lighter version of the traditional christmas pudding from one of Edna Stabler's books, as I recall it contained carrots.

recipeGullet contains one recipe for Steamed Christmas Pudding.

So lets get out our pudding basins, our racks and stock pots and start making some steamed puddings. Doesn't have to be a fruit pudding, anything you consider steamed and pudding is fair game.

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Great idea Kerry Beal!

I'll take a shot at the traditional figgy duff from Newfoundland and Labrador - not to be confused with Figgy Duff the folk music group from Newfoundland and Labrador. No need to take a shot at them.


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Can anyone give a brief overview of the type of dish needed to steam the puddings in?

Do you need a special metal lidded steam pudding pan? Is this best? Are there substitutes?

Thanks, uncertainty over the type of equipment needed to make a steamed pudding has kept me from trying one so far... Thanks in advance!


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Can anyone give a brief overview of the type of dish needed to steam the puddings in? 

Do you need a special metal lidded steam pudding pan?  Is this best?  Are there substitutes?

Thanks, uncertainty over the type of equipment needed to make a steamed pudding has kept me from trying one so far...  Thanks in advance!

Here is a picture of a crockery pudding basin. No lid. To close it you put a couple of layers of parchment, a topping of tinfoil then you tie string under the rim.

I've been thinking about those silicone straps you can buy for trussing roasts (I seem to recall that Marlene has some) and wondering if they could replace the string.

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Can anyone give a brief overview of the type of dish needed to steam the puddings in? 

Do you need a special metal lidded steam pudding pan?  Is this best?  Are there substitutes?

Thanks, uncertainty over the type of equipment needed to make a steamed pudding has kept me from trying one so far...  Thanks in advance!

Here is a picture of a crockery pudding basin. No lid. To close it you put a couple of layers of parchment, a topping of tinfoil then you tie string under the rim.

I've been thinking about those silicone straps you can buy for trussing roasts (I seem to recall that Marlene has some) and wondering if they could replace the string.

Thank you. Does the pudding basin have any wholes on the bottom to aid in the steaming process or is it a solid piece?

So when it is time to cook the pudding do you put the covered dish into a larger pot of simmering water? (Sorry for the elementary questions! I looked back at a couple of older eGullet threads on steamed puddings, including jackal10's wonderful course, but was not 100% clear on this...)

I don't want to distract from the main cook-off topic so if I'm still confused I'll start a separate thread if you like! :smile:


Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Thank you.  Does the pudding basin have any wholes on the bottom to aid in the steaming process or is it a solid piece?

So when it is time to cook the pudding do you put the covered dish into a larger pot of simmering water?  (Sorry for the elementary questions!  I looked back at a couple of older eGullet threads on steamed puddings, including jackal10's wonderful course, but was not 100% clear on this...)

I don't want to distract from the main cook-off topic so if I'm still confused I'll start a separate thread if you like!  :smile:

No need for another thread, this is a perfect place for questions.

No holes in the basin. The covered and tied basin goes into a larger pot, (I put it on a rack) water under the rack, get the water steaming and away you go. A crock pot works nicely - it can be ignored completely for hours with no danger of evaporation.

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I've been making steamed puddings of all kinds for 30 years--I just like them and the sauces that go with them--and while I have several metal pudding molds with fitted, clamped lids, I have made steamed puddings in just about everything you can think of. I like to give small plum puddings ("Christmas" puddings) as gifts and make them in small ramekins, little French coffee bowls, or, for something slightly larger, mini bread pans. I cover the batter with pieces of cotton cut out of a freshly laundered old sheet or pillowcase; I always butter and flour the cloth. Then I cover the pan/bowl/ramekin with heavy-duty foil secured with fat rubber bands; sometimes these break, but if you use a couple, you're usually fine. So molds are not necessary--truth be told, it is easier to unmold a pudding from a smooth ceramic bowl than from a fluted or otherwise decorative metal mold.

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Uh, before all the steamed pudding experts begin the important arguments about pudding basins, clamped lids, cranberries vs. carrots, etc. can someone please tell me:

what is a steamed pudding?



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what is a steamed pudding?

From www.answers.com -

STEAMED PUDDING

A sweet or savory pudding that is cooked (usually in a special steamed-pudding mold) on a rack over boiling water in a covered pot. The pudding mold is usually decorative so that when the finished pudding (which is firm) is unmolded it retains its decorative shape. Steamed puddings can take up to 3 hours to cook on stovetop, half that time in a pressure cooker. They're customarily served with a sauce. The traditional Christmas plum pudding, for instance, is customarily accompanied with hard sauce.

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My absolutely favourite steamed pudding is a take on the sussex pond lemon steamed pudding ... by Jamie Oliver it is a chocolate and whole orange pudding.

Eaten hot or cold, it is the easiest thing to prepare for guests and tastes just divine ... sort of like a Terry's chocolate orange (if you have tasted one of those).

There is a copy of the recipe here: http://www.cook-book.com/recipes/chocolate...ge_pudding.html

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what is a steamed pudding?

From www.answers.com -

STEAMED PUDDING

A sweet or savory pudding that is cooked (usually in a special steamed-pudding mold) on a rack over boiling water in a covered pot. The pudding mold is usually decorative so that when the finished pudding (which is firm) is unmolded it retains its decorative shape. Steamed puddings can take up to 3 hours to cook on stovetop, half that time in a pressure cooker. They're customarily served with a sauce. The traditional Christmas plum pudding, for instance, is customarily accompanied with hard sauce.

A succinct reply, thank you. Aside from my general ignorance about steamed puddings, I never thought that steaming = baking, which was part of my confusion. Is this a topic of debate, or is the equation "pudding = dessert" ?

Which leads to a second question: are savory versions (not desserts, I assume) generally served as part of a main course, or if not, what is their role in a meal?



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ohhh...I LOVE steamed puddings! I have a recipe for steamed banana pudding with butterscotch sauce that is a huge hit with my family every time. I've been wanting to tinker with the recipe to substitute pumpkin for the banana for a holiday version. I'll give it a go!

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Is this just sweet puddings?

Don't forget savoury ones: steak and kidney, leek and bacon (boiled leg), Dr Marigold etc etc

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Is this just sweet puddings?

Don't forget savoury ones: steak and kidney, leek and bacon (boiled leg), Dr Marigold etc etc

I think savory should be included for sure.

I wonder jackal10 (as the resident eG steamed pudding guru) if you would be able to answer LindaK's question from post #11 above?


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

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Savoury puddings are the main course. Rare good ballast for an empty stomach.

They usually contain the main protein, and the long boiling in an insulting jacket of suet pastry ensured slow gentle cooking with all the flavour sealed in. Use stewing meat with lots of connective tissue to melt into unctiousness

Let me recycle this:

Steak and Kidney Pudding.

Pudding, not pie. Pie is just a stew with a pastry lid. In Steak and Kidney Pudding, the meat is sealed in a suet crust and boiled for six or more hours to melting, tasty, meaty loveliness. To quote Dr Marigold (one of Charles Dickens’ more obscure characters), describing his pudding; "A beefsteak-pudding, with two kidneys, a dozen oysters and a couple of mushrooms thrown in. It’s a pudding to put a man in a good humour with everything, except the two bottom buttons of his waistcoat."

DR MARIGOLD'S PUDDING

Serves 12. Good, cheap eating.

For the pastry:

1lb/500g flour

8oz/250g shredded beef suet

1 tsp black treacle/molasses (gives the pastry a golden color and taste)

Salt

Cold water to mix

i4171.jpg

Line a large (2pt) pudding basin ( or heat-resistant bowl). Reserve 1/3rd of the pastry for a lid.

i4172.jpg

2.5lbs/1Kg stewing beef cubed. Skirt steak is good.

1lb/500g chopped beef or veal kidney

i4173.jpg

A dozen oysters, or a can or two of smoked oysters

A couple of large Mushrooms cut up, or even better, dried morels

2 onions, chopped and softened

2 Tbs flour

Salt and pepper;

1 Tbs Worcesteshire sauce

Easy on the seasonings. Since everything is sealed in, the flavors intensify.

You can, I suppose, omit the kidneys and the oysters, but it will not be as rich. You can use anchovies instead of oysters, but watch the salt level.

Mix well and pack into the lined basin/bowl. Fill with a little stock or water, but there won’t be much room for liquid.

i4174.jpg

Cover with the reserved pastry

i4175.jpg

Tie a piece of greaseproof paper over, leaving a fold for expansion. Hint: easiest if you secure it with a large elastic band before tying with string. Don't forget to leave a loop of string over the top abd under the bottom, tied on both sides as a handle to help get it out of the hot pan after cooking.

Put in a pan of water. Add a cut lemon to the water to protect the pan. Simmer (or rather not quite simmer) for 6 to 12 hours.

i4176.jpg

Once simmering, it may be easier to put the whole pan in a low oven (90C/200F) for most of the cooking. Check the water level occasionally and if needed top it up to stop it boiling dry.

Turn out into a deep dish, as there will be lots of gravy. Unfortunately I did not manage to snap this step before the hungry guests got at it. Serve with brussel sprouts, and mashed potatoes.


Edited by jackal10 (log)

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Thanks so much for that great demo. I love a good beefsteak and kidney pud. I'll skip the brussel sprouts though.

I think I'm going to see if I can find some suet today. Often easier closer to Christmas around here. Actually, I should probably have a root through the freezer first.

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That is one impressive steak and kidney pudding; thank you.

I'd like to note that sweet does not necessarily mean dessert; in my family, plum pudding was served WITH DINNER (alongside the meat course as a side dish), covered in a lovely clear sauce loaded with brandy and nutmeg.

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I grew up having a plum pudding for dessert every Christmas. My great-aunt Violet always made it. Sadly, no one asked her for the recipe. I have the recipes for the accompanying hard sauce and brandy sauce, and have the same pudding basin she used. Would like to make something close to what I remember, dark and rich. So, after mulling over dozens of recipes, I made a pint-sized pudding on Sunday.

Here's the pudding basin...

gallery_9294_5431_54473.jpg

Butter the basin and fill with batter...

gallery_9294_5431_128509.jpg

Cover with buttered parchment paper, wrap with foil, and tie to secure...

gallery_9294_5431_60457.jpg

Steam a few hours...

gallery_9294_5431_1398.jpg

The pudding has firmed up now, looks and smells pretty good. Will store it in the fridge for a month.

gallery_9294_5431_179454.jpg

Of course, the proof of the pudding is in the eating and this will have to wait until Christmas. So, I'll report back then.


~Amy

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Wow! Amazing puddings, everyone!

I've been so busy since the Sunday following Thanksgiving I couldn't manage to get a proper pudding stirred on Stir Sunday (or what that day was called I don't exactly recall) so I'm going to have to make do with a sticky toffee pud for desert on the big day. I didn't have time to get my Bûche de Noël made either. :hmmm::sad:

So Sticky Toffee it is.

I did go by Ace Hardware yesterday and picked up a steamed pudding tin *the only one on the shelf*, which I am hoping will do for my Sticky Toffee pud. I plan on baking it rather than steaming it, of course, and hope it will release cleanly from the tin. This is why I'm going to bake it today and reheat it tomorrow, just in case it all goes pear shaped and I have to switch to Plan B, which will be a good old fashioned southern Pecan Pie. But that, as they say, will be a whole 'nother thread.

Next year, I'll do that proper Plum Pudding, I will, whilst listing to Pink Floyd's The Wall. Ah, Yuletide Carols!

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Reporting back...

My Christmas plum pudding was spot on. I couldn't have been more pleased. Took a picture as the flame died down.

gallery_9294_5431_29690.jpg


~Amy

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But I've got a stash of suet, and I'd like to make some for next year.

Apart from the suet, the other obstacle to the project is a shortage of pudding basins .. anybody know where I can get small ones, short of importing them from the UK?

Lehman's and Amazon both list larger ones, but it would be silly for me to make big puddings, because there are only 3 of us and my recipe is very rich, and those I plan to gift are also small households.

If you know of functional substitutes for pudding basins, I'll entertain those ideas too. I even hear that people are doing steamed puddings in the microwave ... tell me it's not so, please! Unless, of course, it's very successful :-)

Help ... ?

tia -


Lynn

Oregon, originally Montreal

Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting "holy shit! ....what a ride!"

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i should start out by saying that i've never actually made a steamed pudding myself, though i've been wanting to for ages.

but in thinking about the idea over the years, and reading recipes, it occurred to me (or maybe i saw it somewhere) -- could you make mini puddings in small (250mL) wide-mouthed mason jars? they would certainly stand up to steaming/heating no problem. would this work?

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My absolutely favourite steamed pudding is a take on the sussex pond lemon steamed pudding ... by Jamie Oliver it is a chocolate and whole orange pudding.

Eaten hot or cold, it is the easiest thing to prepare for guests and tastes just divine ... sort of like a Terry's chocolate orange (if you have tasted one of those).

There is a copy of the recipe here: http://www.cook-book.com/recipes/chocolate...ge_pudding.html

Oh no! The link is broken!!! Can you reup it?

tia ...


Lynn

Oregon, originally Montreal

Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting "holy shit! ....what a ride!"

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i should start out by saying that i've never actually made a steamed pudding myself, though i've been wanting to for ages.

but in thinking about the idea over the years, and reading recipes, it occurred to me (or maybe i saw it somewhere) -- could you make mini puddings in small (250mL) wide-mouthed mason jars? they would certainly stand up to steaming/heating no problem. would this work?

Hmm ... hadn't thought of those, but I don't know why it wouldn't, though they would be *very* small .. but I do have one rather small pudding basin, I don't know what it's capacity is but it's no bigger than a pint, and maybe smaller. I haven't seen it in a while, and I hope it hasn't got broken. One of my antiques :-) So perhaps half pint widemouths would work. I don't think I'd risk the very tiny ones, that would probably make nice little single portions .. though once you know your recipe works in a more conventional size, it might be a neat experiment.

But someone upthread did say they use all kinds of other containers, whatever comes to hand essentially, so I think I'll poke around and see what I can find.

Judging by this thread, most people don't think it's too late to make them, so since I have a fridge full of suet, maybe, after the fruitcakes and the pickled cabbage, I'll run a quick test!

I've never made one either, but the people I know who do make them aren't any smarter than I am ... I don't think, anyway! lol! So, I don't think it will be a problem. Unless of course, my grandmother's old recipe is missing something or other, and since no one in my generation has ever used it we don't know about it .. only one way to find out, though :-) The instructions are a bit sketchy, but until I get the fruitcakes out of the way I'll keep looking in on this thread, in case someone posts some tricky caveats. I doubt that they really need to be steamed for 9 hours, as this recipe calls for; I suspect that that is because my grandmother made one huge one for Christmas Day with the whole extended family at the table. I can't imagine little pint or half pint ones would take that long.

And that brings me to another question - do they freeze? I'd think they would, but has anyone done it?


Lynn

Oregon, originally Montreal

Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting "holy shit! ....what a ride!"

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